Sixteen years ago, as the developers tell the tale, Rabah Shihab led a team at Baghdad University, Iraq to develop an original puzzle/platformer for the Amiga, inspired by what he saw of other games' depiction of his home country.

As he explained in an interview with Amiga Games That Weren't,

…My real dedication for this theme came during the early nineties after I saw a computer game in which you control a warplane with the goal of bombing Iraq. Putting the bombing aside (I was in Baghdad during the first gulf war and I saw the human suffering that resulted from the real bombing ), I didn't like the way they depicted Iraq in the game, as a primitive and uncivilized place. I wanted to build a game that counter that image, a game that shows the vibrant history of Mesopotamia. In Babylonian Twins, the game takes you to different historical places, from Babylon to Assyria. We relied on authentic history books to design many of the graphics in the game.

Under the extraordinary conditions caused by the economic sanctions of Iraq at that time, the first Iraqi-developed game never came to be; a well-loved, early Amiga demo release was all we ever saw. Last week however, saw the arrival of Babylonian Twins -- The Quest for Peace in Ancient Iraq [AppStore] and Babylonian Twins HD [AppStore] to the iPhone and iPad respectively, the result of a re-union of that development team.

Babylonian Twins is both a port and re-imagination of that original Amiga title. All the artwork has been re-done from scratch in rich, high definition and the original, middle eastern score and gameplay elements have all been improved. It is obvious that this has all been attended to with the utmost care, as there are no outward signs that this is in fact a port, beyond a grand style of gameplay that harkens back to the golden age of the Amiga.

The story begins with the plight of the twin princes of Babylon, imprisoned by an evil sorcerer who has cursed the city in which they live. It is a thread-bare tale told merely to give some context to the unique gameplay elements herein, foremost of which is the ability to control two protagonists with differing abilities. Blasir is able to jump higher than his brother, and is able to Dash mid-air to access hidden locations or break through weakened walls. Nasir on the other hand, has a mace capable of breaking objects and a Drill ability that destroys broken ground underfoot. Movement and attacks are handled with the standard platformer on-screen D-Pad and thumb buttons.

Nasir and Blasir are played interdependently, relying on each other's strengths to reach otherwise inaccessible locations, though only one twin is under your immediate control at any given time. When this happens, the other freezes into a statue, providing an oft-used height boost for out-of-reach areas or a weight to trigger pressure switches. In some ways this co-operative gameplay is reminiscent of another Amiga classic, The Lost Vikings, one of Blizzard's earliest titles (when they were known as Silicon and Synapse).

These simple gameplay features form the premise for some of the most interesting and expansive level designs that we have seen to date on the platform. In many ways, Babylonian Twins does away with contemporary trends in gaming, and re-instates the old-school values of a challenging, explorative platformer that refuses to hold you by the hand. There are no directional arrows or maps to point you towards the golden palm trees you must collect each level. In fact, even crucial objects such as the aforementioned broken walls and floors are easily missed unless you're paying attention. And each level is enormous-- an adventure in and of itself-- many of our completion times clocking in at around 30 minutes each.

To some, this may seem overbearing, but we thoroughly appreciated the breathe of fresh air that comes with a game that respects its players, and isn't just another title that can be waltzed through with minimal effort. Much of our time was spent exploring the colorful, wonderfully crafted middle-eastern environments; not to take in the vistas, but to puzzle out what path we had yet to take, and what vital element we were missing that was stalling our progress. That and avoiding the many pitfalls and enemies peppered across each landscape.

Babylonian Twins isn't completely unforgiving, having both a generous health bar for each twin and three lives between them to ease enemy encounters. That said, we expected that it would be replete with a checkpoint system and a resume feature to handle call-interruption. Unfortunately, these are not included to the extent they should, the latter proving especially frustrating on one occasion when 25 minutes of gameplay was wiped with the end in sight. Fortunately, the developer has indicated on our forums that this is being looked into, and that further checkpoints may be added in future versions.

