Category Archives: Adventure

'Out There: Ω Edition' Launches on PC and Mac, but the Free iOS Upgrade Should Follow Soon

Last week, Mi-Clos Studio released Out There: Ω Edition, a graphical overhaul of last year's excellent iOS space-faring adventure game, on Steam for Windows, OS X, and Linux. The Ω will come as a free upgrade for Android and iOS players who purchased the original, but we haven't heard much about it since last year...

'Criminel' for iPad Review - A Flawed Investigation

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April 2nd, 2015 7:54 PM EDT by Carter Dotson in $1.99, 3 stars, Adventure, Games, iPad Games, Reviews
$1.99 Buy Now

I feel like Criminel [$1.99] is a game that could have been great, but it never manages to deliver on its promise, relying entirely on story and theme without challenging the player. The premise is that you're a new crime scene photographer in Paris in 1890, and you join the police force to help solve crimes with the investigator you work under, Max Roget. You learn the basics – you take photos of relevant evidence, examine the photos for any important aspects, then analyze witness testimony in order to find the important clues to figure out who committed the crime. Then, you get a lineup of criminals based on the collected details, and you have to accuse the person who likely did it...




Generally speaking, I am very reluctant to get into the discussion of what is or isn't a game. Any such talk typically requires a great deal of presumption on the part of the person drawing invisible lines in the sand. Being a big fan of gamebooks, text adventures, experience games, and so on, it's a conversation that all too often ends with some titles I greatly enjoy being branded 'non-games'. Then people start getting cranky, someone asks what the definition of an RPG is anyway, another person throws off their gloves and helmet, and the whole party is ruined. No, I'm not going to do that...

'Forgotten Memories: Alternate Realities' Preview: As Creepy As You Want It To Be

If anticipation for a game can be measured by the conversation it generates, then over six thousand comments in a Touch Arcade forum thread would suggest that Canadian developers Psychoz Interactive have got a sure-fire hit on their hands with Forgotten Memories. We got our hands on an advance copy of the survival horror game, and chatted with the game's director Georges Paz...

'Tales from the Borderlands' Review - Less Loot, More Talk

The idea of Tales from the Borderlands [$4.99] was certainly an intriguing one once it was announced. The Borderlands series definitely has a unique feel to it from its setting, dialogue, and characters that can be easily screwed up by a developer not quite in tune with the way the series operates. The good news is that Telltale Games are experts at story, so the idea that they could approach and do justice to this universe while also expanding on it in a way that isn't just a loot-filled first-person shooter is an interesting proposition...

'Ryan North's To Be Or Not To Be' Review - All Aboard the Party Boat to England

You probably know the William Shakespeare play Hamlet, or at least you have some form of cultural awareness about it thanks to English classes. You at least know the famous opening line to the character Hamlet's soliloquy, which provides the title of the latest gamebook adaptation from Tin Man Games, To Be Or Not To Be [$5.99]. This is adapted from Ryan North's choose-your-own-adventure novel of the same name from 2013, now available in handy digital form! I'm a fan of Ryan North's work, being a fan of the fantastic long-running webcomic Dinosaur Comics and of his spectacular run on the Adventure Time comic series. He has this particular sense of absurd humor that comes through in everything he makes, he has this distinctive voice, so as soon as I heard that To Be Or Not To Be was a thing that existed, based on a 2013 book of the same name, I couldn't wait to get my hands on it. And it was well worth the wait, as this is an absolutely hilarious adventure...

As a dungeon crawler with a bunch of freemium systems meshed into its core, Dungeon Hunter 5 [Free]can be a tough game to crack. It’s not just a matter of figuring out how to cope with the game’s plethora of timers and premium currency — it takes some advanced knowledge of the game’s freemium elements in order to work within them and potentially take advantage of them. The purpose of this guide is to impart some of that knowledge needed to succeed, as well as offer a few tips that can hopefully help you succeed...

Gameloft’s Dungeon Hunter dungeon crawler series has seen a lot of changes over the years, and that theme continues with this year’s release of Dungeon Hunter 5 [Free]. Yes, the hack n’ slash series continues its march into freemium territory, but this time it does so with a system that’s pretty fair to its players. It actually leads to a game that’s not only pretty enjoyable (within the confines of its systems) but has the potential for long term investment...

Ever since we first caught wind of it back in February, Sick Bricks  [Free] by Spin Master has been an intriguing title to play. A lot of the individual elements have been seen before in countless games before it. However, as a compilation, we’ve never quite seen a title combine all of those elements with a real-world toy buying campaign. Granted, it’s not quite the perfect melding of real and digital world assets that I’d like. However, Sick Bricks is still a pretty fun game and should do quite well with its intended audience...

A Closer Look at Character Beaming in the Upcoming 'Sick Bricks'

Earlier this month, we took a look at Spin Master’s Sick Bricks, a new action-adventure title with a ton of characters available to unlock. One of the coolest aspects of the game is its accompanying suite of actual physical toys that can be purchased at brick and mortar stores which can be “beamed” into the game, unlocking the character in the game. We thought we’d take a closer look at the toys themselves and how they interact with the game as we wait for its launch...

Hands-on with 'Sick Bricks' - A Mobile-First Toy Adventure

iOS was a little late to the game when it came to action-adventure games that featured real-world toys. Disney’s iOS version of Infinity [Free] is restricted to its (admittedly cool) toy box mode while Skylander’s Trap Team [Free (HD)] is the first title on iOS to offer the full console package. While both have enjoyed some success on iOS, they are still ports of console juggernauts. Sick Bricks by toymaker Spin Master looks to change all that with a new universe of animated shorts and miniature toys all grounded in an action-adventure title designed for mobile...

