One of the big announcements last week from Apple was the announcement of a Mac App Store -- coming soon to both Snow Leopard and Mac OS X Lion (due in 2011).

Now we realize that not all of our readers are Mac users, but the announcement definitely makes waves in both the iOS and Mac communities. The App Store model has been a huge success with both developers and users. Users enjoy a centralized repository of apps that provide a seemingly endless stream of cool new toys. Meanwhile, developers are able to leverage the massive App Store audience to sell their goods and (hopefully) make a living.

Applying that model to the Mac seems like a natural extension. We've heard both users and developers reacting favorably and cautiously about the new system. We're not entirely sure the type of apps that will gain the most steam on this newly created ecosystem, but I do think that many iOS apps will find their to the Mac.

Firemint has already announced that Flight Control HD will be Mac-bound soon:

It's hard to say how Flight Control will fare using (we presume to be) mouse controls. But, Apple's invested heavily in laptop and desktop multi-touch pads which open up some really interesting possibilities.

Illusion Labs demoed this Multi-touch MacBook version of Touch Grind months ago, well before the launch of the Mac App Store.

We hope they'll dust off this code and see what they can do for the Mac App Store.

  • EastsideStompers

    Great stuff. As much as I love my iTouch, there are a bunch of games I wish I could play on a bigger screen, and I can't justify getting an iPad only for that, so this is a great solution for me. I wonder what the pricing will be like.

    • Noah

      I honestly can't see myself playing Flight Control with a mouse and keyboard.

      But if they port Real Racing? Sign me up...

  • Future777

    We are very excited about the Mac App Store. Count us in! :D

  • Dekon

    If they make the iPhone/iPod/iPad Games compatible(playable) with the mac (like it does to the iPod/iPad) it's gonna be great. If not...sorry but i'm not gonna pay again for games I already own.

  • kel808

    I only recently got a MacBook Pro and whilst I think the machine is great, the relative lack of games selection (without installing Windows as an additional OS) is something the Mac line would really benefit from being improved upon. Steam went some way to addressing this, and needless to say I am very much looking forward to the Mac App Store!

  • http://twitter.com/36peas Gareth Jenkins

    We'll certainly be targeting the Mac as a platform. In fact, the Mac App Store will bump it up above XNA/XBox for us.

    It's going to suffer poorly if we just see more upscaling of iPhone titles (adding value in iPad ports is one thing, Mac ports will take more effort to be convincing), however there's a lot of scope in the multi-touchpad/keyboard combination for 1st-party titles or re-focussed iOS titled.

  • Dyscode

    2 things
    1. price point - iPod touch is a LOT cheaper than the MacBook

    2. which is why the awaited BOOM of the Mac App Store wil not have that impact
    because it´s questionable that Apple can sell any number of Macs anywhere near their iTouch sales.

    Finally in the presentation video of the new AirBook they said they experimented with touchscreens but decides against it because it felt not good enough to them.

    Well I AM still waiting for a MacBook with a 13" Touchscreen.

    • http://twitter.com/Dd3m Chris Flores

      Well I AM still waiting for a MacBook with a 13" Touchscreen..

      Then you'll be waiting forever. Unless they can come up with some super duper solution that lets you use multi-touch comfortable and doesn't cause you arm and/or wrist strain, it's not going to happen.

      I don't think you get that these apps will be using a mouse. And also that not ALL apps - not many at all - will be on mac. Some iPhone apps are just so good that you wish you could have it on your desktop, and now you can.

      There are also /already apps for the Mac/ if you haven't noticed (=). But this way, they can get a bit more recognition, and users can "one-click purchase" them, for their convenience.

      • Anonymous

        How about... put it down? No one ever said a touchscreen MacBook had to involve the screen being vertical. Totally easy problem to overcome, just a matter of time if you ask me.

      • http://twitter.com/NoSuperMan ImNoSuperMan

        Yup. A convertible or simply an iPad like touch screen macbook with no keyboard/trackpad will be great. Pretty sure we'll see something like that from apple someday. But I doubt it'll be anytime soon.

      • http://twitter.com/NoSuperMan ImNoSuperMan

        Yup. A convertible or simply an iPad like touch screen macbook with no keyboard/trackpad will be great. Pretty sure we'll see something like that from apple someday. But I doubt it'll be anytime soon.

      • spiffyone

        Simple solution to the multitouch "problem" using a mouse? Don't use a mouse. The trackpad on the Macbook line can "read" multitouch gestures quite well, and as for the iMac all-in-one desktop line, there's always the Magic Trackpad, which is basically a larger version of the trackpad used on Macbooks.

        There. "Problem" solved

    • swarmster

      Apple doesn't need to suddenly sell a ton of Macs. There are already a ton of Macs out there and in use.

