As readers will recall, one of the first games demonstrated on the iPhone was SEGA's port of Super Monkey Ball.  It, like EA's Spore, was ported in just two weeks time by a team that had no previous experience with the iPhone or Apple's Mac OS X platform.

Recently, SEGA producer Ethan Einhorn was interviewed by GameCyte regarding the Super Monkey Ball port and had many promising and positive things to say about Apple's mobile gaming platform.

...it's also the hardware concerns of what is the button confguration like on all of these different devices.  It's uniform on the iPhone and the iPod touch.  It's one device that you know that you're programming for, that you know it will work.  No software compatibility concerns.  And that's very exciting.  You combine that with a level of power that is definitely competitive with dedicated handheld gaming machines and you have, potentially, a revolution on your hands in handheld gaming.

While the Super Monkey Ball franchise played well on the its launch platform, the Nintendo Game Cube, it was only when it landed on the Wii, with its accelerometer-laden Wii-mote, that it became a perfect gaming experience.  Players should expect nothing less from the iPhone port of this very enjoyable title.

  • Me

    Last time I checked, the iPhone didn't have an accelerometer, so your comment that "Players should expect nothing less" is pretty idiotic.

  • Me

    Last time I checked, the iPhone didn't have an accelerometer, so your comment that "Players should expect nothing less" is pretty idiotic.

  • blakespot

    One of the iPhone's most prominent features, its ability to properly orient the screen display depending on how the user is holding it, is driven by the its accelerometer. Have a look:

    http://www.apple.com/iphone/features/index.html#accelerometer

    As well, at exactly 1hr into Apple's Quicktime stream of the iPhone SDK rollout event, Super Monkey Ball, controlled by tilting the iPhone (thanks to its acceletometer), is rather clearly demonstrated and discussed. Have a look:

    http://www.apple.com/quicktime/qtv/iphoneroadmap/

  • blakespot

    One of the iPhone's most prominent features, its ability to properly orient the screen display depending on how the user is holding it, is driven by the its accelerometer. Have a look:

    http://www.apple.com/iphone/features/index.html#accelerometer

    As well, at exactly 1hr into Apple's Quicktime stream of the iPhone SDK rollout event, Super Monkey Ball, controlled by tilting the iPhone (thanks to its acceletometer), is rather clearly demonstrated and discussed. Have a look:

    http://www.apple.com/quicktime/qtv/iphoneroadmap/

  • Response to Idiot Above

    You really need to do some research before you post idiotic comments. The iPhone has 3 accelerometers... how do you think it knows when to switch from portrait to landscape mode. This is obviously coming from someone who doesn't have an iPhone and has never used one. I really wish people would at least comment on products they have used.

  • Response to Idiot Above

    You really need to do some research before you post idiotic comments. The iPhone has 3 accelerometers... how do you think it knows when to switch from portrait to landscape mode. This is obviously coming from someone who doesn't have an iPhone and has never used one. I really wish people would at least comment on products they have used.

  • Wow

    Haha, clearly the "last time you checked" was prior to the announcement of the iPhone.

  • Wow

    Haha, clearly the "last time you checked" was prior to the announcement of the iPhone.

  • steven

    wow first poster... way to be a d-bag... you think the associate producer would know how the game controls...

    SEGA is doing great things by innovating with the iPhone as a whole, not just using its rather heady processing power. Nice.

  • steven

    wow first poster... way to be a d-bag... you think the associate producer would know how the game controls...

    SEGA is doing great things by innovating with the iPhone as a whole, not just using its rather heady processing power. Nice.