At long last, the iPhone 3G S launch day has arrived!

Apple retail stores opened at 7 a.m. in all time zones to facilitate the launch of the iPhone family's new flagship device.  At some of the major Apple retail stores around the world, lines began to form as early as yesterday afternoon.

Reports are in that, lines aside, the process of purchasing and activating a 3G S is quick and painless -- in and out in just a few minutes.  Those who setup mail pre-orders should be receiving their units today (although we've heard reports from a few users seeing a shipping indication of Monday).

As we described in some detail last week, the iPhone 3G S features a significantly faster main processor and a much more capable graphics processor as compared to the iPhone 3G.  Additionally, the unit features twice the system RAM of the iPhone 3G, which should improve the overall stability of apps running on the device.

While many existing games will automatically benefit from the added muscle of the iPhone 3G S, we're anxious to see the first titles that appear with features that specficially target the new capabilities of the device.  The first games supporting iPhone OS 3.0 have already appeared -- stay tuned for upcoming games with GPU shader support and other such goodness.  Watch out Sony and Nintendo....

  • http://www.GalleyTech.com/ Galley

    Mine arrived via FedEx at 11:15 a.m.

    http://twitpic.com/7szir

  • http://www.GalleyTech.com/ Galley

    Mine arrived via FedEx at 11:15 a.m.

    http://twitpic.com/7szir

  • Sufy

    Awesome Galley. I so need one but it's too expensive

    • Nuters

      Only 200 bucks

      • Selina

        £440.40 starting point in the UK....

  • Sufy

    Awesome Galley. I so need one but it's too expensive

    • Nuters

      Only 200 bucks

      • http://karen@cullen.myzen.co.uk Selina

        £440.40 starting point in the UK....

  • http://partis.si tine

    what are u using on pic?

  • http://partis.si tine

    what are u using on pic?

  • djflippy

    The wait times weren't bad at all. I got there at 7am, when they opened the doors, and was to work by 9am. Two lines, one for pre-orders and one for the mentally challenged. They had employees sweeping the lines to check info beforehand, to make sure each patron was checked in properly. Very professional, friendly, and fast here in Orange County, CA. One word of caution: make sure the primary person on your account is present.

  • djflippy

    The wait times weren't bad at all. I got there at 7am, when they opened the doors, and was to work by 9am. Two lines, one for pre-orders and one for the mentally challenged. They had employees sweeping the lines to check info beforehand, to make sure each patron was checked in properly. Very professional, friendly, and fast here in Orange County, CA. One word of caution: make sure the primary person on your account is present.

  • http://www.zero101.com Chris

    Mine showed up at 10:14am EST this morning.

    Currently syncing with my Macbook, which is going to take FOREVER. (copying 20GB of music FTL)

  • http://www.zero101.com Chris

    Mine showed up at 10:14am EST this morning.

    Currently syncing with my Macbook, which is going to take FOREVER. (copying 20GB of music FTL)

  • bob

    for anyone that is on the edge and i presume into games (because of the website) its a screamer, sooo fast, at loading and no drop in frame rates, very smooth, also i tested game after game and never needed to restart the phone or got memory low warnings, its a fantastic phone, maybe what the original 3G should have been, but thankfully arm have caught up with what people want / expect

  • bob

    for anyone that is on the edge and i presume into games (because of the website) its a screamer, sooo fast, at loading and no drop in frame rates, very smooth, also i tested game after game and never needed to restart the phone or got memory low warnings, its a fantastic phone, maybe what the original 3G should have been, but thankfully arm have caught up with what people want / expect

  • Loner

    @ bob: Its not that ARM has caught up now, its Apple finally putting some of these are ARM processor in these phones.

    • arn

      @loner: It's not like these ARM chips have been around and Apple chose not to use them. I believe they only recently have become available in quantity.

      arn

  • Loner

    @ bob: Its not that ARM has caught up now, its Apple finally putting some of these are ARM processor in these phones.

    • arn

      @loner: It's not like these ARM chips have been around and Apple chose not to use them. I believe they only recently have become available in quantity.

      arn

  • Mafanzp

    The 3gs is a waste for me since I already have a dedicated game device which is better than the 3gs

    • SalsaMD

      GOK. But what else can it do? And how many devices to you carry on your Bat Belt?

  • Mafanzp

    The 3gs is a waste for me since I already have a dedicated game device which is better than the 3gs

    • SalsaMD

      GOK. But what else can it do? And how many devices to you carry on your Bat Belt?

  • sticktron

    Tried to get one this morning on the way to work (in Toronto) and Rogers' computer system and phone system were both jammed up.... the guy tried for 30 minutes to set me up, but couldn't get through.

