Category Archives: Strategy

If you've enjoyed Out There [$1.99], the beautiful space exploration game by Mi-Clos Studios, I have some very good news for you. The game's developers have decided to continue expanding the game, taking advantage of all the work they did in rebuilding the game into the Ω Edition. To that end, they've decided to release a series of updates called Multiverse (cool name, too). Each update will add small improvements but, more importantly for most of us, will also bring new game modes and content. And, as is Mi-Clos Studios' habit, the update will be free if you already own the game. So, free content, hard to complain about that, isn't it?..

It's already been a pretty intense day of new iOS games, but before we've even had a chance to recover there's a late arrival that a lot of people having been waiting for: Sarah Northway's Rebuild 3: Gangs of Deadsville [$4.99]. After a couple of device compatibility snafus that pushed the previously planned release dates back, Rebuild 3 has finally found its way to the App Store!..




Not every game needs to have tight design. Those might be blasphemous words coming from a game reviewer, but there's truth in them. I have great respect for games where every little aspect has been placed to work in perfect harmony with every other part, but games can also be unbalanced, messy things and still be a heck of a lot of fun to play. That's the case with Demon's Rise [$2.99], a turn-based strategy RPG from newcomer Wave Light Games. It draws its principle mechanics from popular SRPGs like Warhammer Quest [$4.99] and X-COM [$9.99], lets you form your party from a whopping 25 different characters each with their own skills, then throws a pile of content at you to merrily hack, zap, and smash your way through. It's horrifically unbalanced, but it's hard to care much about that as you guide your wacky group of characters through the monster-filled dungeons...

There have been a lot of weird crossovers throughout the history of entertainment, and only half of them involve Angry Birds.  Remember when Inspector Gadget showed up on the Super Mario Bros. Super Show, or that time when Archie met the Punisher, or when the Harlem Globetrotters helped Scooby-Doo and the gang solve a mystery? If you look at it that way, perhaps Pocket God Vs Desert Ashes [$4.99] isn't that strange after all. Still, a combination of Bolt Creative's Pocket God [$0.99] and Nine Tales Digital's Mecho Wars/Desert Ashes probably wouldn't be the first team-up you would imagine for either franchise, and it certainly begs a question or two. How exactly could they reconcile the former's simple god game mechanics with the latter's Advance Wars-inspired turn-based strategy?..

Way back in the before times, when I was a little fellow attending elementary school, I often found myself doodling on the paper in front of me. Well, to be honest, I did that in junior high school, high school, and university, too, but that's neither here nor there. The point is, my imagination wandered frequently, and conspired with my hand to try to keep the whole system from going to sleep. I feel like I drew all the standard things: dinosaurs, super heroes, video game characters, the screaming souls of the damned as they burned in searing agony for all eternity, fighter jets, ALF, and of course, space ship battles. I would doodle an assortment of ships on the left, another group on the right, then simulate their battles. Sentinel Command [$6.99 (HD)] reminds me of those hand-sketched battles, but with rules, challenge, and all kinds of good things like that...

As you might know, Shenandoah Studio, one of the premier strategy game developers on mobile, had gone silent after being acquired by Slitherine, surfacing only briefly last April. Now, we finally have concrete info about the company's plans. Battle of the Bulge [$9.99], Shenandoah's first game and easily one of the best strategy games on mobile, will relaunch on September 17th on PC, iPhone, iPad, and Mac. The game's engine has been ported to a different technology to allow multi-platform support, and a cross-platform multiplayer system has been added along with Slitherine's new tournaments system launched last month. The game also features a re-designed AI for both Axis and Allies sides, one of the very few criticisms some had about Battle of the Bulge, and a new PC-like save feature that offers more slots per battle, a welcome change since the original game had one save slot only...

