Category Archives: Strategy

Lucky Frame Bringing Roguelike Puzzler 'The Nightmare Cooperative' to iOS

Lucky Frame, the Edinbugensian studio behind Bad Hotel [$1.99], Wave Trip [$0.99], and Gentlemen! [$4.99 (HD)] (all of which we loved), are brining their newest game to iOS. ..

Space Bears Bring Abstract Strategy to iOS with Upcoming 'Kingdoms'

Perhaps unfortunately, French indie duo Space Bears' first project isn't about a roaming sleuth of star-faring ursids. Instead, the Paris-based combo are making Kingdoms, a two-player strategy game about capturing tiles, fortifying positions, and wresting territory away from your enemies...

A year ago yesterday, Mighty Rabbit Studios released Breach & Clear [$3.99] into the App Store, a tactical strategy game built for mobile devices. Now, to celebrate that first anniversary, Mighty Rabbit has dropped the price of Breach & Clear to free for this weekend. Our original review of Breach & Clear talked about the flashes of brilliance showcased in the game, but we were really put off by how much content in the game was labeled as "coming soon." It just felt like an unfinished product, and we can only really review the game as it exists at the time of review. To Mighty Rabbit's credit, they've since updated the game numerous times, not just adding in the "coming soon" content but also making many tweaks and improvements to the overall experience...

I have a confession: I never finished Mi-Clos Studio's engrossing space-travel roguelike Out There [$3.99]...

The original Civilization Revolution [$2.99] represented acclaimed designer Sid Meier's attempt to make the Civilization series more appealing to a wider range of people than before. The main Civilization series is extremely well-known and beloved for being an incredibly deep game series, with each game offering nearly infinite replay value. The aim with Revolution was to take the core concepts of Civ and make a game that wasn't as intimidating by streamlining certain aspects and reducing the average length of each game. While hardcore fans of the original series were a bit mixed on the results, it was fairly well-received overall. Originally releasing on PC and various consoles, it made a big splash on iOS with a slightly late port in 2009. The game was a great match for mobiles, offering a reasonably deep gameplay experience that fit the stop and go nature of many mobile gamers. It was also quite well-maintained by publisher 2K Games, and was still receiving occasional updates as recently as late last year...

When Square Enix Montreal announced Hitman GO [$4.99] back in February, I was skeptical to say the least. Mobile hardware is pretty beefy nowadays and I had no doubt that a full-blown, "console-like" Hitman game would work just fine on iOS. So why was Hitman GO set to be a turn-based board game of all things? Luckily for me and everyone else, I was way off base questioning Squeenix Montreal's decision, as they totally nailed it with Hitman GO. While certainly not a traditional Hitman game, Hitman GO still captures the essence of the series and provides a smart and challenging puzzle-type experience...

Ndemic's Plague Inc. [$0.99] has seen an overwhelming amount of support since its release in May of 2012. Numerous updates have added new content to the game at a steady pace, and the enormous success of the game has even resulted in a partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which saw the game's creator speak at the CDC as well as some actual CDC-related content for the game. Today Ndemic has announced another partnership, this time with 20th Century Fox that'll see the Simian Flu featured in the upcoming film Dawn of the Planet of the Apes added into Plague Inc...

'Desert Fox' Review - Attempt To Do What The Fox Could Not

Erwin Rommel, also known as the Desert Fox, has got to be one of the more interesting figures of World War 2. For starters, he's a well-regarded man in spite of fighting for Nazi Germany in the war, a rare enough achievement for him to gain distinction on alone. He was an incredibly skilled military commander, demonstrating an uncanny level of strategy, especially in the challenging desert climates of North Africa. His conscience was such that his ultimate downfall only came about because he was part of the plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler, and even after being discovered, he was allowed to die with some dignity, with his family's safety assured. He was beloved by the people of Germany, highly respected by his enemies, and overall quite the military genius. For those reasons, and more, the world has seen fit to give him one of our highest awards: video games based on him and his exploits...

Uber Entertainment's Toy Rush [Free], their free-to-play tower defense take on the Clash of Clans strategy genre, has gotten a content update. There's a new Block Totem tower that blocks the usage of enemy action cards, and heals towers that are nearby. The Focus Fire action card makes your attacking toys focus on a specific target spot. Pack boosters can help you get rare cards. ..