This shouldn't be reason though to miss one of the most engaging platformers that we have had the pleasure of playing in a long while. While the artwork is stunning (apparently there was significant historical research behind much of the environment) and the terrific accompanying score both retro and authentically middle-eastern, the real selling point is the core gameplay. OpenFeint high scores and achievements (which include a near-impossible to find hidden trove of treasures) only accentuate a style of play that is heavy on exploration and puzzles designed to really challenge you. This won't be a game breezed through in a few short hours, but will require dedication to learn and reasoning to execute.

In true puzzle fashion, when your synapses are firing and each of the dozen levels are finally completed, your efforts pay off with a feeling of satisfaction and achievement that's second to none. That's when Babylonian Twins again shows its nature, offering two secret, additional levels when further time and life challenges are met. This is certainly a game that will remain on our iPhones and iPads for a long time to come, a sentiment shared by many of our readers who are posting their own impressions in our forums.

App Store Link: Babylonian Twins, $2.99Babylonian Twins HD, $4.99

TouchArcade Rating

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Gert

    I haven't played the game yet, but I like the stance the autor is taking, that games should not taking you as much "by the hand" as many games do, as compared to 'old school' games.

    I feel a bit fooled sometimes when a game pretends to be very hard, or 'impossible', while it's - well - a piece of cake. (Need For Speed being the most embarrisingly generous at giving compliments)

  • Gert

    I haven't played the game yet, but I like the stance the autor is taking, that games should not taking you as much "by the hand" as many games do, as compared to 'old school' games.

    I feel a bit fooled sometimes when a game pretends to be very hard, or 'impossible', while it's - well - a piece of cake. (Need For Speed being the most embarrisingly generous at giving compliments)

  • darwiniandude

    Enjoying this so far. Great game. Quite challenging :)

  • darwiniandude

    Enjoying this so far. Great game. Quite challenging :)

  • Karma32

    I don't know which one to get. I want it on my new iPad for more crisper graphics, but also want to play it on the iphone when I'm out.

    This is why the HD versions should be universal apps. The price would be much more reasonable

    Nah forget it, to make it easier, I just won't get it.

    • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

      That's the bonehead decision...

      • Karma32

        Or a smarter way. I don't want to pay for the same game twice anymore. I'm tired of it. If the HD version was universal, it would have been a much easier sell for me like Metal Gear Solid Touch was, actually I would have bought Babylonian Twins already if it was universal. I'm sure it's the same way with a lot people of have both the iPad and iPod Touch who got a lot of worthless updates to their games.

      • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

        It's a bonehead decision because it's one of the best games on the platform, and if you buy the iPhone version you can still play it on your iPad (though it won't look as nice). And if you think that not buying it is going to "force their hand" and release a universal app, you really don't understand the iPhone market at all.

      • Vinvu

        Or its a good decision, if he realizes he doesnt need it dont tell him hes a bonehead for not spending money on a digital piece of entertainment. I agree with him, its ridiculous its not universal, and sometimes its best not to waste money, even on really good games.

      • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

        First, I didn't call him a bonehead. I said that the decision is boneheaded. You may not see the distinction, but to me it's a very important one. I don't consider myself a bonehead, but I've known to make bonehead decisions on occasion (just ask my wife).

        Second, I stand by what I said: to deprive yourself of one of the best game on the platform because you don't get a shinny HD version for free is a bonehead move. You can still play it on both the iPhone and the iPad, and it's still a great game on both platforms.

      • http://scottcolbert.com Scott

        I agree with Squarezero on this one; to not buy it because you're unable to make a simple decision makes no sense. Personally, I would get it for the iPad simply because of how long getting through a level can take. I suck at platformers, but I'm having a blast with this one despite the difficulty in some areas.

        And as for this Universal crap; as someone else mentioned, it's two different device3s, you don't buy FF XIII on the PS3 and get the XBox version for free. This sense of entitlement people have, really needs to stop.

    • http://www.twitter.com/thewindburn Peter L.