Evoland [$4.99] is an odd experience. It's packed to the brim with genuine enthusiasm for my favorite genre and many great games of that genre and outside of it. Like an experienced stage magician running through his act, it has a brilliant set of tricks that it cleverly lays out one after the other, upping the ante each time to maintain your awe and excitement. At first they come at breakneck speed, not unlike the progress of gaming technology itself. After a half hour or so of this, the designers must have realized that they had to space out their remaining cards so that the game wouldn't be finished too quickly. Things slow down. They ride out the previous trick for a while, perhaps too long. Then, having exhausted their bag of tricks and understanding that even a patient audience can get restless, things come to a swift, sweet finish. Evoland is too short at times and too long at others...

'Fahrenheit: Indigo Prophecy Remastered' Review - My Kind of Nightmare

Celebrating its tenth anniversary, Quantic Dream’s Indigo Prophecy was recently rereleased on PC. Luckily, the developers also saw fit to port it over to iOS under the full title Fahrenheit: Indigo Prophecy Remastered [$9.99] as part of its decennial celebration. As a narrative-heavy action-adventure, Indigo Prophecy was excellent for its time and mostly makes a successful transition to Apple’s portable devices...

It was just about a year ago that Mi-Clos Studio launched their haunting deep-space survival game Out There [$1.99] to critical praise, including our own 5 star review and Game of the Week nod. In July of last year the studio announced that Out There would be getting a huge revamp dubbed the "Omega Edition" and along with that it would be expanding to PC, Mac and Linux. Just last month, Mi-Clos revealed the first images of Omega Edition and detailed some of the changes and new features that it would include. Today the beta version of Out There: Omega Edition has launched and Mi-Clos has released the first trailer showing off some of the new features in the game, including the slick new graphical engine...

Tin Man Games has been applying their considerable gamebook know-how to the Fighting Fantasy series for a couple of years now, so far releasing eight of the most popular and noteworthy installments of the franchise. While there are a couple of conspicuous absences remaining, the developer has shown a good eye in its selections thus far. The latest release, Fighting Fantasy: Bloodbones [$5.99], is an interesting choice for a few reasons. This is the first of Tin Man's Fighting Fantasy releases that isn't written by either Ian Livingstone or Steve Jackson, instead being the work of Jonathan Green, one of the writers from the later days of the series. Bloodbones was considered a lost book for several years, as it was initially planned as the 60th entry in the series before publisher Puffin canceled Fighting Fantasy with the 59th book. Like its titular character, death didn't hold it back for long. In 2006, fans could finally put their hands on Bloodbones as the 26th release in the Wizard Books revival of the line...

Now, here's a rare situation. One of the strengths of the gamebook genre is in the sheer variety of situations it covers. Unlike most RPGs, there aren't a lot of expensive assets that need to be built and hopefully reused in future games, since apart from a handful of still pictures, the world is built through text. This frees the writers to tackle any kind of story or setting they want, including superheroes, pirates, horror, fantasy, comedy, and so on. With virtually anything on the table in terms of possibilities, the one type of story we don't see terribly often in gamebooks is a sequel story. Sure, the Fighting Fantasy series had a couple of direct sequels along with some tenuous links between their fantasy stories, most notably in the Sorcery! sub-series, and even the classic Choose Your Own Adventure series had a couple of follow-up books to some of the most popular stories. The Lone Wolf series was notable for allowing you carry your character forward from book to book, though the stories necessarily had to be stand-alone to a great extent...

One of the great things about the mobile platform is it's a perfect place to experiment with new ideas. Simogo is the first name that comes to mind when I think about who is pushing the boundaries of interactive storytelling using the strength of mobile devices. Today, a new game is making waves for its similarly unique way of telling a story, and that game is Mayday! Deep Space [$2.99] by Daniel Wilson, renowned author of tons of robot-themed literature including the New York Times bestseller Robopocalypse...

Anh Huy Phan has brought one of my favorite genres to iOS. Star Nomad Elite[$3.99] is a trimmed down, stream lined 2d space adventure game. The game notes have a shout out to Elite, Wing Commander, Privateer, Escape Velocity and Freelancer. I was a bit surprised that my favorite 2d space sim, Star Sonata wasn't also mentioned. In any case, I had a lot of expectations going into Star Nomad. It's a fun game from a very small indie outfit that could really take you by surprise. ..

I don't think a person needed to be a fortune-teller to see this outcome, but going back to my review of Tomb Raider 1 [$0.99] from last year, I ended it by expressing little hope for a potential port of Tomb Raider 2 [$1.99] fixing the control issues with the first game. It wasn't hard to guess because the problem is neither with the unorthodox and somewhat fussy controls of the Tomb Raider series, nor was it with virtual controls, but rather the marriage of the two that the mobile version offered. There's simply no clear way to map virtual controls to these games in a satisfying way. Tomb Raider 2 only makes that problem clearer with its increased challenge and greater emphasis on pulling off non-stop sequences of moves, particularly in timed situations. It's the kind of situation where I don't feel good about giving it a score, because if you have an MFi controller, this game is an incredible experience at a ridiculously low price, but if you don't, it's just about pointless to buy. Consider the number at the end of this review to be the middle of those two scenarios and apply it to your own situation accordingly...

Regardless of how you might feel about Seabeard’s [Free] freemium tendencies, it’s an incredibly deep game with a lot of content behind it. Unfortunately, a lot of that content requires understanding the intricacies of its timer systems and how it trains players to play the game. The following compiles a few tips and tricks on how to succeed within Seabeard’s system. We talk a little bit about quests before discussing the game’s inventory system, sailing minigames, and even some tips on spending the hard-to-earn pearls...

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