Hunted Cow's been a bit nostalgic this year. After making a big return to World War 2 with the recent Tank Battle: East Front [$1.99] series and revisiting ancient warfare with Ancient Battle: Alexander [$3.99], it's making another return to the American Civil War, last visited in Civil War: 1862 [$1.99] late last year. For some, it's probably a bit too soon to go back to a very familiar period, but I'm just happy to get a break from tanks in my mobile war games. As you might expect given the frequency of Hunted Cow's releases, Civil War: 1864 [$4.99] feels very iterative, but there are a couple of differences beyond the expected slate of new missions...

While I enjoy a big budget RPG production like any fan of the genre does, I'm also a pretty big fan of checking out what the little guys are up to. That's because when it comes to RPGs, perhaps more than most genres, you don't need a huge budget or a massive studio to realize your gameplay ideas. It doesn't hurt, mind you, but it's arguable that the very core of video game RPGs is in realizing abstract ideas through more practical means. It's why companies like Atlus and Falcom who work with budgets many times smaller than someone like Square-Enix are still able to capture the hearts of RPG lovers just the same. To be honest, finding an innovative RPG with ideas that connect well with me tends to be a bit rare, but the enjoyment I get from them when I do find them makes the search more than worthwhile...

There are many things you could accuse the Trese Brothers, developers of Star Traders 4X: Empires in Exile [Free / $4.99] of with regards to how they handle their games. You can't ever say that they lack ambition or industriousness, however, and that has never been more apparent than with this latest release. Although most of their past mobile work has been for Android mobile devices, the Trese Brothers have released two games before this on iOS. Their first release, a couple of years ago, was Star Traders RPG [Free / $2.99], a sci-fi themed trading game with an impressive amount of universe lore. Then, several months ago, they released Heroes of Steel RPG [Free / $3.99], an interesting turn-based strategy RPG that again featured an impressive amount of world-building. Both games were in many ways too deep for their own good at times, and both were pretty rough around the edges at release. On the positive side, both have received a mind-boggling amount of updates in response to player feedback...

Many of the games in the puzzle genre of video games are evolutions of classic board games, with various alterations made to the rules to simply, complicate, or simply diversify. Of course, this is really just carrying on the work that was happening in physical board games themselves before video games came along and blew a huge chunk out of that market. For example, Reversi, or Othello as it's popularly known, is a simplified version of the ancient Chinese game, Go. The latest game from Synesthetic [$2.99] creator Alex Dantis, Polygon Evolution [Free], is also a variation on Go, simplified in some ways, complicated in others, and like its ancestor, a lot more fun to play against a human than a computer...

Some puzzle games have such simple mechanics that just about anyone can pick them up and do fairly well without too much effort. Games like these usually rely on something external to the mechanics to add a greater challenge, such as a timer or giving you a penalty for making mistakes. Perfect Paths [$2.99], from Lums [$2.99] developer Hyperbolic Magnetism, is not one of those games. In the broad sense, the rules aren't that hard to understand. You've got a certain number of different colored blocks that each need to be moved to a matching-colored goal. You do this by drawing the paths each block should move, then press the button to execute your plan. If all goes well, you can enjoy watching each block make its way to its final location, all according to your brilliant strategy...

Three years ago, iOS gamers were treated to Great Little War Game [$1.99] from Rubicon Development. It was perhaps one of the more truthful titles seen in gaming, and it was a big hit with us here at TouchArcade. Two years ago, the game got an immense sequel in Great Big War Game [$2.99], which added just about anything fans of the first game could have asked for, including online multiplayer. After that, things went quiet for the series, and it seemed like Rubicon had moved on to other things, like last year's Combat Monsters [Free]. They haven't been shy about discussing the somewhat sluggish performance of that last game in the marketplace, and I wouldn't be surprised if that blow informed Great Little War Game 2 [$2.99] right from its very existence on. That said, I don't really care how or why we got another game in the series. As a pretty big fan of both of the previous games, I'm just happy to see the series back...

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