Category Archives: Accessories

It isn't a surprise to us that 60beat's new GamePad controller made some major waves last week. It's a proper, corded controller with a full range of button and joysticks. Also, it requires zero technical savvy. Just plug it in and go...

With it being extremely doubtful that Apple will ever roll out any kind of official game controller for use with iPhone and iPad, it's up to third-party creators and wizards to fill in the gap. 60beat is the latest we've seen to throw a hat into the ring, and its product, the GamePad, seems like a cool accessory...

At E3 back in June of this year, we got an impressive hands-on demo of the OnLive service running and playable on the iPad. In case you're not familiar, OnLive is the cloud-based gaming service that allows you to play from a fairly large selection of console and PC games by way of streaming them to an OnLive client running on your computer or a specially designed set-top box that connects to your TV. In simpler terms, it's a lot like instantly streaming movies over NetFlix, except it's video games, and you get to actually play them in real time with minimal lag if you're internet speeds are up to snuff...

Controller Update: More on the GameBone, A Bluetooth 4.0 Revelation [UPDATED]

iPhone controller accessories have been generating a good bit of news, here lately. More and more existing iOS titles are gaining physical control options via updates, and just last week we detailed the upcoming Gametel Bluetooth controller that will soon become a game-enhancing iOS controller option, alongside the iCade and iControlPad. The more the merrier, true, but long time readers may recall yet another controller we covered over a year ago that has been off the radar ever since. Does anyone remember the GameBone?..

Controller Update: The New Gametel Controller, iControlPad Analog Stick Support

While the iOS device's multitouch screen has introduced a whole new way of interacting with software and enabled game developers to rethink the fundamentals of game control, there are definitely areas where it falls short. One such area is in the on-screen approximation of a physical control stick or D-pad. Ever since we first mentioned the iControlPad, three and a half years ago, button mashers particularly frustrated by virtual controls began eagerly waiting for such physical controller accessories to arrive. This summer, the iCade and iControlPad did arrive and developers wanting to go that extra mile began adding in support for these controllers, where it made sense...

Another mini-cabinet peripheral for the iPad is coming, and the studio responsible for some of the sickest arcade games in the universe is behind the wheel of the project. Earlier this week, Taito unveiled a short promotional video for the InvaderCade. It’s basically the iCade, except with seven less buttons, a charging dock, and branded Space Invaders arcade machine art. Who knew there was room for two of these peripherals, no less three, eh?..

It was just yesterday that we heard about the Atari Arcade Duo Powered joystick peripheral for the iPad, but it looks as if the folks over at DVICE have already gotten their hands on one and given it a proper review. While yesterday’s info on this interesting add-on was limited to a small promotional shot and a single line of an App Store description, DVICE has unearthed pretty much every unknown about the Atari Arcade joystick. Unfortunately, this also leads way to some facts that make the peripheral sound not quite as cool as we initially thought it might be...

The eagle-eyed gamers over at Technabob have noticed an interesting little tidbit of information given with the latest update description to Atari’s Greatest Hits [Free]. Along with the typical bullet points of optimizations and improvements was a line declaring the game’s compatibility with the “official Atari Arcade – Duo Powered joystick”. Say what? Thankfully, Atari doesn’t leave us hanging with just a cryptic hint and actually provides a link to a product page for said joystick, along with the following promo image:..

One of our very favorite not-a-game-itself-but-is-still-gaming-related apps in the App Store is Zell Application’s Joypad Game Controller [Free]. We reviewed the Joypad this past February, and in short it turns your iOS device into a customizable virtual control pad for playing games on your computer. You just run the app on your device and then it very easily connects to a desktop client on your computer over Bluetooth or a local WiFi network. You’re then free to map the virtual buttons of the Joypad to the keyboard controls of whatever game you’re playing, or choose from the many preset configurations, and just like that you’ve got yourself a competent little game controller...

After what seemed like an eternity of waiting as we followed the iControlPad's development, we finally got our hands on one not too long ago. We mentioned a few issues that we had with the device which mostly were due to the way the current iControlPad firmware handled sending controls to the iPhone compared to how the iCade works. (This was all detailed in the previous article.) However, one of the strong suits of the iControlPad is that it seems to have an infinitely updatable firmware, and the developers behind the device recently released an update to make the iControlPad behave a lot more like the iCade-- Potentially alleviating most of the issues we had with the device's functionality...

Jamie Grove over at ThinkGeek, who was kind enough to show me around their Megaplex HQ and the original iCade prototype, just sent word that, as of 3PM EDT today, the iCade SDK is available for download, without an NDA...

A couple of weeks ago, we learned that Ten One Design was getting ready to release a smaller version of their wonderful Fling controllers for the iPad which would be suitable for use on iPhone and iPod touch devices. There was a lot of negative backlash to this announcement though, and I can sort of see why. The promo image for the Fling Mini showed that using 2 of the controllers at the same time really blocked much of the screen of the device, and it was hard to imagine how it could be practical to play games this way...

The Fling joysticks for the iPad are fantastic little contraptions. Two suction cups, a conductive joystick, and a cleverly designed plastic spiral all work in perfect harmony to provide a tactile gameplay experience that is absolutely incredible in dual stick shooters. (Or, really, any other game with a virtual joystick.) Also, it seems like every time I post about this we get comment threads full of naysayers. To that I say, if you have any doubt about the Fling, you really need to give 'em a try at any Apple store...

Last year, ThinkGeek may have outdone themselves on April Fools' day by announcing the iCade, a miniature, upright arcade cabinet complete with joystick, buttons, and a coin slot. You just slip your iPad into it and -- wham -- it's game time! It was well done joke, but it got a huge response from readers and that got the awesome folks at ThinkGeek thinking. And before long, we heard the epic news that the net's best geek-toy vendor was teaming up with ION Audio to bring that little box of goodness to market -- for real -- and with Atari as a games partner. (Like they did with their 2007 8-bit Tie. Those guys are unstoppable.)..

Earlier this year, Ten One Design released the iPad joystick accessory called the Fling. The brilliantly designed Fling is a conductive joystick nub set inside a plastic spiral, which itself is set inside an outer plastic ring. The spiral design allows the joystick to move within the outer ring which emulates the feel of an analog stick on a regular controller...

The iOS platform is home to some great input methods. Developers have utilized multitouch, tilt, and, in some cases, even the gyroscope and microphone for some incredibly creative games that would only be possible on iOS devices. But what about more traditional games that can't be controlled this way? As many of you know, that's where the highly debated virtual joysticks and buttons come into play. The problem with these virtual controls is that for as great as multitouch input is, no iOS device can offer any kind of tactile feedback for virtual controls...

So it started off like this, over at ControllerOrBust.com:..

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