  • sticktron

    Tried to get one this morning on the way to work (in Toronto) and Rogers' computer system and phone system were both jammed up.... the guy tried for 30 minutes to set me up, but couldn't get through.

  • Greg

    "Watch out Sony and Nintendo"... yeah, but there is a difference. The PSP and the DS aren't $500 and don't require a monthly fee to use. I don't think they have anything to worry about :)

    • Henrique

      If you buy a good phone, GPS, camera and portable console, it'll cost a lot more than $500.
      The iPhone does all that pretty well, IMO. And if Real Racing already delivers graphics easily comparable to the PSP, I can only dream about what the devs will do with this new GPU.
      Speaking of the GPU, I know it's a PowerVR SGX, but which model? Does anyone know for sure? Not even the teardowns reveal that info...

      • benjamin

        you're totaly right,a descent gps with a reasonable screan will cost about 300 bucks, a psp/ds/gaming console 150 bucks,a pda 400 bucks a digital camera:50-100 bucks,
        i know what i'm going to schoose.

      • Speedie

        except that you'll have an awesome GPS, awesome portable console, and an awesome camera instead of a mediocre (at best) all-in-one.

        I actually own an iPhone but I'm definitely not giving up my PSP or DS any time soon for this thing. as soon as the best games stop having "tower defense" in their description, maybe I'll take a second look at it. until then, this is a *phone* with the ability to run objective-c apps.

  • Greg

    "Watch out Sony and Nintendo"... yeah, but there is a difference. The PSP and the DS aren't $500 and don't require a monthly fee to use. I don't think they have anything to worry about :)

    • Henrique

      If you buy a good phone, GPS, camera and portable console, it'll cost a lot more than $500.
      The iPhone does all that pretty well, IMO. And if Real Racing already delivers graphics easily comparable to the PSP, I can only dream about what the devs will do with this new GPU.
      Speaking of the GPU, I know it's a PowerVR SGX, but which model? Does anyone know for sure? Not even the teardowns reveal that info...

      • benjamin

        you're totaly right,a descent gps with a reasonable screan will cost about 300 bucks, a psp/ds/gaming console 150 bucks,a pda 400 bucks a digital camera:50-100 bucks,
        i know what i'm going to schoose.

      • Speedie

        except that you'll have an awesome GPS, awesome portable console, and an awesome camera instead of a mediocre (at best) all-in-one.

        I actually own an iPhone but I'm definitely not giving up my PSP or DS any time soon for this thing. as soon as the best games stop having "tower defense" in their description, maybe I'll take a second look at it. until then, this is a *phone* with the ability to run objective-c apps.

  • Adams Immersive

    I'd love to see an article (or thread) that tracks apps that do NOT work with 3.0. That seems to be rare, but I've always found that useful when a new Mac OS comes out.

    "Bat Belt" :D

  • Adams Immersive

    I'd love to see an article (or thread) that tracks apps that do NOT work with 3.0. That seems to be rare, but I've always found that useful when a new Mac OS comes out.

    "Bat Belt" :D

  • http://www.buzzabit.com/aaron Aaron Sullivan

    @Greg
    New iPod Touch is just around the corner. :)

  • http://www.buzzabit.com/aaron Aaron Sullivan

    @Greg
    New iPod Touch is just around the corner. :)

  • jj

    Hey, that's me at the back of the line! Was worth the (2 hour) wait.

  • jj

    Hey, that's me at the back of the line! Was worth the (2 hour) wait.

  • Icepulse

    "The PSP and the DS aren't $500 and don't require a monthly fee to use"

    Neither are they connected 24/7! THAT'S the big draw. Nor can they handle pain-free browsing, Email, seamless software distribution or updates.... and listening to your own soundtrack on the PSP is an exercise in frustration.... and a 32 GB drive helps, too.

  • Icepulse

    "The PSP and the DS aren't $500 and don't require a monthly fee to use"

    Neither are they connected 24/7! THAT'S the big draw. Nor can they handle pain-free browsing, Email, seamless software distribution or updates.... and listening to your own soundtrack on the PSP is an exercise in frustration.... and a 32 GB drive helps, too.

