Category Archives: Accessories

The long-awaited Pokemon GO [Free] accessory that helps you catch Pokemon while out and about is finally available: you can now buy the Pokemon GO Plus. Do note that finding it might be a bit tough – Amazon and GameStop are the primary retailers, but are both sold out online. I'd call around town to various GameStops if you need it today. Otherwise, you might have to wait until the hype dies down a bit to nab one for yourself...

Pokemon GO Plus, the wrist-worn device that connects to your mobile phone via Bluetooth and allows you to play Pokemon GO [Free], finally has a release date: Next Friday, September 16th. You may recall that the Plus was originally announced to launch before the end of July, but was delayed until sometime in September. Well, now we know when that sometime is! The device will set you back about $35 and will be compatible with iPhone 5 devices and above running at least iOS 8. It'll also be compatibile with Android devices equipped with 2GB of RAM and running Android version 4.4-6.0, as well as Bluetooth 4.0 which allows for low-power consumption. ..




Lost in all the hysteria over the potential for virtual reality is the Samsung Gear VR. The Gear VR might be the most mature virtual reality solution yet, not only because the hardware is made in partnership with Oculus, but because the third revision of the Gear VR is set to hit. With the new Galaxy Note 7 announced at Galaxy Unpacked 2016, the Gear VR's latest revision was part of the festivities, bringing some improvements and one feature that could prove useful to the device's future...

If you want an iOS MFi controller that holds your device and isn't just a Bluetooth controller, then good news: it just became easier to get your hands on the Gamevice. Starting today, you can pick up the Gamevice at Apple Stores around the world, for $99.95 each. Now, that is expensive in comparison to other controllers – the SteelSeries Nimbus goes for $49.99 after all, and my personal favorite the Mad Catz CTRLi can be found for the same price (and it features an iPhone clip). But the advantage is of course getting a wired connection, and there's definitely a benefit to having the system held in place at a comfortable angle...

I'm kind of picky with audio quality – not too much, but a bit more than many folks. Where most of our Mobcrush streamers use basic setups for their streaming from iPad, I go crazy using an audio mixer and good headphones with microphones. For a while I was using the Yamaha AG03 mixer on loan for review, but after returning it, I picked up a Behringer Xenyx302 that does a good enough job though I want to pick up the AG06 at some point. For my headphones, I was using the V-Moda M-100 with the BoomPro detachable boom microphone. But an issue I was having was that the headphones were isolating myself from my own voice too much. Combined with the always-on voice monitoring on the Xenyx302, this meant other people in my house could hear me talking because I'm probably yelling. I have open-back headphones that would isolate less, but I didn't have the boom microphone setup that I prefer for streaming, particularly when I'm streaming from an iPad that can move about. A desktop mic in this situation might not be preferable, and a complicated microphone setup seems excessive for streaming games straight from an iPad. Thankfully, an opportunity to review the ModMic 4.0 came around, and I jumped on it to see just how well this commonly-recommended solution works for headphones...

The problem with gaming headsets is that you're often trading quality for convenience. And the expensive gaming headsets don't often mean that you're getting a better product if you care about sound quality. Many premium brands focus on style and branding and the sound quality suffers. If you want to drop some serious coin on a gaming headset, don't. Buy a good set of headphones, preferably open-back ones, and add your own mic. But there is a line where the cost of adding a mic to a set of headphones is prohibitive. Right now, the HyperX Clous sits on that line. Audiophile communities name these as one of the few gaming headsets they recommend. So, after a PAX South meeting with HyperX, I took the Cloud II for a spin...

Blue Lola Headphones Review: Good Microphone Maker Also Good at Headphones

Blue Microphones has been most known for their, well, microphones. It's not uncommon to see someone at least somewhat dedicated to higher-quality microphones than built-in setups to be rocking the Blue Snowball or Yeti. Blue has started getting into headphones as well, and their second pair, Lola, is a fantastic entry into the market. The Lola is a bit bulky, but it offers fantastic, balanced sound for the price...

Kingston's HyperX brand has largely been known for gamer-targeted, performance-focused computer components, but HyperX has started jumping into the gaming headset buiness recently, and with smashing results. The HyperX Cloud and Cloud II, priced at $79.99 and $99.99, are among the few well-regarded gaming headsets in the audiophile community in their price range. The headsets have good noise isolation, good sound for gaming, are remarkably comfortable, boast durable metal construction, and have detachable microphones. The Cloud II differs from the Cloud I in that it comes with a memory foam headband, and a 7.1 USB DAC for virtual surround sound. As well, the Cloud Core for $59.99 at Gamestop cuts out some of the optional acessories such as the travel pouch and optional earpads. ..

The world of MFi controllers is still struggling to find its way more than two years after being introduced to iOS. There are quite a few controller options available nowadays, some quite good, some that are pretty terrible, and none that are absolute stand-out, must-own devices. However, one of the better MFi solutions to come along is the Gamevice from Wikipad. ..

