Just last week we reported that Halfbrick Studio's popular iPhone fruit slicing game Fruit Ninja [99¢] had surpassed the 1 million download mark, and that a separate iPad version was on the horizon. Yesterday, a video showcasing the iPad version was released, and it's definitely looking impressive. The screen on the iPad allows for a larger play area and some frantic multitouch slicing, and the beefier processing power ensures everything runs at a silky smooth framerate – even in the new same-device multiplayer mode.

The multiplayer mode looks to be a huge draw for Fruit Ninja HD and it appears that at least one facet to this will be sending bombs over to your opponent, which should make for some heated two player battles. Take a peek at the new video for yourself:

To be perfectly honest, I think the guys at Halfbrick just like to tell their boss they're going to do some “work”, dress up in ninja and fruit costumes, and run around a playground all afternoon karate kicking each other. But you can't deny that they've come up with some high quality and humorous trailers for their games, which is always a nice treat beyond just straight in-game footage. This latest video has us really excited for Fruit Ninja HD, which if all goes well should be releasing this week.

  • http://www.fixmybugs.com LongSteve

    Fruit Ninja is probably one of the best things on the iPhone. I'm checking the app store daily for the iPad version :-)

    • Daniel bickers

      There is a pretty good one called veggiesamurai

  • http://www.fixmybugs.com LongSteve

    Fruit Ninja is probably one of the best things on the iPhone. I'm checking the app store daily for the iPad version :-)

    • Daniel bickers

      There is a pretty good one called veggiesamurai

  • Matt

    Coming soon to Veggie Samurai same device multiplayer and the ability to send poison to the other player

  • Matt

    Coming soon to Veggie Samurai same device multiplayer and the ability to send poison to the other player

  • http://jasonlawton.com jason

    i think the iphone version runs fine on the ipad.

  • http://jasonlawton.com jason

    i think the iphone version runs fine on the ipad.

  • George

    If ive bought this allready do i have to buy it again for ipad anyone?

  • George

    If ive bought this allready do i have to buy it again for ipad anyone?

  • Yoyoma

    Veg samurai may be a copy, but is a better game. I just prefer the fact that each veggie can be cut into 4 parts instead of just two, for extra points and bonuses if you consistently completely dice every veggie. Fruit ninja feels like a dummied down version (despite coming before). Maybe the iPad version will take a trick from veg Sam and improve it.

  • Yoyoma

    Veg samurai may be a copy, but is a better game. I just prefer the fact that each veggie can be cut into 4 parts instead of just two, for extra points and bonuses if you consistently completely dice every veggie. Fruit ninja feels like a dummied down version (despite coming before). Maybe the iPad version will take a trick from veg Sam and improve it.

  • chris

    i just tried them both, and i have to say veggie offers better game play. so if you have .99 and you thinking which one id say go veggie.

  • chris

    i just tried them both, and i have to say veggie offers better game play. so if you have .99 and you thinking which one id say go veggie.

  • Thomas

    Developers seriously need to hop on the "Universal App" bandwagon a little more. I'm what I'll call 'on the cusp.' My iPad has yet to be delivered. So the separate iPod/iPad versions just means they don't get my money until I get my iPad. Assuming that I still want the game by then, and that I haven't dismissed the developer due to this atrocious business model.

    • Thomas

      And now that I think about it, the problem won't be solved even once I have my iPad. What about apps that are released for the iPod but don't see an iPad release for weeks, or months? I'm not going to buy the iPod version just to find out in 3 months that they're making an iPad version for twice the price. The "separate binaries" model has to go!

      • http://spielhaus-ftw.com Stefam

        @Thomas and George
        You need to see this from the developers's perspective too. All apps that work well are due to hard work from their developers. And creating apps is not that easy. Most devs have a business to sustain. Creating universal apps at a low price just means that they have to a) pour extra work into making the app universal and b) loose sales on a dedicated iPad app.
        I am not talking about the big guys here. There are a whole lot of developers that do not sell hundreds of units a day. With limited time on their hands (some of them work on apps in their spare time) they need to think twice before commiting to extra work for no apparent benefit.
        Sure for the user it's nice to have universal apps. But don't forget the dimensions we are talking about. Even if a dedicated iPad app costs more than five bucks (given that it works well and reliable and helps with an aspect of your daily life) - there is still a world's difference between the alternative - destkop apps. Desktop apps are more expensive and... well - not mobile. So basically you get a dedicated, specialized app for a fraction of the price. That's a good deal for me. Paying an extra to have these apps on the iPhone _and_ the iPad is worth the money given the value that you get. And don't forget that after you spend five bucks, you expect the developers to update and expand the app for years to come - right?
        The separate binaries model has to stay. Even for technical reasons. The different screen size of the iPad allows for more sophisticated apps. Imagine if there were only universal apps. Less developers would build apps because of the added effort to support a stripped down resolution and screen real estate for apps that were ment only for the iPad.
        For me the key to iPhoen and iPad apps is an inteligent way of synching the data between them. I'd rather pay for the iPad app if I know that my data from the iPhone syncs over to the iPad instead of an universal app where I have duplicated data without sync.

  • Thomas

    Developers seriously need to hop on the "Universal App" bandwagon a little more. I'm what I'll call 'on the cusp.' My iPad has yet to be delivered. So the separate iPod/iPad versions just means they don't get my money until I get my iPad. Assuming that I still want the game by then, and that I haven't dismissed the developer due to this atrocious business model.

    • Thomas

      And now that I think about it, the problem won't be solved even once I have my iPad. What about apps that are released for the iPod but don't see an iPad release for weeks, or months? I'm not going to buy the iPod version just to find out in 3 months that they're making an iPad version for twice the price. The "separate binaries" model has to go!

      • http://spielhaus-ftw.com Stefam

        @Thomas and George
        You need to see this from the developers's perspective too. All apps that work well are due to hard work from their developers. And creating apps is not that easy. Most devs have a business to sustain. Creating universal apps at a low price just means that they have to a) pour extra work into making the app universal and b) loose sales on a dedicated iPad app.
        I am not talking about the big guys here. There are a whole lot of developers that do not sell hundreds of units a day. With limited time on their hands (some of them work on apps in their spare time) they need to think twice before commiting to extra work for no apparent benefit.
        Sure for the user it's nice to have universal apps. But don't forget the dimensions we are talking about. Even if a dedicated iPad app costs more than five bucks (given that it works well and reliable and helps with an aspect of your daily life) - there is still a world's difference between the alternative - destkop apps. Desktop apps are more expensive and... well - not mobile. So basically you get a dedicated, specialized app for a fraction of the price. That's a good deal for me. Paying an extra to have these apps on the iPhone _and_ the iPad is worth the money given the value that you get. And don't forget that after you spend five bucks, you expect the developers to update and expand the app for years to come - right?
        The separate binaries model has to stay. Even for technical reasons. The different screen size of the iPad allows for more sophisticated apps. Imagine if there were only universal apps. Less developers would build apps because of the added effort to support a stripped down resolution and screen real estate for apps that were ment only for the iPad.
        For me the key to iPhoen and iPad apps is an inteligent way of synching the data between them. I'd rather pay for the iPad app if I know that my data from the iPhone syncs over to the iPad instead of an universal app where I have duplicated data without sync.

  • george

    If ive bought this allready do i have to buy it again for ipad anyone? if so im out!

  • george

    If ive bought this allready do i have to buy it again for ipad anyone? if so im out!