When you sit down to write a review of the mobile port of an older PC game, it can get tricky. As times change, so does the context in which we view different games, and playing the 2004 PC Game Rollercoaster Tycoon 3 (RCT 3) [$4.99] on my iPad and iPhone in 2015 is definitely an interesting, and quite new, experience in itself. Add to that my sense of nostalgia when playing games I used to play back in the day when they came out (although when it came to management games, I was more into the older Theme Hospital than the RollerCoaster Tycoon games), and reviewing a game like RCT 3 becomes an interesting exercise in detachment; I have to make sure I review what I see and play rather than what I remember...

You might have heard of a tiny little game called Clash of Clans [Free], a game that has spawned many imitators, has been raking in the dough since its release in 2012, and is currently sitting nicely in second place in the App Store's Top Grossing Games. But how did this game manage to become so popular that everyone uses it as a stand-in phrase for "very popular and very successful mobile game?" Well, Clash of Clans' server programmer, Jonas Collaros, revealed what he sees as the secret behind the game's success. In the most recent Game Developers Conference, Collaros claimed that the secret to Supercell's success is the company's simple principle: the game should be free. That reason alone, always according to Collaros, has enabled gamers to download the game and make it a part of their daily lives...

Tactile Wars [Free] had, how shall I put this mildly, a rocky start in life. The game went through what I suppose was a successful soft launch and then got released with plenty of App Store fanfare, grabbing the much-coveted Editor's Choice Award from Apple, an award that can really take a game's revenue into the stratosphere. Unfortunately for the game, the award had pretty much that precise effect, and I say unfortunately because the great influx of players knackered the game's servers to the point where it became literally unplayable. All players would see was a "Connection is Lost" little sign informing them of their current inability to join this online-only game. In a way, Tactile Wars' predicament was reminiscent of that of many recent AAA console and PC games that tried to go online-only (looking at you, Simcity) only to realize soon after launch that servers are fickle little creatures, bound to melt into a puddle when you need them most...

If there is one thing an iPad is definitely great for, it’s digital board and card games. Such games can get a little crowded with the user interface. Especially tactics heavy turn based strategy games in the vein of Space Hulk [$4.99 (HD)] and the Hunters [$4.99] series. Hey! Speaking of those titles, I played a lovely little strategy game recently that is basically their illegitimate love child! It’s called Legions of Steel [$9.99 (HD)], and it offers an extremely diverse array of strategic gameplay exclusive on the iPad...

If you like strategy games even a bit, then you probably already know all about Mode 7 Game's Frozen Synapse, the ultra-stylish and ultra-demanding turn-based strategy game that really stood out when it was originally released on the PC and then ported to iOS. The game was incredibly unforgiving, which was part of its charm as it rewarded meticulous planning. Now, Double Eleven had decided to brings its remake, Frozen Synapse Prime [$4.99], to iOS after the Steam and Vita release. Double Eleven took Frozen Synapse and redesigned it to make it more accessible while still retaining the original game's charm. The game was received quite well, with many players claiming they prefer this version of the game over the original...

If you loaded up the App Store around 2:00 PM central yesterday when the new App Store features come up, you may have noticed that Tactile Wars [Free] was the Editor's Choice this week. The game's been in soft launch for a while now, and has just now gone global, but it seems like that soft launch didn't prepare developer Ankama and publisher DOFUS for the game's launch, as the big feature caused the servers to not work. So Apple unpersoned the game – it's no longer featured and it no longer has its prominent Editor's Choice banner. If you search for the game on the App Store, it still shows its Editor's Choice label, but the game isn't there any more on the front page...

We've been hearing about a Chapter 3 update for Pixelbite's incredibly awesome dual-stick action game Space Marshals [$4.99] ever since it was first unveiled in June. Pixelbite promised a heavier emphasis on stealth gameplay in Chapter 3 along with an assortment of new enemies, weapons and gadgets. At the end of last month, Pixelbite announced that the Chapter 3 update would arrive on August 13th, and since that's just a couple of days away they've just released a brand new trailer detailing some of the new stuff we'll be seeing in said update. Let me tell you, they have definitely lived up to their promises of delivering tons of cool new things...