  • http://www.pendleproducts.com Martin_Pendle

    Don't forget on the control front that the Mac already has a lot of joysticks, wheels and pads available that the iPhone / iPad do not. This could be huge for mac gaming as well as Mac apps in general.

  • E_Domina

    This got me thinking that Apple needs to make a real computer tablet with osx not the ipads. anyway, how many people knew their macbooks had an accelerometer in it?

  • Phill

    Deeuurrr now I can buy the same game for the third time hooray!

    It's not even about gaming anymore, its about milking you idiots who have more money than brains.

    Give it a few weeks then you can buy a HD version. A few more and I'm sure a 3D one will pop up.

  • http://online-remi.com Remi Online

    i don't know what to say about the price..

  • B34$T

    TouchArcade won't be posting news on games for the Mac App Store will it? I mean the site is about 'Touch' gaming and as stated in the post, not everyone uses a mac.

    • http://twitter.com/zincous Zincous

      Mac AppStore games are 'Touch' gaming. Did you not see the Touchgrind video showing multitouch on the trackpad to play?

      Also, not everyone has an iPad either, but they post iPad game news.

  • Tcrowns

    This is getting a bit ridiculous, having to buy the same app for every idevice you have. This will defiantly leed to more piracy, I can't justify buying the same game for increasingly more money each time for slightly higher rez.
    I think Valves use of SteamPlay is a better model, getting your Mac and PC game for the same price and being able to play anywhere.

    • http://twitter.com/blinddirector blinddirector

      Are you saying that if you don't feel a game is worth the money, or you can't justify buying it for each device, rather than not downloading a game you feel that stealing it is morally just?

    • http://twitter.com/blinddirector blinddirector

      Are you saying that if you don't feel a game is worth the money, or you can't justify buying it for each device, rather than not downloading a game you feel that stealing it is morally just?

    • http://twitter.com/36peas Gareth Jenkins

      You don't have to buy the same app for every device. Just don't do it. You made your original purchase decision on the device support that was offered at the time you bought (e.g. iPhone).

      If the app is then later released for another platform (a platform - e.g. iPad, Mac App Store) then you make a separate decision about purchasing that (separate) title.

      Incidentally, the current iOS app store _does_ support a single purchase supporting multiple platforms (in the form of universal binaries) - but it's at the discretion of the developer whether or not to deliver an application in this way.

      If you like Valve's model for Steam then vote with you feet and go play there.

    • http://twitter.com/36peas Gareth Jenkins

      You don't have to buy the same app for every device. Just don't do it. You made your original purchase decision on the device support that was offered at the time you bought (e.g. iPhone).

      If the app is then later released for another platform (a platform - e.g. iPad, Mac App Store) then you make a separate decision about purchasing that (separate) title.

      Incidentally, the current iOS app store _does_ support a single purchase supporting multiple platforms (in the form of universal binaries) - but it's at the discretion of the developer whether or not to deliver an application in this way.

      If you like Valve's model for Steam then vote with you feet and go play there.

      • Noah

        How would you feel if you were forced to buy a jewel case CD if you wanted to listen to music in your car, an iTunes MP3 if you wanted to listen to music on your computer, and then another copy of the MP3 if you wanted to listen to music on your iPod? Upgraded your iPod to an iPhone? Another $0.99 please...

      • bomber

        The difference is that applications are not music files. The developer has to put considerable work into each port.

      • Noah

        That argument doesn't hold water... because in order for me to convert my recorded song to a format that plays on a physical CD or to an MP3 or ACC format requires encoding using the proper software, as well as my time.So while it may be easier to change the file format of a song vs. changing the core of a game to work with a different OS, both require work, and it's just as illegal to copy a song to different formats as it is to modify a game to work on different systems.The point being is this: we're spoiled when it comes to music. We buy a song once on a physical CD from Amazon or Best Buy and we decide we own the song completely, and we make copies for our friends, we burn the CD into our iTunes account, we re-encode the song to lossless AAC and then transfer the song onto every single music playing device we own... The question remains the same: Why is it so morally wrong to do the exact same thing to software we have purchased in the past? If I do the work to convert an iOS game to work with OSX, is it okay to do? Or do we see piracy as evil because Firemint did the conversion for us?

      • http://twitter.com/36peas Gareth Jenkins

        You know, I really don't want to get into some tit-for-tat comment war here - but seriously dude, WTF?

        See @Scott and @Philly's separate comments - both completely valid. Yes you would expect to pay for the paperback if you already bought the hardcover, and yes -- games have been ported and resold on many different platforms.

        If you'd like to go ahead and port Flight Control for Firemint, I'd suggest you do so - don't charge money for it, try not to piss them off too much and they might just be impressed. They might offer you some money for it. You know why? Because porting a game from one OS to another isn't like encoding an MP3. It's made especially tricky when we're talking about different control inputs and platform/hardware assumptions.

