Category Archives: Strategy

Ndemic's Plague Inc. [$0.99] has seen an overwhelming amount of support since its release in May of 2012. Numerous updates have added new content to the game at a steady pace, and the enormous success of the game has even resulted in a partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which saw the game's creator speak at the CDC as well as some actual CDC-related content for the game. Today Ndemic has announced another partnership, this time with 20th Century Fox that'll see the Simian Flu featured in the upcoming film Dawn of the Planet of the Apes added into Plague Inc...

'Desert Fox' Review - Attempt To Do What The Fox Could Not

Erwin Rommel, also known as the Desert Fox, has got to be one of the more interesting figures of World War 2. For starters, he's a well-regarded man in spite of fighting for Nazi Germany in the war, a rare enough achievement for him to gain distinction on alone. He was an incredibly skilled military commander, demonstrating an uncanny level of strategy, especially in the challenging desert climates of North Africa. His conscience was such that his ultimate downfall only came about because he was part of the plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler, and even after being discovered, he was allowed to die with some dignity, with his family's safety assured. He was beloved by the people of Germany, highly respected by his enemies, and overall quite the military genius. For those reasons, and more, the world has seen fit to give him one of our highest awards: video games based on him and his exploits...

Uber Entertainment's Toy Rush [Free], their free-to-play tower defense take on the Clash of Clans strategy genre, has gotten a content update. There's a new Block Totem tower that blocks the usage of enemy action cards, and heals towers that are nearby. The Focus Fire action card makes your attacking toys focus on a specific target spot. Pack boosters can help you get rare cards. ..

Hunted Cow's been a bit nostalgic this year. After making a big return to World War 2 with the recent Tank Battle: East Front [$2.99] series and revisiting ancient warfare with Ancient Battle: Alexander [$9.99], it's making another return to the American Civil War, last visited in Civil War: 1862 [$4.99] late last year. For some, it's probably a bit too soon to go back to a very familiar period, but I'm just happy to get a break from tanks in my mobile war games. As you might expect given the frequency of Hunted Cow's releases, Civil War: 1864 [$9.99] feels very iterative, but there are a couple of differences beyond the expected slate of new missions...

While I enjoy a big budget RPG production like any fan of the genre does, I'm also a pretty big fan of checking out what the little guys are up to. That's because when it comes to RPGs, perhaps more than most genres, you don't need a huge budget or a massive studio to realize your gameplay ideas. It doesn't hurt, mind you, but it's arguable that the very core of video game RPGs is in realizing abstract ideas through more practical means. It's why companies like Atlus and Falcom who work with budgets many times smaller than someone like Square-Enix are still able to capture the hearts of RPG lovers just the same. To be honest, finding an innovative RPG with ideas that connect well with me tends to be a bit rare, but the enjoyment I get from them when I do find them makes the search more than worthwhile...

There are many things you could accuse the Trese Brothers, developers of Star Traders 4X: Empires in Exile [Free / $4.99] of with regards to how they handle their games. You can't ever say that they lack ambition or industriousness, however, and that has never been more apparent than with this latest release. Although most of their past mobile work has been for Android mobile devices, the Trese Brothers have released two games before this on iOS. Their first release, a couple of years ago, was Star Traders RPG [Free / $2.99], a sci-fi themed trading game with an impressive amount of universe lore. Then, several months ago, they released Heroes of Steel RPG [Free / $3.99], an interesting turn-based strategy RPG that again featured an impressive amount of world-building. Both games were in many ways too deep for their own good at times, and both were pretty rough around the edges at release. On the positive side, both have received a mind-boggling amount of updates in response to player feedback...

Many of the games in the puzzle genre of video games are evolutions of classic board games, with various alterations made to the rules to simply, complicate, or simply diversify. Of course, this is really just carrying on the work that was happening in physical board games themselves before video games came along and blew a huge chunk out of that market. For example, Reversi, or Othello as it's popularly known, is a simplified version of the ancient Chinese game, Go. The latest game from Synesthetic [$2.99] creator Alex Dantis, Polygon Evolution [Free], is also a variation on Go, simplified in some ways, complicated in others, and like its ancestor, a lot more fun to play against a human than a computer...

Some puzzle games have such simple mechanics that just about anyone can pick them up and do fairly well without too much effort. Games like these usually rely on something external to the mechanics to add a greater challenge, such as a timer or giving you a penalty for making mistakes. Perfect Paths [$2.99], from Lums [$2.99] developer Hyperbolic Magnetism, is not one of those games. In the broad sense, the rules aren't that hard to understand. You've got a certain number of different colored blocks that each need to be moved to a matching-colored goal. You do this by drawing the paths each block should move, then press the button to execute your plan. If all goes well, you can enjoy watching each block make its way to its final location, all according to your brilliant strategy...