  • Harpua

    Anyone else having trouble downloading apps directly to their new phone?? I'm on a wifi network & it usually has not prob but since getting the 3gs it's taking forever... Sooo slow!! Any ideas? Too many people on iTunes?? Anyway, love the new phone, major update from my 1st gen giant paper weight ;^)

  • Harpua

    Anyone else having trouble downloading apps directly to their new phone?? I'm on a wifi network & it usually has not prob but since getting the 3gs it's taking forever... Sooo slow!! Any ideas? Too many people on iTunes?? Anyway, love the new phone, major update from my 1st gen giant paper weight ;^)

  • Lorenzo

    You can't simply compare the iPhone to the PSP or DS. It is true that that the iPhone is a remarkable phone/handheld gaming device. However, it is still primarily a phone. It will never be up to par with the PSP or DS because simply put, it is not primarily a gaming device.

    • http://www.blakespot.com Blake Patterson

      Actually, the Cortex A8 processor in the iPhone 3GS is significantly more powerful than the PSP's 333MHz (max) MIPS core. As well, the iPhone GPU is now likely more or less as powerful as that of the PSP's. And, of course, it's connected constantly.

      The iPhone is a rather capable competitor to the PSP but the soon-to-come updated iPod touch will seal the deal.

      • spiffyone

        While that is all somewhat true, Blake, the fact of the matter is that PSP and DS are portable game systems serving the portable game system market. iPhone, and iTouch (both are, after all, the same platform, simply different SKUs if you will) are, however, NOT portable game systems; they are a mobile platform squarely in the mobile market. Portable game systems and mobile platforms are not serving the same exact markets - they are distinct and wholly separate markets.

        Put it to you this way: those in the market for a DS and PSP are definitely in the market to play games on the go. That's what those devices are focused on above all else. Those in the market for an iPhone (and even an iPod touch) are not necessarily in the market for games. While iTouch/Phone is a viable platform for games, it is not the primary focus of the platform. I've stated it time and time again: comparisons of iTouch/Phone to PSP and DS are using faulty "logic". They do not directly compete with one another. The direct competitors to Apple's iPhone platform (iTouch/Phone platform) is not PSP or DS but rather Android, Windows Mobile/Zune, BREW, nGage, etc. Those are "all in one" mobile platforms that are also viable platforms for games despite games not being a primary focus.

      • it's friday man

        Spiffy writes: "I've stated it time and time again: comparisons of iTouch/Phone to PSP and DS are using faulty "logic". They do not directly compete with one another."

        Tell that to the big guns in the gaming industry, including Sony and Nintendo, who are all aware of - if not nervous of - the iPhone's success (or more correctly, the App Store).

        If they don't compete, it's because the DS and PSP are being left behind. DS sales are still high and it'll continue because Nintendo comes with a warm fuzzy feeling, but Sony are like a brick these days... sinking. They're out of ideas. Both companies are struggling to react to the App Store because *they* see it as a direct threat.

        At the end of the day, Apple have the consumer mind share, the tools and the developers to use them. If iDevices aren't directly affecting the "portable" market already, then it's only a matter of time before they do... and it's pretty unlikely Apple will stop with iPhone and iPod Touch.

      • spiffyone

        "Tell that to the big guns in the gaming industry, including Sony and Nintendo, who are all aware of - if not nervous of - the iPhone's success (or more correctly, the App Store)."

        Not accurate at all. Again, the devices are in different segments of the market. I don't know what Sony is thinking (who does, really), but Nintendo is not nervous at all as they will always have their share of the portable game market. Again, those in the market primarily for gaming on the go are more in the market for DS and PSP as those are dedicated game systems. iTouch/Phone is not, nor should it be. It serves a broader consumer base that is not made up primarily of gamers.

        Stating that "the companies in the portable game market are and should be nervous" is much like stating that those in the home console market are and should be nervous about the PC game market. Perhaps at one time they were, actually, now that I think of it (during the Atari days, with the C64's of the world) but the fact is that such "competition" didn't last long at all because different types of consumer needs, and thus consumers, were being targeted. There will always be a market for primary focus style devices and they will never directly compete with "all in one" style devices in the manner that they do products similar to themselves.

        And where is the idea that "Sony and Nintendo are nervous" coming from, exactly? Have we heard any of their reps state anything about Apple? Is it based on the idea that they are going digital download? Hate to break it to you, but Sony and Nintendo have been going that direction since before the App Store ever existed (or even the iTouch/Phone for that matter). All entertainment industries are going that route. Or is it still based on the erroneous notion that a mobile platform in the mobile market is somehow direct competition with dedicated portable gaming devices?

        Again, I point to the PC vs. video game home console example of why that thinking is based more on a biased assessment of the industry based more on fantasy than fact. Even the "analysts" who flaunt such fantasy are, in their industry reports, separating the industry into the distinct markets. Arcade. Home console. PC. Portable. Mobile. All are separate. They compete indirectly, not directly.

      • it's friday man

        "And where is the idea that "Sony and Nintendo are nervous" coming from, exactly?"

