Category Archives: Prices

Earlier this month we saw the release of Hail to the King: Deathbat [$4.99], a product of Subscience Studios and the band Avenged Sevenfold. Members of the band grew up playing video games, and when it came time to make their own, they wanted to create an homage to the games they loved playing back in the '80s and '90s. The combat and magic system in Deathbat is pretty simplistic, and the difficulty can be unforgiving. Those are the reasons I love the game so much, but those are also the reasons a lot of people didn't like the game so much. Opinions, you know? Because of the polarized feelings towards Deathbat, I imagine there were a lot of people who might have been interested in the game but were stuck on the fence. Well, if that describes you, now might be a good time to jump off the fence as Hail to the King: Deathbat is currently on sale for $1.99, down from its normal price of $4.99...

Yesterday, I remarked that it's rare for games to get complete overhauls in the way that Wave Wave [$2.99] just got. Well, Halfbrick just made me look stupid, as Age of Zombies [$0.99] has just gotten a "Season 2" update that takes the game and revamps its visual style. Gone is the pixel art, and in is a new 3D style, albeit one that tries to stay loyal to the original game's art. Halfbrick says that they're doing this in preparation for future content coming to the game. They've taken a keen interest in adding new stuff to the game, as there's been pretty much a new update every few weeks at this point. And with 3D, it may be easier to make new content without creating new pixel art – and with resolutions getting all screwy, going to 3D may be more future-proof...

Veteran Developer Hero Craft is bringing the Sons of Russ straight to your face with WarHammer 40k: Space Wolf[Free]. This visual stunner brings the table top classic to life in a squad based strategy card skirmish with the low low entry fee of nothing. If it sounds too good to be true, well there are some twists on the road to destroying the xeno threat. This game has some truly fantastic features intermingled with some pretty big roadblocks. If you can suspend your disbelief (and maybe an upturned wallet), you'll find a pretty solid game here. Available exclusively for iPad 3 or higher, iPhone 5 or higher and requiring an internet connection, the game is a little less accessible than most universal apps. With gameplay very similar to the PSP's Metal Gear Acid, I was really excited to get into what promised to be a tactically deep strategy game...

Thomas Jansson doesn't believe in the saying "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" philosophy, clearly. His game Wave Wave [$2.99] has gotten a complete makeover in style and structure this week, with a 2.0 update that changes just about everything but the very core of the gameplay. The immediate change is the visual style, going from a contrasting black-white with triangular visuals to one that is based around specific colors, with text that's got very chunky pixels. The original version borrowed a lot with its menus from Super Hexagon [$2.99] – while an update changed things, this is definitely a step forward and a step back in regards to Wave Wave's relation with Super Hexagon...

For far too long, Surgeon Simulator [$5.99] fans who have wanted to play the game on the go have had to deal with the tyranny of playing on the iPad, and not on their phones. Well no more must you iPhone owners who want to transplant alien organs while sitting on the bus have to suffer! Bossa Studios has today made Surgeon Simulator universal, adding iPhone support to the previous iPad exclusive app. Certainly, any game going universal is a welcome sight, but given how this game is really based on precise actions, this might be better on bigger screens. ..

It was just about a week ago that Konami soft-launched their Yu-Gi-Oh! card battling game, Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Generation [Free (HD)], but already it appears the game has launched worldwide, popping up in the US App Store earlier today. Based on the original, physical Yu-Gi-Oh! card game, Duel Generation features over 6,000 cards, online multiplayer, and special weekly events. Perhaps most importantly, it allows you to play offline against a computer AI and features a single-player campaign, which is a nice feature for those who don't always have internet access...

Super Crate Box [$1.99] has definitely spawned a few games inspired by it, to say the least, though games cutting too close has been a sensitive subject. But the game owes a lot to the original Mario Bros. in terms of structure, and Woah Dave [$1.99] from Choice Provisions, the former Gaijin Games, manages to take more after Nintendo's original than Vlambeer's modern. And it does a great job at making its own blend of challenging survival and situation management that I quite enjoyed...

Let's be frank, video games based on team sports aren't known for revolutions between updates. That reputation was mostly earned by them being among the first types of games to adopt a yearly release schedule. As it turns out, games take a lot of work to make, and if you're committed to meeting a particular date every year, there's only so much you can risk upheaving. Given this long-held tradition in the genre, I almost instinctively wasn't surprised to find that NHL 2K [$7.99] is, shall we say, a modest step forward from the last hockey game 2K released on iOS. Shaking away that initial gut reaction, I then remember that this isn't a yearly update, and it has in fact been over four years since NHL 2K11, and in that context, it's almost embarrassing how little has been done here. If you're looking for a decent hockey game and you don't have NHL 2K11, it's easy enough to recommend NHL 2K. It's competent, and there's honestly little competition even across the entire handheld spectrum. If you do have 2K11, the question of whether it's worth it gets a bit trickier...