      If you read the review, you'll see that this is a game generally played in long sessions. As such, I think it's a perfect game for the iPad, since you're predominantly at home when playing and the bigger screen poses a genuinely richer experience.

      Universal apps have the disadvantage of requiring a larger download for a portion of the app that won't even be used on a particular device. I'm a bit on the fence with this one personally, as it could start blowing out file sizes on the already harddrive restrictive iPhones. It's an interesting discussion point!

      • TellTale

        Interesting point. But those that would get the universal version wouldn't care as much about file sizes, they would rather be able to play the same game on both devices and only pay for the game once. Other examples of universal game apps in the store show very good file sizes when compared to when it wasn't universal. I think it would be more beneficial to the customers if the HD versions were universal. Not only would it be beficial to the customers, but would benefit sales by a good margin for the universal app and get sales from people who aren't sure about getting the game, it's a nice selling tool.

      • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

        Sprite-based games with large raster levels will always take much more memory on the iPad than on the iPhone. Higher resolution=higher memory requirements. As is, the iPad version of BT is 3 times larger than the iPhone version -- imagine if they had to include all the iPhone assets as well. Sure, this wouldn't matter much to iPad owners, but 8 gb iPhone users would probably get a bit miffed. Keep in mind that there are currently 90 times more iPhone/iPod Touch users than there are iPad users. I think the developers should prioritize the larger user base.

        That said, the idea of creating a separate universal version at a special price (as mentioned below) makes a lot of sense to me.

    • mike

      I'd buy the phone version. first.

      if you enjoy it and think that it's a good piece of entertainment - buy the HD version for an even better experience.

      when all is said and done, you'll be out less than $10, and you're supporting a developer who's making a game that you enjoy.

      If, on the other hand, you don't like it on the iphone, then skip the more expensive version.

  • Karma32

    I don't know which one to get. I want it on my new iPad for more crisper graphics, but also want to play it on the iphone when I'm out.

    This is why the HD versions should be universal apps. The price would be much more reasonable

    Nah forget it, to make it easier, I just won't get it.

    • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

      That's the bonehead decision...

      • Karma32

        Or a smarter way. I don't want to pay for the same game twice anymore. I'm tired of it. If the HD version was universal, it would have been a much easier sell for me like Metal Gear Solid Touch was, actually I would have bought Babylonian Twins already if it was universal. I'm sure it's the same way with a lot people of have both the iPad and iPod Touch who got a lot of worthless updates to their games.

      • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

        It's a bonehead decision because it's one of the best games on the platform, and if you buy the iPhone version you can still play it on your iPad (though it won't look as nice). And if you think that not buying it is going to "force their hand" and release a universal app, you really don't understand the iPhone market at all.

      • Vinvu

        Or its a good decision, if he realizes he doesnt need it dont tell him hes a bonehead for not spending money on a digital piece of entertainment. I agree with him, its ridiculous its not universal, and sometimes its best not to waste money, even on really good games.

      • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

        First, I didn't call him a bonehead. I said that the decision is boneheaded. You may not see the distinction, but to me it's a very important one. I don't consider myself a bonehead, but I've known to make bonehead decisions on occasion (just ask my wife).

        Second, I stand by what I said: to deprive yourself of one of the best game on the platform because you don't get a shinny HD version for free is a bonehead move. You can still play it on both the iPhone and the iPad, and it's still a great game on both platforms.

      • http://scottcolbert.com Scott

        I agree with Squarezero on this one; to not buy it because you're unable to make a simple decision makes no sense. Personally, I would get it for the iPad simply because of how long getting through a level can take. I suck at platformers, but I'm having a blast with this one despite the difficulty in some areas.

        And as for this Universal crap; as someone else mentioned, it's two different device3s, you don't buy FF XIII on the PS3 and get the XBox version for free. This sense of entitlement people have, really needs to stop.

    • http://www.twitter.com/thewindburn Peter L.

      If you read the review, you'll see that this is a game generally played in long sessions. As such, I think it's a perfect game for the iPad, since you're predominantly at home when playing and the bigger screen poses a genuinely richer experience.