        I work with people in both companies, and they're apprehensive because they're the ones that get it in the neck.

        Look, this isn't just Apple or App Store or iPhones... it's about change, and the consequences of being outdone at your own game.

        I have a PSP, Wii, DS, 360, PS3, a dozen old school consoles and my iPhone. I'm spending WAY more money and time on my App Store addiction than I am on all of those others combined. It's not the hardware, it's not the products (many of them suck!), it's the mind share and the never-ending fun of window shopping in iTunes. It's my credit card details and my spending power going into Apple's coffers not the other companies; not PSN and not XBLA. And it's almost all being spent on games, which is - as you are so sure of - is the domain of "the real game companies".

        The box and the wrapping are irrelevant. It's where the money goes that matters, because there's a limited supply of it.

        Just because Apple doesn't have the foothold that MS, Sony and Nintendo have, doesn't mean they're not a contender. All those companies know they are, and they're all jealous of the App Store's unstoppable success.

      • spiffyone

        "And it's almost all being spent on games, which is - as you are so sure of - is the domain of "the real game companies"."

        Not once did I state that, so I kindly ask that you avoid attributing statements to me that were not stated at all. Thank you.

        What I am merely stating is a known fact: there is only indirect, not direct, competition between mobile platforms that are viable for games like iTouch/Phone, Zune, Android, etc. and the dedicated portable game systems like PSP and DS. It is the same type of "competition" that exists between the home game consoles (dedicated primarily to gaming) and the PC platform as concerns gaming. It's indirect competition, which is why no industry analysis firm directly compares sales of PC games against sales of 360,PS3 and Wii games (instead they compare the latter to each other, and in a separate section might detail PC game sales). Same deal with mobile platforms and portable game systems. No analysis firm used by the industry directly compares them all. Even Apple, when it shows iPhone apps sales, usually compares them to other mobile platforms, as that is the direct competition.

        A sizable chunk of consumers in the market for an iTouch/Phone are NOT necessarily in the market for games. Consider that the iTouch/Phone games, while individually constituting the largest percentage of purchases on the App Store still only accounts for a relatively small percentage of total iTouch/Phone consumer base purchases compared to the combined groups of other app purchases, music downloads, etc. That is, games sell quite well...but they aren't the MAIN selling point, and this is why it's not a game system but a viable platform for games.

        All game system owners buy games. All PSP and DS owners buy games (or at the very least are PRIMARILY in the market for games). All iTouch/Phone owners do not buy games, but a sizable enough percentage do that game companies cater to that percentage. Now, maybe that percentage may come to rival the number of owners of dedicated devices. I concede that possibility. That said, there is much to be said about knowing exactly what the consumer base desires. Dedicated game systems provide that assurance for game companies, and that's why they will never go away nor be in direct competition with platforms that have a much broader range of consumers, many of whom are not game consumers.

  • Lorenzo

    You can't simply compare the iPhone to the PSP or DS. It is true that that the iPhone is a remarkable phone/handheld gaming device. However, it is still primarily a phone. It will never be up to par with the PSP or DS because simply put, it is not primarily a gaming device.

    • http://www.blakespot.com Blake Patterson

      Actually, the Cortex A8 processor in the iPhone 3GS is significantly more powerful than the PSP's 333MHz (max) MIPS core. As well, the iPhone GPU is now likely more or less as powerful as that of the PSP's. And, of course, it's connected constantly.

      The iPhone is a rather capable competitor to the PSP but the soon-to-come updated iPod touch will seal the deal.

      • spiffyone

        While that is all somewhat true, Blake, the fact of the matter is that PSP and DS are portable game systems serving the portable game system market. iPhone, and iTouch (both are, after all, the same platform, simply different SKUs if you will) are, however, NOT portable game systems; they are a mobile platform squarely in the mobile market. Portable game systems and mobile platforms are not serving the same exact markets - they are distinct and wholly separate markets.

        Put it to you this way: those in the market for a DS and PSP are definitely in the market to play games on the go. That's what those devices are focused on above all else. Those in the market for an iPhone (and even an iPod touch) are not necessarily in the market for games. While iTouch/Phone is a viable platform for games, it is not the primary focus of the platform. I've stated it time and time again: comparisons of iTouch/Phone to PSP and DS are using faulty "logic". They do not directly compete with one another. The direct competitors to Apple's iPhone platform (iTouch/Phone platform) is not PSP or DS but rather Android, Windows Mobile/Zune, BREW, nGage, etc. Those are "all in one" mobile platforms that are also viable platforms for games despite games not being a primary focus.