If you loved Final Fantasy Tactics [$13.99 / $15.99 (HD)] but thought it would be better if all of the characters were anime girls, then Japanese indie SRPG Rime Berta [$4.99] may have caught your eye. It's a clear tip of the hat to games like the aforementioned, and in a lot of ways does a very competent job of aping its overall presentation and many of its systems. It's a bit lean on content, which is perhaps understandable given the size of the developer, but its biggest failings are in the fundamentals. It's a serious problem when there are quite a few excellent strategy RPGs on the App Store that, even if nothing else, manage to nail those aspects. In the end, Rime Berta is all dressed up with no place to go...

'Sleep Attack TD' Review - Just a Microphone Short of a Beck Song

If you think you're all Tower Defense'd out, be prepared for the tables to turn. Ayopa Games have set their sights on a time honored genre that is, to be honest, usually pretty outdated. Sleep Attack TD[$2.99] is their first foray into tower defense. Our forums have been buzzing about this game for good reason. With the bright asthetic Ayopa is known for and some very unique gameplay, Sleep Attack brings some much needed defibrillation to a category of games that seems to be in constant danger of completely flat lining...

'Super Glyph Quest' Review - Bigger And Better Than Before

Earlier this year, a cute little puzzle RPG named Glyph Quest [Free] was released. It was one of those games that was pretty hard to put down until it was finished, but it was unfortunately also one of those games that finished a bit too quickly. The game used the shareware-style model of being free to download and play up until a certain level, at which point you could pay to unlock the rest of the game. That's a great way to do things, but it hid one of the game's most interesting gameplay features behind that paywall, so I think a lot of people ended up sleeping on it. Well, the developer's back to take another kick at the can with Super Glyph Quest [$2.99], a sort of-sequel that keeps the same great core of the original while simultaneously attempting to address most of its faults. Depending on what your particular issues were with the first game, there's a good chance you'll find this version of the game to be good enough to kick the original off of your device for good...

Last week we told you that Herocraft's tactical turn-based strategy game set in the Warhammer universe would be launching worldwide on October 28th. And do you know what today is? The 28th! Warhammer 40,000: Space Wolf [Free] is now officially available. Space Wolf is a turn-based strategy game with a heavy card element, but this isn't some card battler. People have likened it to the Metal Gear Ac!d series on the PSP, which is basically all I need to hear to download and check it out...

Remastered Version of PC Point-and-Click Adventure 'The Longest Journey' Launches in New Zealand and Australia

Classic-style adventure games have seen a resurgence over the past several years, but at the turn of the millennium things weren't all that rosy for the genre. Adventure games had ruled the early and mid '90s, but as console hardware improved and twitchier games like first-person shooters began to rise, our old friend the PC adventure game looked like it was going the way of the Dodo. That made the release of Funcom's The Longest Journey in 2000 pretty awkward. The game received massive critical acclaim, but sadly there just wasn't a whole lot of mainstream interest in adventure games at that time...

'Tilt to Live: Gauntlet's Revenge' Review: And I'm Dead Again

Sure, sometimes developers can give reasons for why they want to charge more money for something that are utter poppycock. Granted, I've known One Man Left since 2010, and I take them at their word that Tilt to Live: Gauntlet's Revenge [$2.99] was becoming too big and too separate to be just an add-on to Tilt to Live 2 [$2.99]. But in playing it, I think the position is really quite justified. This is pretty much its own game, only filtered through Tilt to Live's aesthetics and controls. And it winds up being this challenging gauntlet that's well worth checking out...

'Ghost Blade' Review - Something Wicked This Way Comes

If you asked me a couple of months ago to make a list of game types that were highly unlikely to ever be realized in a satisfying way on a touchscreen, I can guarantee that stylish action games would be on the short list. The sub-genre launched when wunderkind director Hideki Kamiya sat down to make another Resident Evil game, decided that it would be more fun if every attack felt as good as doing a headshot with a shotgun, and ended up creating Devil May Cry. One game does not a sub-genre make, but once Tomonobu Itagaki created his masterpiece re-imagining of Ninja Gaiden, we were off to the races. It's not the most prolific genre, probably because it's so hard to do right, but it's seen its share of hits including the mainstream-friendly God of War series, the campy and cool Bayonetta, and the amazing parry-focused Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance. These games are usually characterized by their highly-technical, deep combat, where players are graded according to how well they can dance to the game's beat. This usually involves a lot of different buttons, and we all know how well that usually works out on a touchscreen...

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