      Universal apps have the disadvantage of requiring a larger download for a portion of the app that won't even be used on a particular device. I'm a bit on the fence with this one personally, as it could start blowing out file sizes on the already harddrive restrictive iPhones. It's an interesting discussion point!

      • TellTale

        Interesting point. But those that would get the universal version wouldn't care as much about file sizes, they would rather be able to play the same game on both devices and only pay for the game once. Other examples of universal game apps in the store show very good file sizes when compared to when it wasn't universal. I think it would be more beneficial to the customers if the HD versions were universal. Not only would it be beficial to the customers, but would benefit sales by a good margin for the universal app and get sales from people who aren't sure about getting the game, it's a nice selling tool.

      • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

        Sprite-based games with large raster levels will always take much more memory on the iPad than on the iPhone. Higher resolution=higher memory requirements. As is, the iPad version of BT is 3 times larger than the iPhone version -- imagine if they had to include all the iPhone assets as well. Sure, this wouldn't matter much to iPad owners, but 8 gb iPhone users would probably get a bit miffed. Keep in mind that there are currently 90 times more iPhone/iPod Touch users than there are iPad users. I think the developers should prioritize the larger user base.

        That said, the idea of creating a separate universal version at a special price (as mentioned below) makes a lot of sense to me.

    • mike

      I'd buy the phone version. first.

      if you enjoy it and think that it's a good piece of entertainment - buy the HD version for an even better experience.

      when all is said and done, you'll be out less than $10, and you're supporting a developer who's making a game that you enjoy.

      If, on the other hand, you don't like it on the iphone, then skip the more expensive version.

  • http://www.silentrocco.com Silent Rocco

    A lot of games are getting 2 articles on the front site, while some real gems have to stay in the dark. And please don't tell me, Above isn't good.

    • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

      The did do a preview of Above on the front page, if I remember correctly.

      • http://www.twitter.com/thewindburn Peter L.

        Yep, we did a Video preview of it too!

        With all the iPad goings on and GDC lately, there are still a few titles that were recently released that we'd like to still get reviewed. When something really great comes out though, it tends to get our attention (as in the case here).

        We get to as many as we can as promptly as we can.

      • http://www.silentrocco.com SIlent Rocco

        Previews aren't that helpful for a dev, since news from today are forgotten tomorrow. The App Store world is a very fast one.

    • arn

      If you think a game should be reviewed, email the tips address. Posting comments in other game reviews is considered spam, and is ignored (for the purposes of review)

      arn

  • http://www.silentrocco.com Silent Rocco

    A lot of games are getting 2 articles on the front site, while some real gems have to stay in the dark. And please don't tell me, Above isn't good.

    • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

      The did do a preview of Above on the front page, if I remember correctly.

      • http://www.twitter.com/thewindburn Peter L.

        Yep, we did a Video preview of it too!

        With all the iPad goings on and GDC lately, there are still a few titles that were recently released that we'd like to still get reviewed. When something really great comes out though, it tends to get our attention (as in the case here).

        We get to as many as we can as promptly as we can.

      • http://www.silentrocco.com SIlent Rocco

        Previews aren't that helpful for a dev, since news from today are forgotten tomorrow. The App Store world is a very fast one.

    • arn

      If you think a game should be reviewed, email the tips address. Posting comments in other game reviews is considered spam, and is ignored (for the purposes of review)

      arn

  • Dennis

    The game looks good. I strongly agree with Karma. I'd like to see universal apps then two seperate ones. Or if theyh have to be seperate from one another, some way to buy both of them at a discounted rate.

  • Dennis

    The game looks good. I strongly agree with Karma. I'd like to see universal apps then two seperate ones. Or if theyh have to be seperate from one another, some way to buy both of them at a discounted rate.

  • Adam

    I have mixed feelings about universal apps. It really depends on file size for me. If an app is 5megs on iphone and would be 15megs universal I would buy the universal app. If an app is 100megs iphone and 300megs universal I would prefer a separate iphone and ipad app.