      • it's friday man

        Spiffy writes: "I've stated it time and time again: comparisons of iTouch/Phone to PSP and DS are using faulty "logic". They do not directly compete with one another."

        Tell that to the big guns in the gaming industry, including Sony and Nintendo, who are all aware of - if not nervous of - the iPhone's success (or more correctly, the App Store).

        If they don't compete, it's because the DS and PSP are being left behind. DS sales are still high and it'll continue because Nintendo comes with a warm fuzzy feeling, but Sony are like a brick these days... sinking. They're out of ideas. Both companies are struggling to react to the App Store because *they* see it as a direct threat.

        At the end of the day, Apple have the consumer mind share, the tools and the developers to use them. If iDevices aren't directly affecting the "portable" market already, then it's only a matter of time before they do... and it's pretty unlikely Apple will stop with iPhone and iPod Touch.

      • spiffyone

        "Tell that to the big guns in the gaming industry, including Sony and Nintendo, who are all aware of - if not nervous of - the iPhone's success (or more correctly, the App Store)."

        Not accurate at all. Again, the devices are in different segments of the market. I don't know what Sony is thinking (who does, really), but Nintendo is not nervous at all as they will always have their share of the portable game market. Again, those in the market primarily for gaming on the go are more in the market for DS and PSP as those are dedicated game systems. iTouch/Phone is not, nor should it be. It serves a broader consumer base that is not made up primarily of gamers.

        Stating that "the companies in the portable game market are and should be nervous" is much like stating that those in the home console market are and should be nervous about the PC game market. Perhaps at one time they were, actually, now that I think of it (during the Atari days, with the C64's of the world) but the fact is that such "competition" didn't last long at all because different types of consumer needs, and thus consumers, were being targeted. There will always be a market for primary focus style devices and they will never directly compete with "all in one" style devices in the manner that they do products similar to themselves.

        And where is the idea that "Sony and Nintendo are nervous" coming from, exactly? Have we heard any of their reps state anything about Apple? Is it based on the idea that they are going digital download? Hate to break it to you, but Sony and Nintendo have been going that direction since before the App Store ever existed (or even the iTouch/Phone for that matter). All entertainment industries are going that route. Or is it still based on the erroneous notion that a mobile platform in the mobile market is somehow direct competition with dedicated portable gaming devices?

        Again, I point to the PC vs. video game home console example of why that thinking is based more on a biased assessment of the industry based more on fantasy than fact. Even the "analysts" who flaunt such fantasy are, in their industry reports, separating the industry into the distinct markets. Arcade. Home console. PC. Portable. Mobile. All are separate. They compete indirectly, not directly.

      • it's friday man

        "And where is the idea that "Sony and Nintendo are nervous" coming from, exactly?"

        I work with people in both companies, and they're apprehensive because they're the ones that get it in the neck.

        Look, this isn't just Apple or App Store or iPhones... it's about change, and the consequences of being outdone at your own game.

        I have a PSP, Wii, DS, 360, PS3, a dozen old school consoles and my iPhone. I'm spending WAY more money and time on my App Store addiction than I am on all of those others combined. It's not the hardware, it's not the products (many of them suck!), it's the mind share and the never-ending fun of window shopping in iTunes. It's my credit card details and my spending power going into Apple's coffers not the other companies; not PSN and not XBLA. And it's almost all being spent on games, which is - as you are so sure of - is the domain of "the real game companies".

        The box and the wrapping are irrelevant. It's where the money goes that matters, because there's a limited supply of it.

        Just because Apple doesn't have the foothold that MS, Sony and Nintendo have, doesn't mean they're not a contender. All those companies know they are, and they're all jealous of the App Store's unstoppable success.

      • spiffyone

        "And it's almost all being spent on games, which is - as you are so sure of - is the domain of "the real game companies"."

        Not once did I state that, so I kindly ask that you avoid attributing statements to me that were not stated at all. Thank you.

        What I am merely stating is a known fact: there is only indirect, not direct, competition between mobile platforms that are viable for games like iTouch/Phone, Zune, Android, etc. and the dedicated portable game systems like PSP and DS. It is the same type of "competition" that exists between the home game consoles (dedicated primarily to gaming) and the PC platform as concerns gaming. It's indirect competition, which is why no industry analysis firm directly compares sales of PC games against sales of 360,PS3 and Wii games (instead they compare the latter to each other, and in a separate section might detail PC game sales). Same deal with mobile platforms and portable game systems. No analysis firm used by the industry directly compares them all. Even Apple, when it shows iPhone apps sales, usually compares them to other mobile platforms, as that is the direct competition.

