Category Archives: iPad Games

Ammo Pigs [$1.99] is a game that figures that it just needs to do one thing and one thing only, and get that right. From Cascadia Games, it's an homage to the DOS era of gaming and its action-platformers. You control a pig with a gun who must shoot his way through a dozen levels full of sentient butcher knives, spikes, walking guns, and various robots out for your bacon. If you played 2-Bit Cowboy [$0.99] you may recall that game had a level-based structure that still had some aspects of open-world games. This game uses a bit more of a compromise in level design, as the levels have open-world elements where you have to backtrack to hit switches, with some hidden things to find. Still, they feel a bit smaller and more straightforward, but not in a bad way, but in a way that feels more focused...

This Thursday marks the start of the Chinese New Year, and in case you weren't aware, it's the year of the Goat. In celebration of this momentous occasion, one of our favorite iOS platformers of 2014 Bean Dreams [$0.99] has received an update with two new sets of levels, one featuring a rideable goat named Goatee and one taking place in the fiery Temple of the Dragon...

I love the idea of Adventure Time Game Wizard [$4.99] because of the power of its license. Pixel Press Floors [Free] was cool technology, in the way that it let people sketch out levels on paper using a system of glyphs, and then take a photograph to scan them into the game. It's a remarkably cool tech and idea. But really, the greatness of the idea and its reach was somewhat limited by the new intellectual property and the limitations that Pixel Press had in terms of PR and reach on the App Store. Thus enter Cartoon Network. The kids love them some Adventure Time. So, why not combine that license and the Cartoon Network marketing muscle with the latest Pixel Press tech? What is here is not just a competent platformer, but an incredibly powerful creation tool that I think could be really great because of the way that it opens up creation to a young audience in an accessible way...

King of Thieves [Free] is a game that shows the problems with review scores, because it exists at two diametrically-opposed extremes. On one hand, it's a remarkably cool concept: it takes auto-running trial platformers and puts it into a Clash of Clans [Free] style raiding system. You can design a dungeon, crafting gems to become more powerful, while trying to keep other players from getting your gems by way of making a dungeon too powerful for them to successfully raid. All the while, you're raiding others and playing through the singleplayer campaign, getting more money, upgrading your stats and traps to be better at raiding and to make raids tougher. But it's a game with a particularly annoying energy system that raises questions about its fairness. It's a game that doesn't go down smooth, particularly if you're not a free-to-play fan...

Much as I love it, I have to admit that video pinball is a very, very strange thing. They're sort of like those homemade recipes for Ecto Cooler that you can find around the internet: a shadow of the real thing, an attempt to replicate an incredibly tactile but now nearly-extinct experience. For most people, there haven't been any pinball tables around their locale since Clinton was in office. I wouldn't be shocked if many of our readers have never laid eyes on one in their lifetime. But for those of us who love them, if we can't wrap our fingers around a real machine and build the callouses on the palms of our hands by slamming them into the side of a wooden box to nudge a steel ball a half-centimeter off its course, we'll take what we can get. We'll take the video pinball. Because even though there's an unquestionable component of the game intrinsically tied to physical sensations, the games themselves have strong merit on their gameplay. The lights and sounds pulled us in, but the gameplay is what kept us coming back...

The long wait for Solomon Dark, the latest in the Solomon action-RPG series, is finally at an end. Sadly, it's not a happy ending, though there is a silver lining. Bad news first, it hurts less that way. According to a post on developer Raptisoft's new forums, Solomon Dark is officially canceled. The game was caught up in a legal situation for a year, and during that time, apparently several things happened that resulted in the game's cancellation. The developer didn't elaborate on what those things might be, but it's understandable. Having to sit on a project for a year can cause all kinds of issues. The developer may release the unfinished version at some point as freeware, but it's safe to say that likely wouldn't be on the App Store...

Update Mondays: 'Junk Jack X', 'Candy Crush Saga', 'Gems Of War', 'Subway Surfers', And More

Hello everyone, and welcome to the week! It's time once again for our look back at the noteworthy updates of the last seven days. Too many updates this week, my friends. Far too many. Some TouchArcade favorites, some App Store favorites, and even a couple that fall into both categories. Of course, you can keep an eye out for updates yourself using AppShopper Social [Free], the watchlist in the TouchArcade App [Free], or by participating in the TouchArcade forums, but this weekly summary is here to fill in the things you might have missed. Let's dig in!..