    This app is 29megs for the iphone and 69megs for ipad. Since the textures are bigger for the ipad app the universal would probably be 80megs or so. For someone with an 8 gig iphone file size matters. They would more than likely prefer to get the iphone only version.

    The ideal solution is the option to do both. Let the users decide. Universal app would cost more than the individual iphone and ipad apps.

    Example for this game:
    iphone: $2.99
    ipad: $4.99
    universal: $5.99

    As good as this game looks though I have a ton of other great games to play so I personally would not pick it up at the above prices.

    Not being universal does affect my buying decisions for games if I am not sure where I would play it more(iphone or ipad) and I am on the fence deciding if I want to buy it or not. I rarely buy 2 different versions of an app so I wouldn't want to buy the wrong version. Pixel doubling the iphone version just isn't good enough to me for most games. If an app is universal I am much more likely to purchase it if I am interested in it.

    • TellTale

      I lke this plan.

      It's a very good idea and develoeprs will get a lot more sales from people who want a universal game and people who are just unsure about different versions to get, plus it's $1 more for their sales. Makes both sides happy. I thick developers should have adopted this plan from the beginning.

    • MrMuesli

      Fully agree with this Adam. So logical. Makes sense both financially for the developer and emotionally for the customer, and thus both parties are happy bunnies on the beach: )

    • Dave

      Any reason why they can't have upgrade pricing? You buy the iphone version and then get an ipad. Update to HD for 50% more...

    • http://www.taptoplay.de Lakeshore | taptoplay.de

      Universal apps only work, when they use something like Plus+ to save the game state online, so that you can switch between the different devices and play where you left off on the other device.

      Or do you really want to play the game on the iPhone and the iPod two times? ;)

      • Maroonfree

        It seems to make most sense to keep both files separate and somehow give the iPad customers a free download of the smaller version.

  • Adam

    I have mixed feelings about universal apps. It really depends on file size for me. If an app is 5megs on iphone and would be 15megs universal I would buy the universal app. If an app is 100megs iphone and 300megs universal I would prefer a separate iphone and ipad app.

    This app is 29megs for the iphone and 69megs for ipad. Since the textures are bigger for the ipad app the universal would probably be 80megs or so. For someone with an 8 gig iphone file size matters. They would more than likely prefer to get the iphone only version.

    The ideal solution is the option to do both. Let the users decide. Universal app would cost more than the individual iphone and ipad apps.

    Example for this game:
    iphone: $2.99
    ipad: $4.99
    universal: $5.99

    As good as this game looks though I have a ton of other great games to play so I personally would not pick it up at the above prices.

    Not being universal does affect my buying decisions for games if I am not sure where I would play it more(iphone or ipad) and I am on the fence deciding if I want to buy it or not. I rarely buy 2 different versions of an app so I wouldn't want to buy the wrong version. Pixel doubling the iphone version just isn't good enough to me for most games. If an app is universal I am much more likely to purchase it if I am interested in it.

    • TellTale

      I lke this plan.

      It's a very good idea and develoeprs will get a lot more sales from people who want a universal game and people who are just unsure about different versions to get, plus it's $1 more for their sales. Makes both sides happy. I thick developers should have adopted this plan from the beginning.

    • MrMuesli

      Fully agree with this Adam. So logical. Makes sense both financially for the developer and emotionally for the customer, and thus both parties are happy bunnies on the beach: )

    • Dave

      Any reason why they can't have upgrade pricing? You buy the iphone version and then get an ipad. Update to HD for 50% more...

    • http://www.taptoplay.de Lakeshore | taptoplay.de

      Universal apps only work, when they use something like Plus+ to save the game state online, so that you can switch between the different devices and play where you left off on the other device.

      Or do you really want to play the game on the iPhone and the iPod two times? ;)

      • Maroonfree

        It seems to make most sense to keep both files separate and somehow give the iPad customers a free download of the smaller version.