'You Against Me' Review - Not the Punk Rock Band

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August 4th, 2015 12:00 PM EDT by Nathan Reinauer in $0.99, 4 stars, Card, Games, Reviews, Strategy, Universal
99¢ Buy Now

In some ways, Easy 8's You Against Me [$0.99] is an unwitting argument in favor of going free-to-play. The game is a measly 99 cents, which means you could go to a Dollar Tree, buy a single item (an incredibly uncomfortable roll of toilet paper, perhaps), and have spent more money. And yet, it seems very few people have been willing to download the game. I mean, why would you? Angry Flippin’ Birds 2 [Free] came out the same week and is cheaper than You Against Me AND toilet paper. It’s unfortunate, too, because the main draw of the game is its online multiplayer mode. I’ve been trying to find matches the past few days, but it takes an agonizingly long time to find someone else who had 99 cents to spare...

Games Workshop is no stranger to iOS. You could be forgiven if you thought that they were just cranking out one app after the other with little forethought. Much like the army, however, there is the right way, the wrong way, and the Games Workshop way to make a game. Warhammer: Arcane Magic [$9.99] definitely follows the GW script and if you like some of the other titles they have put out, especially the gold standard Warhammer Quest [$4.99], I think you'll like this one...

It's really hard to find anything bad to say about Pixelbite's Space Marshals [$4.99]. When it first burst on the scene in January this year, it took the often overdone dual-stick shooter genre to a whole new level by injecting strategy and stealth into the typically "blast everything in sight" nature of the genre. The only real drawback was that the experience didn't last too long, but Pixelbite has been rectifying that in the months since with new content updates. ..

The parade of licensed Warhammer games continues unabated with the release of Warhammer: Arcane Magic [$9.99] from Turbo Tape Games, which arrived earlier today ahead of the normal weekly new game release schedule. Hey, gotta get out ahead of that whole Angry Birds 2 thing, eh? ..

Don't judge a book by its cover, or a game by its title, they say, and in this case, they are correct because even though Wars and Battles: October War 1973 [$6.99 (HD)] might win the award for the most self-evident and slightly uninteresting title ever, the game hiding underneath that title is an interesting strategy game that covers a conflict rarely visited by wargames. ..

'Warhammer 40K: Deathwatch - Tyranid Invasion' Review - Glorious Space Hunters

Rodeo Games has a niche, and they're getting better and better at satisfying it with each new release. Their last game was a fairly well-received conversion of the classic Warhammer Quest [$4.99] board game, and their newest release is another Warhammer-themed turn-based strategy game. Of course, before all of that, Rodeo Games made their name with their excellent Hunters series of turn-based strategy games, and its from those roots that Warhammer 40K: Deathwatch [$4.99] draws most strongly from. This is basically Hunters 3, albeit with a Warhammer 40K skin. Some might frame that as a negative, but it's been a few years since the last Hunters game. I'm more than willing to entertain a sequel at this point, especially one as high-quality as Deathwatch...

Is a high level of difficulty a necessary part of a roguelike? It's something I've been thinking about a bit as I've played Alchemic Dungeons [$2.99], the latest from Rogue Ninja [$2.99] developer Q-Cumber Factory. Most genres don't factor challenge into their definitions, but I suppose the roguelike genre isn't like most others. For decades, roguelikes acted something like the horror B-movie of the games industry. There was always a very strong cult following, but outside of certain limited successes in Japan, those outside the circle rarely gave the games much attention. In recent years, things have changed, however, and that has forced a somewhat insular community to reassess exactly what it is that they get out of games using the roguelike descriptor. Alchemic Dungeons checks off all the boxes as a Japanese-style roguelike, but its main gameplay hook gives it a certain fairness that isn't typically present in this genre...

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