        In fact, while I'm on it, we've got a new iPhone title being submitted for v1 review end of this week. And an iPad title that we've been working on for a good few month will be done come the new year. Can I send you the codez for them so you can port them? I'll let you keep the ports for free. Because you know what? It costs me a lot of money, time and careful consideration to do them myself.

        But all of this misses the point: when you buy a CD (or an MP3 for that matter) there's a certain received wisdom about what you can do with it - in fact, that's pretty explicit in most channels now. When you buy game for your iPhone (or whatever gaming device) it doesn't claim (nor is there any common assumption - industry-wide standard is that you buy ports separately for each platform) that it will allow you to also download ports of that game on every conceivable gaming device and channel it happens to be ported to. In fact, in the case of the app store, it explicitly say's right there on the store "runs on iPhone and iPod Touch" or whatever's applicable.

        You make the purchasing decisions. Make them wisely, or - as I said in reply to someone else earlier - vote with your feet and go play elsewhere.

      • Noah

        However, if I buy a Hardcover book, and decide to go to Kinko's and scan all of the pages to a PDF... then print them out as a new softcover book, and decide to go to Times Square and hand them out for free... I'm allowed to do that, right?

        You seem to be arguing that because software takes considerable time and energy to port from one platform to another it makes it more socially unacceptable to bypass purchasing the software on different platforms.

        Give me the source code for Flight Control and I'll give it a shot... then after I finish the port to OSX, I'll give it away for free. No one should have a problem with that, right? Well... at least no one but Firemint.

        The same logic applies to the song argument... the record labels shouldn't have a problem with me copying my song (a song I purchased) to a different format and distributing it for free, but alas they do... yet, people still do exactly that every-single-day.

        So don't get all up in arms because someone bypasses a software developers attempt to charge a single user 3 different times for the same piece of software. And before you go off and say, it's different software because it uses different code, the same argument can be said for that MP3 song, or was it an AAC song or was it a WMA version? I can't keep track anymore...

      • spiffyone

        Um...it's called copyright infringement. Back ups for individual purposes are allowed. Massive redistribution is NOT. Why? Because the copying and distributing of said materials is the right held only by the copyright holder. Hence the term "copyright".

        And while there are a lot of people who copy and massively distribute files, it doesn't make it their right to do so. In fact, in kinda, y'know...puts them in the wrong. It's not within their rights. They have no valid ownership or rights over the work except their individual consumer rights over their unique individual copy of said work. Copying and massively redistributing copies of that copy does not fall within their consumer rights.

        If Firemint wishes to give you the code and ALLOWS you to redistribute said altered code, that's another thing altogether. They would have then extended their rights to you to do so. If not, however, it's not within you rights. That's that. Screaming to the high heavens about "having" to repurchase the game for another platform isn't a valid complaint; it's, quite frankly BUNK. You don't "have" to repurchase the game. You could ignore it on that other platform as no one is forcing you to buy anything. That's yet another right you have as a consumer. Copyright infringement isn't one of your rights, however.

      • EzeKiel

        @Noah - the only problem I see with your logic is that you tend to grave other people's hard work (YES, HARD WORK) and give it away for free in Time Square (wtf...) or port it to other platforms you don't have explicit permission from the author who spend days and nights working on that work.

        Why don't you try something. Make a game, FOR YOURSELF, graphics, sounds, logic, music, script, code, etc. create a company (you can start with an LLC if you don't want to setup the papers for a Corp or a S-Corp) , meet with your accountant and talk it over, go to the IRS and fill some more papers there, go to the bank and have an appointment to do your corporate account, invest some money in it, maybe gain some capital or try go indie with all that and then sit down and assemble a team or (as it looks for what you say) do every piece of the game development yourself.

        Then just give it away for free. In every single platform (I have a Palm Zire laying around someplace so you better do a port for that too).

        You simply assume software developers are greedy bastards because you see things on your perspective only, and until you stop doing that, you will keep being confused.

        To give you a fair example: I won't go into BestBuy and demand them a copy of the latest Call Of Duty just because I bought the PS2 version in 2001. YOU may think that gives you the right of having the PS3, XBOX, PSP and PC version for free; but no. you have to pay for them.

        Even if they are only ports, or include better graphics or not; even if they are exactly the same version with no changes, you have to pay.

        You talk about logic but you seem to not make at least not one single logical comment.

        If you have a game, then you have a game for that platform. That's it. If you want it HD or another version, you buy it. If it is Universal (developer's choice) then it's ok. If not, it's WRONG (yes, wrong) and you HAVE to pay for it.

        Software isn't mean to be free if that's not the developer intention. If you have a problem with that (like it seem you have) I recommend you to sit down and make your own games to give away for free. In every platform.