  • Bosconian

    OK, don't hate me for this...

    But I think this game might be better on the PSP and/or DS. The long levels and demanding gameplay would be better suited to having physical controls. I'm not a fan of platformers using touch dpads.

    • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

      I think it would make a nice PSP or DS game, too. But it still makes for a great iPhone game.

    • http://www.silentrocco.com SIlent Rocco

      I think, even in 5 years, there will be people brining this "argument".
      Even, if all the other devices will be controlled via touch screen :)

  • Bosconian

    OK, don't hate me for this...

    But I think this game might be better on the PSP and/or DS. The long levels and demanding gameplay would be better suited to having physical controls. I'm not a fan of platformers using touch dpads.

    • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

      I think it would make a nice PSP or DS game, too. But it still makes for a great iPhone game.

    • http://www.silentrocco.com SIlent Rocco

      I think, even in 5 years, there will be people brining this "argument".
      Even, if all the other devices will be controlled via touch screen :)

  • ArtCoder

    I think it'd be nice if apps were universal, but customers shouldn't be demanding them to be so, IMO.

    1 - For most games, making the HD version is not just a question of resizing the assets in Photoshop. The HD version takes work, a lot of work, and if developers can't charge extra for the HD version they might as well not make it.

    2 - Also, games and apps tend not to be universal in most platforms. If you buy Splinter Cell for your XBOX, you don't expect to get the PC version for free. Same thing here. These are two different platforms and that you own both and want to play the same game on both doesn't change that fact.

    3 - Most people demanding universal apps tend to think there's a lot of people who have and iPad *and* an iPhone/iPod, when really very few people have an iPad. Those who only have an iPhone/iPod shouldn't have to carry the burden of the extra content they're not interested in.

    Buying the game for one platform shouldn't entitle you to get it for free on the other (it'd be nice, but it's not feasible for developers, especially indies). So, you should pick the iPhone version if you want to play on both (and be thankful that's possible!) or get the iPad version if you want the HD content.

    (On the other hand, I must say I don't support charging $5 for the same game you can get for $1 on the iPhone. If you think it's worth $1 on the iPhone, the iPad version should be about the same price or only slightly higher).

    • http://scottcolbert.com Scott

      Agreed with all you say. Another way to look at it: if you buy a hardcover book, it doesn't entitle you to the paperback, e-book or audio book for free either.

    • TellTale

      To be fair, you underestimate the critical mass. There are much more than a few people who have both an iPad and iPhone/iPod Touch. A lot of people who bought the iPad were already big fans of the other devices and got the new device. Everyone I know who has an iPad or is getting one soon also has either an iPhone or an iPod Touch, and in the future there will be much more people out there with devices.

      You can try to compare the iPad and iphone to home consoles all you want, but its a different situation with these devices, they both use the same operating system and are fairly apart of the same set of devices and making the game run equally enhanced on both devices isn't a huge chore as it would be on the xbox to xbox 360...what would take a year to years on those systems, only takes a couple of weeks on the iPad and iPhone, and then someone, maybe the developer, comes to a topic and tries to say it's the same.

      Anyways, there are more than you think who have both the iPad and iPhone, and think about it, threes going to be a hell of a lot more in the future with people who own both so it would definitely be beneficial to at least have a universal version and charge at least $1 more, this way you get a lot more sales from people who have both systems, if not now, then definitely in the future. I would have bought Babylonian Twins if there were a universal version, as it stands it's something I too have to think about, and maybe in that time I would end up losing interest.

      • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

        iPhone + iPod Touch installed base: 80+ million
        iPad installed base: about a million.

        The great majority of iPhone/iPod Touch users do not own an iPad. To bulk an app with unnecessary resources in order to please a 1/80 minority of the market makes no sense. I do agree that releasing a special dual version for a premium would be smark, but to just do one app (at one price) for both platform is silly.