With mobile gaming poised to play a more serious role down the road in gaming culture as a whole, I'd expect video – both YouTubers and streamers – to play a bigger role. And while you could just use whatever headset you want, what if you want to do some more complicated audio things? What if you wanted to bring in remote people to your videos, or play outside sounds easily? Or would you rather adjust your volume precisely on the fly with a hardware switch, instead of software solutions? Or what if you had high-end audio equipment you'd love to use on your iOS? Yamaha has introduced a pair of audio mixing consoles – the AG03 and AG06, designed for consumers and gamers, featuring easy support for 3.5mm audio headsets, digital support for iOS devices, and more, all at a reasonable price for a quality audio mixer: $149.99 street price for the AG03, and $199 for the AG06...

I feel like mobile technology needs some kind of universal constant we can cite, something along the lines of Rule 34, that says "A case exists for every conceivable piece of portable electronics." We saw it with ridiculous cases for the Apple Watch, and history is once again repeating itself with the Apple TV remote. Griffin is the first of what I'm sure will be many different accessory manufacturers making cases for the remote, with the silicon Survivor Play for Siri Remote. ..

The Crissaegrim NES30 Pro isn't 8bitdo Tech's first portable iOS gamepad, but it's certainly the flashiest. Normally, I'd be skeptical that the NES30 Pro actually exists—the internet is littered with vaporware accessories gussied-up to look like old Nintendo products—but the Hong Kong-based company has other gamepads at a reasonable price on honest-to-goodness retailers, so I'll play along...

In case your nostalgia for the 1990's, video games, and 1990's video games hasn't been sufficiently commodified, peripheral manufacturer Hyperkin has today's Internet curio: the so-called Smart Boy, an add-on that turns your iPhone 6 into, well, a Nintendo Game Boy...

When I received the Turtle Beach Ear Force i30 Headphones for review, my hope was that they could solve the problem that exists with cheaper Bluetooth headsets that I've used: audio latency that makes them unpleasant to use with games. If anyone could sort it out, why not Turtle Beach, with a $300 headset made specifically for iOS? They are well-known for their gaming headsets, and I have a wired headset that I bought a few years ago that works well for what I need when I need it...

At about this time last year, Wikipad announced a new controller solution for mobile device gamers called the Gamevice. It featured a cradle design where your device attached between two controller parts and originally was intended for Windows 8 and Android tablets, with an iOS version being something Wikipad hoped to provide in the future. Then in June of last year, Wikipad unveiled a redesigned Gamevice, this time solely targeting compatibility with Apple's iPad. Well it looks like the Gamevice has undergone another slight redesign and is finally going to be available this March, as noted by Polygon. ..

MOGA Rebel MFi Controller Review - Easily the Best Full-Size iOS Controller Currently Available

It's been about a year that we've been living in a world of MFi controllers, but for a variety of reasons official controller support on iOS hasn't been the massive hit everyone expected it to be. While a few decent controllers have been released, none of them have been perfect or particularly "must have", and they all feel expensive compared to controllers on other gaming platforms...

Hands-On Video and Impressions of the MOGA Rebel MFi Controller

Yesterday, MOGA officially unveiled their first full-sized MFi controller for iOS devices, the MOGA Rebel. I had a chance to sit down with the final version of the hardware with company representatives in San Francisco and spend a little time trying it out. I'll be saving most of my thoughts for a full review in time for the controller's release next Wednesday, after spending the weekend really putting it through its paces, but for now here are some initial thoughts and a little hands-on video to give you a better idea of what the MOGA Rebel offers those looking for a decent full-size MFi controller...

Mad Catz C.T.R.L.i Bluetooth iOS 7 Controller Revealed at Mobile World Congress

Historically speaking for iOS gamers, despite being among the largest mobile conventions in the world, Mobile World Congress hasn't ever yielded much we'd be interested in. It's a conference filled with ten million variations of every nearly identical Android device, the hardware that powers cellular networks, and a bunch of other highly technical stuff that has nothing to do with iOS games...

If you've been keeping tabs on the iOS 7 controller scene since they started appearing last November, you'll remember that the Logitech Powershell dropped its price down to $69.99 and the SteelSeries Stratus lowered its price down to $79.99, both from their original MSRP of $99.99. Well, Moga is getting in on the controller price-dropping bandwagon too, as their Ace Power MFi controller is currently on sale for $79.99...

Hot on the tail of the SteelSeries Stratus is another Bluetooth iOS 7 controller out of CES. It's by a new brand called "Signal" which I am having zero luck finding anything about because companies named after plain nouns are nearly impossible to Google. Regardless, the press release insists that the Signal team includes "leading hardware and software developers with extensive MFi partnership experience, backed by management with a history of success in consumer electronics."..

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