        A sizable chunk of consumers in the market for an iTouch/Phone are NOT necessarily in the market for games. Consider that the iTouch/Phone games, while individually constituting the largest percentage of purchases on the App Store still only accounts for a relatively small percentage of total iTouch/Phone consumer base purchases compared to the combined groups of other app purchases, music downloads, etc. That is, games sell quite well...but they aren't the MAIN selling point, and this is why it's not a game system but a viable platform for games.

        All game system owners buy games. All PSP and DS owners buy games (or at the very least are PRIMARILY in the market for games). All iTouch/Phone owners do not buy games, but a sizable enough percentage do that game companies cater to that percentage. Now, maybe that percentage may come to rival the number of owners of dedicated devices. I concede that possibility. That said, there is much to be said about knowing exactly what the consumer base desires. Dedicated game systems provide that assurance for game companies, and that's why they will never go away nor be in direct competition with platforms that have a much broader range of consumers, many of whom are not game consumers.

  • benjamin

    i live in belgium,about the only country where "koppel verkoop" is forbidden,this means that you can't sell 2 things at the same time to discount on one of them.in belgium,the new iphone costs 614.54€ about a big 1000$ but my 32GB 3GS wil be simlockfree,thus global unlocked.i'm verry exited about this one,my main reason for this purchase is the gaming part,wich seams to be much improved.

  • Greg

    "Neither are they connected 24/7! THAT'S the big draw. Nor can they handle pain-free browsing, Email, seamless software distribution or updates…. "

    Absolutely true, however, I don't think the mass gaming public (most likely mostly 10 - 20 year olds) have the disposable income to blow on an iphone for gaming. I don't know too many parents willing to shell out the cash, and the monthly commitment for a 12 year old to have an iphone... a PSP or a DS though... probably. :)

  • benjamin

    i live in belgium,about the only country where "koppel verkoop" is forbidden,this means that you can't sell 2 things at the same time to discount on one of them.in belgium,the new iphone costs 614.54€ about a big 1000$ but my 32GB 3GS wil be simlockfree,thus global unlocked.i'm verry exited about this one,my main reason for this purchase is the gaming part,wich seams to be much improved.

  • Greg

    "Neither are they connected 24/7! THAT'S the big draw. Nor can they handle pain-free browsing, Email, seamless software distribution or updates…. "

    Absolutely true, however, I don't think the mass gaming public (most likely mostly 10 - 20 year olds) have the disposable income to blow on an iphone for gaming. I don't know too many parents willing to shell out the cash, and the monthly commitment for a 12 year old to have an iphone... a PSP or a DS though... probably. :)

  • benjamin

    Henrique says:
    June 19, 2009 at 2:39 pm

    If you buy a good phone, GPS, camera and portable console, it'll cost a lot more than $500.
    The iPhone does all that pretty well, IMO. And if Real Racing already delivers graphics easily comparable to the PSP, I can only dream about what the devs will do with this new GPU.

    you're totaly right,a descent gps with a reasonable screan will cost about 300 bucks, a psp/ds/gaming console 150 bucks,a pda 400 bucks a digital camera:50-100 bucks,
    i know what i'm going to schoose.

  • benjamin

    Henrique says:
    June 19, 2009 at 2:39 pm

    If you buy a good phone, GPS, camera and portable console, it'll cost a lot more than $500.
    The iPhone does all that pretty well, IMO. And if Real Racing already delivers graphics easily comparable to the PSP, I can only dream about what the devs will do with this new GPU.

    you're totaly right,a descent gps with a reasonable screan will cost about 300 bucks, a psp/ds/gaming console 150 bucks,a pda 400 bucks a digital camera:50-100 bucks,
    i know what i'm going to schoose.

  • Icepulse

    "You can't simply compare the iPhone to the PSP or DS. It is true that that the iPhone is a remarkable phone/handheld gaming device. However, it is still primarily a phone. It will never be up to par with the PSP or DS because simply put, it is not primarily a gaming device."

    With logic like that, who am I to disagree?

    • spiffyone

      He's correct, but didn't word it correctly. It's not that iPhone is "primarily a phone" (it really isn't, tbqh): it's that the iPhone platform (that being both iPhone and iPod touch, as they are the same base platform) are in the mobile market. PSP and DS are in the portable game system market. Those are two very different markets. Think of it as PC vs. video game home consoles. The latter are directly targeting a particular consumer (gamers). The former isn't. Yes, there are gamers who own PCs, but there are a ton of non-gamers as well because gaming is not a primary focus of the platform, but rather the focus is on doing whatever the end user wants. It's the same type of thing with mobile platforms. iTouch/Phone as a platform is competing with similar platforms (Windows Mobile/Zune, Android, etc.), NOT with specific targeted devices like game systems despite the fact that iTouch/Phone, and other mobile platforms, are viable platforms for games.