      • TellTale

        If developers thought like that, then why bother even making an HD version? It's only 1/80 of the users anyways. Even if it is say 1/80 of the users that's still a lot, and the numbers will only grow exponentially with how fast the iPad is selling, and a lot of those multimillions of iPhone/iPod Touch customers will also get an iPad, so to secure those sales for the future it's a great idea to make a separate universal app version at a little higher price. If they sold say 2,000 copies in the beginning with the universal app at $6, that's $12,000 worth of sales...I think that's definitely worth it.

        Yes I agree, very smart for any developer to release a universal version of an app at maybe $1 more, especially those releasing new games on the market with 2 different versions such as this game.

  • ArtCoder

    I think it'd be nice if apps were universal, but customers shouldn't be demanding them to be so, IMO.

    1 - For most games, making the HD version is not just a question of resizing the assets in Photoshop. The HD version takes work, a lot of work, and if developers can't charge extra for the HD version they might as well not make it.

    2 - Also, games and apps tend not to be universal in most platforms. If you buy Splinter Cell for your XBOX, you don't expect to get the PC version for free. Same thing here. These are two different platforms and that you own both and want to play the same game on both doesn't change that fact.

    3 - Most people demanding universal apps tend to think there's a lot of people who have and iPad *and* an iPhone/iPod, when really very few people have an iPad. Those who only have an iPhone/iPod shouldn't have to carry the burden of the extra content they're not interested in.

    Buying the game for one platform shouldn't entitle you to get it for free on the other (it'd be nice, but it's not feasible for developers, especially indies). So, you should pick the iPhone version if you want to play on both (and be thankful that's possible!) or get the iPad version if you want the HD content.

    (On the other hand, I must say I don't support charging $5 for the same game you can get for $1 on the iPhone. If you think it's worth $1 on the iPhone, the iPad version should be about the same price or only slightly higher).

    • http://scottcolbert.com Scott

      Agreed with all you say. Another way to look at it: if you buy a hardcover book, it doesn't entitle you to the paperback, e-book or audio book for free either.

    • TellTale

      To be fair, you underestimate the critical mass. There are much more than a few people who have both an iPad and iPhone/iPod Touch. A lot of people who bought the iPad were already big fans of the other devices and got the new device. Everyone I know who has an iPad or is getting one soon also has either an iPhone or an iPod Touch, and in the future there will be much more people out there with devices.

      You can try to compare the iPad and iphone to home consoles all you want, but its a different situation with these devices, they both use the same operating system and are fairly apart of the same set of devices and making the game run equally enhanced on both devices isn't a huge chore as it would be on the xbox to xbox 360...what would take a year to years on those systems, only takes a couple of weeks on the iPad and iPhone, and then someone, maybe the developer, comes to a topic and tries to say it's the same.

      Anyways, there are more than you think who have both the iPad and iPhone, and think about it, threes going to be a hell of a lot more in the future with people who own both so it would definitely be beneficial to at least have a universal version and charge at least $1 more, this way you get a lot more sales from people who have both systems, if not now, then definitely in the future. I would have bought Babylonian Twins if there were a universal version, as it stands it's something I too have to think about, and maybe in that time I would end up losing interest.

      • http://www.squarezerostudio.com squarezero

        iPhone + iPod Touch installed base: 80+ million
        iPad installed base: about a million.

        The great majority of iPhone/iPod Touch users do not own an iPad. To bulk an app with unnecessary resources in order to please a 1/80 minority of the market makes no sense. I do agree that releasing a special dual version for a premium would be smark, but to just do one app (at one price) for both platform is silly.

      • TellTale

        If developers thought like that, then why bother even making an HD version? It's only 1/80 of the users anyways. Even if it is say 1/80 of the users that's still a lot, and the numbers will only grow exponentially with how fast the iPad is selling, and a lot of those multimillions of iPhone/iPod Touch customers will also get an iPad, so to secure those sales for the future it's a great idea to make a separate universal app version at a little higher price. If they sold say 2,000 copies in the beginning with the universal app at $6, that's $12,000 worth of sales...I think that's definitely worth it.