Three years ago, iOS gamers were treated to Great Little War Game [$1.99] from Rubicon Development. It was perhaps one of the more truthful titles seen in gaming, and it was a big hit with us here at TouchArcade. Two years ago, the game got an immense sequel in Great Big War Game [$2.99], which added just about anything fans of the first game could have asked for, including online multiplayer. After that, things went quiet for the series, and it seemed like Rubicon had moved on to other things, like last year's Combat Monsters [Free]. They haven't been shy about discussing the somewhat sluggish performance of that last game in the marketplace, and I wouldn't be surprised if that blow informed Great Little War Game 2 [$2.99] right from its very existence on. That said, I don't really care how or why we got another game in the series. As a pretty big fan of both of the previous games, I'm just happy to see the series back...

If you're a fan of strategy games, then the name Slitherine needs no introductions. If you're not, all you really need to know about these guys is that they have been around the block a few times when it comes to this genre. They've made a board game, a bunch of computer games, quite a few iPad games, and only a few iPhone games, almost all dealing with the subject of war. Now, when it comes to strategy war games, certain wars are covered more often than others, but one of the cool things about Slitherine is that they've dabbled in a lot of unconventional settings, as seen for example in Da Vinci's Art Of War [$4.99 (HD)] on iPad. I like a game based around Napoleon, Rome, or World War 2 as much as the next guy, but it's nice to get outside the box now and then, you know?..

I'm sure, like me, you've seen many RPGs market themselves as having 100 hour quests or something outrageous like that, only to find that unless you delve into side-content, it's less than half that in almost every case. Record of Agarest War [$14.99], the latest port from HyperDevbox, makes a similar claim, but they're not shoveling manure. Though I finished my first, and I might add quite rushed, pass through the game under the 100 hour mark, it wasn't that far off, and I think it's entirely believable the average player will eclipse the century hour mark before seeing the ending. Add in the side content, and you're probably looking at 130-150 hours, if not more. If you're determined to get your dollar's worth out of a game on sheer length, you'll be hard-pressed to beat Agarest. Of course, a game running that long can be a double-edged sword, and that's definitely the case here, but I'll come back to that later in the review...

Well, it's not often I find myself having to write a second review, but here we are. A few months back, the hotly-anticipated sequel to Dungelot, surprisingly named Dungelot 2 [Free], was released on the App Store. While retaining the same basic gameplay as the original title, the sequel was quite different in a lot of ways, many of them owing to the new free-to-play structure. It was still pretty fun, but, as I said in an alternate timeline review, in most ways it represented a step back from the original game. It was also rife with bugs, including people losing out on purchased IAPs, which is basically a worst-case scenario. So, in a move that has very little precedent, developer Red Winter Software pulled the game from the App Store to rework it extensively and fix up the known issues. At last, it's seemingly ready to go again, so let's have a look and see how Dungelot 2-2 has turned out...

In August of last year, developer Full Control released Space Hulk on PC, a video game adaptation of the tabletop board game of the same name. Full Control had been hinting that their version of Space Hulk would be coming to iOS, and indeed the following December Space Hulk [$9.99 (HD)] was released for the iPad for $9.99. Today, for the first time since releasing, Space Hulk is on sale for $4.99, half off its regular price. In conjunction with the sale, Space Hulk has just received an update adding co-op multiplayer functionality, as well as a new multiplayer lobby. The game's online multiplayer works cross-platform with the Mac, Linux and PC versions of the game...

For the uninitiated, Michael Brough's 868-HACK [$5.99] is a masterpiece. It's a roguelike that's much more than it appears to be at first glance, and could be mistaken for yet another retro-inspired, throwaway dungeon crawler. It's anything but that. It's impeccably designed, brutally tough, and has enough layers of strategy to suffocate an elephant. In our review of 868-HACK we likened the game to an onion, as once you peel off one layer you're left with another, then another, then another and with every game you're left with new knowledge and are better equipped to excel on a subsequent try. It's the kind of game that you feel like you're always getting better at, but that you'll never truly be able to fully master, because it's just so damn deep...

Gorgeous Strategy Board Game Hybrid 'Armello' Coming to iPad Next Year

Armello sounds like a candy bar stuffed with caramel and, like, nougat, but it's actually a gorgeous strategy game coming to iPad next year. Developed by Australian indie conglomerate League of Geeks, Armello is a digital board and card game about the power and politics of a mystical animal kingdom of the same name. A mysterious disease called Rot has driven the once-benevolent (lion) king mad, and Armello's various clans rise up in response. It sounds simultaneously obvious and dopey when you say it out loud, but Armello's lush and vibrant art direction makes the premise easy to buy into...

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