  • Icepulse

    "You can't simply compare the iPhone to the PSP or DS. It is true that that the iPhone is a remarkable phone/handheld gaming device. However, it is still primarily a phone. It will never be up to par with the PSP or DS because simply put, it is not primarily a gaming device."

    With logic like that, who am I to disagree?

    • spiffyone

      He's correct, but didn't word it correctly. It's not that iPhone is "primarily a phone" (it really isn't, tbqh): it's that the iPhone platform (that being both iPhone and iPod touch, as they are the same base platform) are in the mobile market. PSP and DS are in the portable game system market. Those are two very different markets. Think of it as PC vs. video game home consoles. The latter are directly targeting a particular consumer (gamers). The former isn't. Yes, there are gamers who own PCs, but there are a ton of non-gamers as well because gaming is not a primary focus of the platform, but rather the focus is on doing whatever the end user wants. It's the same type of thing with mobile platforms. iTouch/Phone as a platform is competing with similar platforms (Windows Mobile/Zune, Android, etc.), NOT with specific targeted devices like game systems despite the fact that iTouch/Phone, and other mobile platforms, are viable platforms for games.

  • it's friday man

    Picked up a 16GB 3G S this morning. Worth it for the compass alone if you use maps a lot; I love it. GPS doesn't seem any better though - it still thinks I live somewhere else depending on which room I'm in...but I can see some cool uses for the compass in all sorts of apps & games.

    And audio seems very poor on video recording, which might be a big deal to some folk - my old SE cybershot phone (K800) from 2004/5 had a far superior mic. Video quality is the saving grace, it's as good as everyone says.

    Best of all, speed :) Not just the UI, but a lot of those games that were previously borderline playable are now well worth revisiting.

  • it's friday man

    Picked up a 16GB 3G S this morning. Worth it for the compass alone if you use maps a lot; I love it. GPS doesn't seem any better though - it still thinks I live somewhere else depending on which room I'm in...but I can see some cool uses for the compass in all sorts of apps & games.

    And audio seems very poor on video recording, which might be a big deal to some folk - my old SE cybershot phone (K800) from 2004/5 had a far superior mic. Video quality is the saving grace, it's as good as everyone says.

    Best of all, speed :) Not just the UI, but a lot of those games that were previously borderline playable are now well worth revisiting.

  • spiffyone

    And we're most likely not going to see many, if any, 3Gs specific games for quite some time. Firstly because apparently it's much tougher to dev for, and secondly (and probably more importantly, tbqh) the install base will be tiny for quite some time, dwarfed by the current iTouch/Phone line.

  • spiffyone

    And we're most likely not going to see many, if any, 3Gs specific games for quite some time. Firstly because apparently it's much tougher to dev for, and secondly (and probably more importantly, tbqh) the install base will be tiny for quite some time, dwarfed by the current iTouch/Phone line.

  • samthelion

    Having 3GS-only games or not is a main issue. This is why Nintendo after years of DS still releases the DSi with the same poor CPU.

    • it's friday man

      I'll not contest that, but Nintendo can get away with it... Apple customers tend to expect more, with more on top, at every keynote.

      It probably won't make much difference for this generation... next year might be a different story if the divide widens.

      • spiffyone

        Yes, let's compare an actual next gen product (3Gs) to a redesign (DSi). >_>

        I still say Apple did this too soon, btw.

      • samthelion

        Yep, you are right. I think it will be interesting to see what happens. It's just something unexpected for the standards of the gaming industry, so it's difficult to predict.

      • samthelion

        and spiffy you are just stressing my point. Apple launches a next-gen product, Nintendo redesigns, even if Nintendo's product is much older. This clearly comes from their different backgrounds. Apple is not a gaming industry, but it's a fact that it entered also in the gaming business, bringing in new rules and breaking some long-time conventions to which gamers were used.

      • spiffyone

        no, samthelion, it merely stresses that Apple's iTouch/Phone product line is in the mobile market, as the life span of such products is far shorter than the traditional 5-6 (or slightly longer) year model used by the dedicated game system industry (whether home console or mobile). It's expected that mobile platforms get a major upgrade in tech every two years or so. But that sort of thing is virtual suicide in the dedicated game industry.

