Finnish developer Secret Exit has just released SPiN Lite [App Store], a free version of their 3D puzzle matching game SPiN [$4.99, App Store], that features only the 60-second Minute Rush challenge mode from the original.

SPiN is a shape matching puzzle game that makes good use of the iPhone’s multi-touch interface to spin 3D objects around in order to match it up with the silhouette shown.  3D rotation is accomplished using left/right and two-finger rotation gestures.

SPiN Lite features as listed by Secret Exit:

  • Multi-touch rotation controls
  • 10 difficulty levels with 100 stages
  • 11th difficulty level for the insane
  • Unlockable trophy objects
  • 4 different game modes
  • Chain Combos and Bonus Multipliers!
  • 100 different 3D objects
  • Streaks, stars and flashy stuff!
  • Unique and stylized visual design

The original SPiN is the winner of the IGN Editors' Choice award, the GDC Most Innovative Mobile Game award, and the Forum Nokia Pro Best Mobile Game award.  And with good reason.  We found SPiN to be a highly innovative title that's very well suited to the iPhone and worthy of more attention than it's getting in the App Store.

App Store Link: SPiN Lite, Free

  • http://www.metroccolis.com your personal robot

    Cool, finally I got the chance to try this concept
    and I realized, that this is totally nothing for me :)
    Lite versions are fantastic!

  • http://www.metroccolis.com your personal robot

    Cool, finally I got the chance to try this concept
    and I realized, that this is totally nothing for me :)
    Lite versions are fantastic!

  • http://www.secretexit.com Frand

    The price of the full version is actually $4.99 again.

  • http://www.secretexit.com Frand

    The price of the full version is actually $4.99 again.

  • dave

    Love spin!

  • dave

    Love spin!

  • http://www.visionaryart.biz nanokiwi

    quite a good game but from the creator's relentless self-promotion on the forum i expected it to make toast (or something)

  • http://www.visionaryart.biz nanokiwi

    quite a good game but from the creator's relentless self-promotion on the forum i expected it to make toast (or something)

  • http://www.secretexit.com Frand

    Relentless? :)

    Games are a serious thing when your livelihood depends on them. But not so serious that I wouldn't use pom-poms.

  • http://www.secretexit.com Frand

    Relentless? :)

    Games are a serious thing when your livelihood depends on them. But not so serious that I wouldn't use pom-poms.

  • Fat Phil

    Pom-Poms...hmmm..... and handcuffs? :)

    Ok new direction... this is a great game. I hate seeing crap in the charts when so much good stuff sits in the nether-regions. Everyone without an invisible game out there REALLY underestimate how bad sales numbers are (hold up one hand and count your fingers) for good games that just can't get a foothold.

    Let me put it this way: It's less than the minimum wage for a day's work at Burger King.

    And considering even the more expensive good games are still cheaper than a whopper with cheese (and they won't kill you slowly), it drives me nuts to see people complain about price.

    Props to anyone with the energy and enthusiasm to keep promoting a good app. So Frand...back to the pom-poms....? ;)

  • Fat Phil

    Pom-Poms...hmmm..... and handcuffs? :)

    Ok new direction... this is a great game. I hate seeing crap in the charts when so much good stuff sits in the nether-regions. Everyone without an invisible game out there REALLY underestimate how bad sales numbers are (hold up one hand and count your fingers) for good games that just can't get a foothold.

    Let me put it this way: It's less than the minimum wage for a day's work at Burger King.

    And considering even the more expensive good games are still cheaper than a whopper with cheese (and they won't kill you slowly), it drives me nuts to see people complain about price.

    Props to anyone with the energy and enthusiasm to keep promoting a good app. So Frand...back to the pom-poms....? ;)

  • http://www.twiddlegeek.com Tony

    "Let me put it this way: It’s less than the minimum wage for a day’s work at Burger King."

    This is always an interesting concept to me though... the idea of developers making X amount of money off their games and comparing that to a would-be hourly wage. It almost feels as though a lot of folks (not saying this one at all, just in general) feel as though a game deserves to make $Y dollars, regardless of if there's a market for it or not.

    The guy making minimum wage at Burger King is putting in constant work for his hourly wage. I realize games take many hours of development, but it's apples to oranges. I can't begin to estimate how many hours of work I've put into my website over the years, but I've never tried to monetize it. I put the time into it of my own free will. On the other hand, the experience gained over the years helped me to land a job as a web developer.

    The app store has a glut of sub-par games, and even the really great games aren't all going to sell if there's just not enough demand to support all of them. I really dislike the stories about Trism's dev making X amount of money in 2 weeks, then claiming any kid in their bedroom could do the same. It's a creating false ideas about how the market works.

    While I don't begrudge anyone trying to sale a game, and I've bought a few myself, my hat is always off to the people who put the time in as a labor of love.

  • http://www.twiddlegeek.com Tony

    "Let me put it this way: It’s less than the minimum wage for a day’s work at Burger King."

    This is always an interesting concept to me though... the idea of developers making X amount of money off their games and comparing that to a would-be hourly wage. It almost feels as though a lot of folks (not saying this one at all, just in general) feel as though a game deserves to make $Y dollars, regardless of if there's a market for it or not.

    The guy making minimum wage at Burger King is putting in constant work for his hourly wage. I realize games take many hours of development, but it's apples to oranges. I can't begin to estimate how many hours of work I've put into my website over the years, but I've never tried to monetize it. I put the time into it of my own free will. On the other hand, the experience gained over the years helped me to land a job as a web developer.

    The app store has a glut of sub-par games, and even the really great games aren't all going to sell if there's just not enough demand to support all of them. I really dislike the stories about Trism's dev making X amount of money in 2 weeks, then claiming any kid in their bedroom could do the same. It's a creating false ideas about how the market works.

    While I don't begrudge anyone trying to sale a game, and I've bought a few myself, my hat is always off to the people who put the time in as a labor of love.

  • Fat Phil

    @Tony

    You can always tell if a game is a labor of love, because it will almost be good - even if it looks like tripe, or sounds like trip, it will be good at it's heart.

    Which has absolutely nothing to do with feeding children and paying bills. Do you know many burger king employees who work seven days a week, sleep four hours a night, for months on end?

    Why would anyone do that??

    Simple. Because nobody wants to pay the "appropriate price" for games, so we can't afford to pay the staff, which means we end up doing twice as much work ourselves. Well, it looks like a bubble and it sounds like a bubble... wonder how long till it bursts...

    Nothing's free in the supermarket, so how did we become so self-righteous online?

  • Fat Phil

    @Tony

    You can always tell if a game is a labor of love, because it will almost be good - even if it looks like tripe, or sounds like trip, it will be good at it's heart.

    Which has absolutely nothing to do with feeding children and paying bills. Do you know many burger king employees who work seven days a week, sleep four hours a night, for months on end?

    Why would anyone do that??

    Simple. Because nobody wants to pay the "appropriate price" for games, so we can't afford to pay the staff, which means we end up doing twice as much work ourselves. Well, it looks like a bubble and it sounds like a bubble... wonder how long till it bursts...

    Nothing's free in the supermarket, so how did we become so self-righteous online?