      • EzeKiel

        @Noah - the only problem I see with your logic is that you tend to grave other people's hard work (YES, HARD WORK) and give it away for free in Time Square (wtf...) or port it to other platforms you don't have explicit permission from the author who spend days and nights working on that work.

        Why don't you try something. Make a game, FOR YOURSELF, graphics, sounds, logic, music, script, code, etc. create a company (you can start with an LLC if you don't want to setup the papers for a Corp or a S-Corp) , meet with your accountant and talk it over, go to the IRS and fill some more papers there, go to the bank and have an appointment to do your corporate account, invest some money in it, maybe gain some capital or try go indie with all that and then sit down and assemble a team or (as it looks for what you say) do every piece of the game development yourself.

        Then just give it away for free. In every single platform (I have a Palm Zire laying around someplace so you better do a port for that too).

        You simply assume software developers are greedy bastards because you see things on your perspective only, and until you stop doing that, you will keep being confused.

        To give you a fair example: I won't go into BestBuy and demand them a copy of the latest Call Of Duty just because I bought the PS2 version in 2001. YOU may think that gives you the right of having the PS3, XBOX, PSP and PC version for free; but no. you have to pay for them.

        Even if they are only ports, or include better graphics or not; even if they are exactly the same version with no changes, you have to pay.

        You talk about logic but you seem to not make at least not one single logical comment.

        If you have a game, then you have a game for that platform. That's it. If you want it HD or another version, you buy it. If it is Universal (developer's choice) then it's ok. If not, it's WRONG (yes, wrong) and you HAVE to pay for it.

        Software isn't mean to be free if that's not the developer intention. If you have a problem with that (like it seem you have) I recommend you to sit down and make your own games to give away for free. In every platform.

    • http://twitter.com/ScottColbert Scott Colbert

      Suppose you bought a hardcover book, then it came out in paperback, then a large print edition, then a digital version and then an audio book, would you expect not to pay for those as well?

      • Noah

        And that's exactly the reason piracy exists... If people could buy the "book" and have it be available in all those formats mentioned, there would largely be no need to pirate the digital and audio book versions (which are much easier to pirate than the large print edition, which you'd have to resort to petty theft in order to obtain for free). It's the digital world we live in, and as they say... information is made to be free.

      • spiffyone

        Information? Yes. The work of another person? Nope. Artists hold rights over their work...even the extending of said rights to other persons. If those rights are not extended from the artist to whatever entity (be it corporate, or the mass consumer market), then that's that.

        All this neo-free age idea crap in the digital realm is just that: CRAP. Hell, even the copyleft and "free" movements in the digital realm hold their power in large part BECAUSE of the power of copyright. It's up to the artist or copyright holder to extend the rights, not YOU.

        Jeez louise the sense of entitlement some seem to have nowadays....

      • EzeKiel

        The poor fellow is confused to the point he started to believe a pirate is a guy sitting in front of his PC downloading apple games from some dark site full of Ukrainian porn banners.

        Good luck they made that Jack Sparrow movies; otherwise kids won't know what a pirate really is.

        You have your cards wrong my friend. You aren't on the free software development movement nor talking in behalf of it. Maybe you are just trying to feel better because you pirated some games?

        Well, if that's the case, it's on your conscience and I'm ashamed of you.

        But know this: you little rant here? nothing to do with freedom of information for everyone in the planet: just some unsolved issue you have with yourself.

      • EzeKiel

        That was for Noa btw, I pressed the wrong Reply button.

  • Philly

    Games have always shown up on different platforms since the days of 8 bit computers and consoles. I think having a marketplace to distribute Mac apps is a wonderful thing.

  • http://twitter.com/johnhood John Hood

    This should be an interesting development and some (if not all) developers may provide compatibility for both desktop and mobile platforms!

  • Robotron2084

    If I could play my iPhone/Touch apps on a Mac (I guess using an official emulator or interpreter), sort of how the iPad can play iPhone apps by pixel doubling, I would seriously consider getting a Macbook as my next computer.

    Is that at all in the pipe?

    • E_Domina

      that idea should apply to this. like a universal compatibility thing (including mac)

  • spiffyone

    BTW, to heck with the idea of iOS apps being pixel doubled to the Mac App Store. What Mac owners (and prospective owners) should really clamor for is EXCLUSIVE Mac apps being available on the Mac App Store. And that's why I'm excited about the possibilities of this. If Apple would get it through their heads to extend this to a new, more powerful Apple TV as well (again, with it's own App Store with EXCLUSIVE Apple TV apps) then they'd really have something on their hands with that product as well.

  • trrrouble

    I have a Magic Mouse and all touch-based games would work very well with it.

  • http://www.totalapps.net/ Totalapps

    games for mac are more interesting then for windows, so I hope to see more and more of them