        Apple simply does the redesigns (which it calls "new gen" products erroneously, IMHO) on a vastly accelerated scale (once a year or so). iPod touch 1st "gen" to 2nd was simply a minor redesign. This 3Gs is an actual next gen product, however. Accelerated due to the dynamics of the mobile market. Apple isn't breaking the "rules" of the game industry in regard to game systems because it isn't a game system that they're peddling, but a mobile platform that is viable for games. There's a difference in markets.

      • samthelion

        you keep repeating the same phrase that actually doesn't make much sense. Mobile platform viable for games and handheld console games were different markets before simply because previous mobile platform viable for games were crap. With the iphone and ipod touches these markets converge. I believe that many traditional gamers will buy the 3GS or a future "ipod touch S" and maybe not the PSP GO. So they will find themselves in this different context in which gaming devices get updated more frequently than they are used to, and it will be interesting to see how this works. This is all I was saying from the start.

      • spiffyone

        But the markets remain different any way you shake it sam.

        The fact is that, again, all consumers in the market for a PSP and DS are in the market to play games. Not all consumers for an iTouch/Phone are in the market to consume games. It's, again, akin to the PC market compared to the video game home console market. Slightly different market and different end user.

  • samthelion

    Having 3GS-only games or not is a main issue. This is why Nintendo after years of DS still releases the DSi with the same poor CPU.

    • it's friday man

      I'll not contest that, but Nintendo can get away with it... Apple customers tend to expect more, with more on top, at every keynote.

      It probably won't make much difference for this generation... next year might be a different story if the divide widens.

      • spiffyone

        Yes, let's compare an actual next gen product (3Gs) to a redesign (DSi). >_>

        I still say Apple did this too soon, btw.

      • samthelion

        Yep, you are right. I think it will be interesting to see what happens. It's just something unexpected for the standards of the gaming industry, so it's difficult to predict.

      • samthelion

        and spiffy you are just stressing my point. Apple launches a next-gen product, Nintendo redesigns, even if Nintendo's product is much older. This clearly comes from their different backgrounds. Apple is not a gaming industry, but it's a fact that it entered also in the gaming business, bringing in new rules and breaking some long-time conventions to which gamers were used.

      • spiffyone

        no, samthelion, it merely stresses that Apple's iTouch/Phone product line is in the mobile market, as the life span of such products is far shorter than the traditional 5-6 (or slightly longer) year model used by the dedicated game system industry (whether home console or mobile). It's expected that mobile platforms get a major upgrade in tech every two years or so. But that sort of thing is virtual suicide in the dedicated game industry.

        Apple simply does the redesigns (which it calls "new gen" products erroneously, IMHO) on a vastly accelerated scale (once a year or so). iPod touch 1st "gen" to 2nd was simply a minor redesign. This 3Gs is an actual next gen product, however. Accelerated due to the dynamics of the mobile market. Apple isn't breaking the "rules" of the game industry in regard to game systems because it isn't a game system that they're peddling, but a mobile platform that is viable for games. There's a difference in markets.

      • samthelion

        you keep repeating the same phrase that actually doesn't make much sense. Mobile platform viable for games and handheld console games were different markets before simply because previous mobile platform viable for games were crap. With the iphone and ipod touches these markets converge. I believe that many traditional gamers will buy the 3GS or a future "ipod touch S" and maybe not the PSP GO. So they will find themselves in this different context in which gaming devices get updated more frequently than they are used to, and it will be interesting to see how this works. This is all I was saying from the start.

      • spiffyone

        But the markets remain different any way you shake it sam.

        The fact is that, again, all consumers in the market for a PSP and DS are in the market to play games. Not all consumers for an iTouch/Phone are in the market to consume games. It's, again, akin to the PC market compared to the video game home console market. Slightly different market and different end user.

  • bobby

    Some of us would just be happy to see all the existing apps continue to work properly on the new OS. = It's a shame how it broke many apps.

  • bobby

    Some of us would just be happy to see all the existing apps continue to work properly on the new OS. =\ It's a shame how it broke many apps.

  • http://www.sleekgames.net Psionic

    Well.. it also will have the side effect of cleaning the unsupported crap out of the app store.

  • http://www.sleekgames.net Psionic

    Well.. it also will have the side effect of cleaning the unsupported crap out of the app store.

  • Tower Defender

    Where was that pic taken? Those structures looks so familiar.

  • Tower Defender

    Where was that pic taken? Those structures looks so familiar.

  • peter

    does anyone know what the pricing range for Australia is?

  • peter

    does anyone know what the pricing range for Australia is?

  • Fokion

    The DS is the least powerful handheld console on the market. That doesn't stop it from being far and away the most succesful.

  • Fokion

    The DS is the least powerful handheld console on the market. That doesn't stop it from being far and away the most succesful.