In August of last year, Sunnyside Games released The Firm [$0.99], a twitchy high-scoring game based around stock trading. It featured simple swipe left or right controls for buying and selling stocks, making it a perfect one-handed game, and it also boasted some lovely pixel art and a main mechanic that was super easy to understand but very difficult to master, as cliché as that may be. The Firm was a pretty simple game, and Sunnyside has had plans to expand the experience pretty much since launch. It took a bit longer than expected, but this week the big version 1.1 patch for the game has arrived adding all sorts of new stuff. ..

Hands-on with 'Sick Bricks' - A Mobile-First Toy Adventure

iOS was a little late to the game when it came to action-adventure games that featured real-world toys. Disney’s iOS version of Infinity [Free] is restricted to its (admittedly cool) toy box mode while Skylander’s Trap Team [Free (HD)] is the first title on iOS to offer the full console package. While both have enjoyed some success on iOS, they are still ports of console juggernauts. Sick Bricks by toymaker Spin Master looks to change all that with a new universe of animated shorts and miniature toys all grounded in an action-adventure title designed for mobile...

If you think about it, WayForward Technologies is one of the original indie stars of handheld gaming. They first gained notice when some poor soul who was assigned to reviewing licensed claptrap on the Game Boy was playing some games based on Sabrina: The Animated Series and realized they were decidedly less bad than usual. A couple of years after that, they released their first game based on an original property, Shantae, which ended up being one of those games that sold far fewer copies on release than its eventual demand would call for. The game's charming presentation and ambition to actually make a decent Game Boy Color game won it plenty of fans. Combined with its relative rarity, its high quality gave it a near-legendary status and elevated its developer in the eyes of core handheld gamers...

RPG Reload File 025 - 'Dragon Fantasy Book 1'

Hello, gentle readers, and welcome to the RPG Reload, the weekly feature where some of us may be losing our hair, but we certainly aren't losing our thirst for adventure. Each week, we dive into the bountiful past of App Store offerings, looking for previously-released RPGs that we can pull out and get reacquainted with. It's a chance to take a deeper dive on games that we may have already reviewed in the past, and a sort of check-up to see how those games are getting on these days. I try to present a fairly balanced schedule that represents the broad spectrum of RPGs out there, but I need your help to make sure I'm not missing anything. Each month, the readers have a chance to select the game I'll be writing about. Hey, you're a reader! If you'd like to vote, simply head on down to the comments, pop into the Official RPG Reload Club thread in the forums, or tweet me at @RPGReload with your selection. The next reader's choice article is coming up in the first week of March, so get your vote in as soon as possible!..

Man, what is the deal with Sensible Soccer? That game is popular for its top-down soccer play and two-button controls, a formula that I see a lot of other soccer games try to replicate. The latest is Active Soccer 2 [$3.99], a soccer game that I wish would try to break free of the two-button limitations, though I do find the soccer action to be quite entertaining here...

'Final Fantasy Legends: The Crystal Of Time And Space' Hits The Japanese App Store

Just a couple of months ago, Square Enix announced they would be releasing a sort of follow-up to Final Fantasy Dimensions [Free] called Final Fantasy Legends: The Crystal Of Time And Space. Well, I guess time flies when you're having fun and developing free-to-play mobile games, because the game just hit the Japanese App Store earlier today. It is, as promised, free to download, and unfortunately for those holding out hope that it might have chapter unlocks similar to Dimensions, it seems that Square Enix is once again chasing the dragon...

'Dark Echo' Review - Silence Is Golden, And So Is This Game

While I love blockbuster gaming as much as the next person, there's no question that the ever-increasing budgets and thinner margins have made the whole upper-end of the video game business disappointingly conservative from the player's point of view. Iteration is great. It's how games have come as far as they have. Yet, as an exclusive diet, playing it safe can sometimes be a little bland. It's a good thing we've got smaller developers who can afford to take risks on crazy ideas, because without such occasional spices, the hobby would be a lot less interesting. Dark Echo [$1.99] is one of those games that simply couldn't exist under the traditional model, but I'm ecstatic it does...

Ever since it’s unveiling over two years ago, Midnight Star [Free] has had some lofty expectations thrust upon it. One consistent theme we’ve heard since its announcement was a promise for a control scheme reimagined for touch-based input. As the game slowly soft launched we realized that such a reimagining would also come with a free-to-play system for monetization. With its worldwide launch last week, we’ve finally had a chance to check out both its claim for improved controls as well as test out its freemium elements. After some extended time with this first-person shooter from Industrial Toys, I came away impressed with the controls and the amount of content offered, but was left lamenting its free-to-play elements...

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