        Yes I agree, very smart for any developer to release a universal version of an app at maybe $1 more, especially those releasing new games on the market with 2 different versions such as this game.

  • Brandon

    I think it's a great game and the controls are really tight. The only other platformer I played with tight controls like this was soozis.

  • Brandon

    I think it's a great game and the controls are really tight. The only other platformer I played with tight controls like this was soozis.

  • http://manuspielt.wordpress.com Manu

    My prefered way would be an inGame Purchase to be able to "upgrade" my iPhone Apps to Universal and vice versa.

    for example i bought PvsZ and RealRacing for the iPhone - i would really like to buy the HD Versions but as a loyal customer i wish i could have an "upgrade" Option, i would easily pay another buck or two for that, but not 10 or more $ for a game i already own again.

  • http://manuspielt.wordpress.com Manu

    My prefered way would be an inGame Purchase to be able to "upgrade" my iPhone Apps to Universal and vice versa.

    for example i bought PvsZ and RealRacing for the iPhone - i would really like to buy the HD Versions but as a loyal customer i wish i could have an "upgrade" Option, i would easily pay another buck or two for that, but not 10 or more $ for a game i already own again.

  • James

    No universal, no purchase.

  • James

    No universal, no purchase.

  • Brandon

    This is STUPID

    "no universal, no purchase."

    THE IPHONE VERSION IS UNIVERSAL

    :facepalm

  • Brandon

    This is STUPID

    "no universal, no purchase."

    THE IPHONE VERSION IS UNIVERSAL

    :facepalm

  • http://www.blakespot.com Blake Patterson

    An online acquaintance of mine had her picture taken playing Babylonian Twins demo on one of her Amigas.

    http://retrogamer.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=19280&p=474145#p438140

    I thought some might enjoy...

    • Lukeb

      That was cruel. sincerely, thank you, but that was cruel.

      • Lukeb

        BTW- How did you (or she) know that Capcom was about to introduce Cammy as DLC for Street Fighter IV?

    • himanshu

      lol...

      I had never seen amiga. Is that it?

  • http://www.blakespot.com Blake Patterson

    An online acquaintance of mine had her picture taken playing Babylonian Twins demo on one of her Amigas.

    http://retrogamer.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=19280&p=474145#p438140

    I thought some might enjoy...

    • Lukeb

      That was cruel. sincerely, thank you, but that was cruel.

      • Lukeb

        BTW- How did you (or she) know that Capcom was about to introduce Cammy as DLC for Street Fighter IV?

    • himanshu

      lol...

      I had never seen amiga. Is that it?

  • TKO

    I don't get the complaints about no universal version .. the combined price is still less than most games one *any* other platform out there. Checked the prices on NintendoDS, or freaking crazy *PSP*? This is still a good deal.

    And, besides that, the iPhone version is 30MB .. iPad? Freaking 70MB! Why should the majority or players have to have 70MB of space taken up on their Phone/Touch that they're never gonna use? If Apple were to provide a mechanism not to include iPad assets when installing on the iPhone, and vice-versa, then it might be different. (or, as people have mentioned, the possibility of purchasing the iPad components in-game. ..but I can imagine that being a programmers nightmare to implement.)

    Personally I think they've done us a favor by splitting the versions.

  • TKO

    I don't get the complaints about no universal version .. the combined price is still less than most games one *any* other platform out there. Checked the prices on NintendoDS, or freaking crazy *PSP*? This is still a good deal.

    And, besides that, the iPhone version is 30MB .. iPad? Freaking 70MB! Why should the majority or players have to have 70MB of space taken up on their Phone/Touch that they're never gonna use? If Apple were to provide a mechanism not to include iPad assets when installing on the iPhone, and vice-versa, then it might be different. (or, as people have mentioned, the possibility of purchasing the iPad components in-game. ..but I can imagine that being a programmers nightmare to implement.)

    Personally I think they've done us a favor by splitting the versions.

  • Rissa

    I need help to get past The Prison Level

  • Rissa

    I need help to get past The Prison Level