If you heard some thumping this morning, relax. It was just me kneeing my desk over this bit of news: Amanita Design’s iOS port of its beautiful point-and-click adventure game, Machinarium, will only run on the iPad 2. The studio explained the move on its blog, stating that it “needs quite a lot of memory and fast CPU, so it works well only on [the] iPad 2.” That sounds reasonable enough, I suppose.

Amanita then apologized to original iPad owners after stating that there are “no compromises” in the iPad 2 version of the game. Capable Android tablets and the RIM Playbook are still slated to receive their own versions of the title.

In some lighter news, Machinarium has been submitted to Apple certification and “should be” available for download this coming September 8. Have fun, iPad 2 users. Tell us how it goes. Wait, don't -- I'll cry. I'm sensitive about this.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001209473382 Henrique Cabral

    if it needs "quite a lot of memory and cpu" I guess I'm skipping it.

    • Adams Immersive

      Only when it’s running, though!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QCWDU7VI4VK5RS2VLRQ653I5Y4 Sidney Patrick

      I just paíd $22.85 for an íPäd 2 64GB and my girlfriend loves her Panäsoníc Lümix GF 1 Cämera that we got for $38.78 there arriving tomorrow by UPS. I will never pay such expensive retail prices in stores again. Especially when I also sold a 40 inch LED TV to my boss for $625 which only cost me $62.81 to buy. Here is the website we use to get it all from, Centb.cöm

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001209473382 Henrique Cabral

    if it needs "quite a lot of memory and cpu" I guess I'm skipping it.

  • Vicente Ragal

    Those are... Sad news.

  • Twobobwatch

    I've been waiting for this! Finally! Although, I hate to hear that its exclusive to iPad2. Thats a lot of players left out in the cold. 

  • Brendch06

    "works well only on ipad 2" > don't care to optimize the game at all

    There's better looking games running on iPad1 right now, don't see why this is anything more than laziness on the part of Amanita.

    Oh well, they don't get my money, that's all.

    • http://toucharcade.com Eli Hodapp

      Do you have some kind of insider knowledge of the codebase and engine running Machinarium that you can make claims about the developer being "lazy?" Machinarium was released before the iPad was even announced, they couldn't have possibly built the game with the platform in mind, at all, on any level.

      • Anonymous

        I think he means that if they spent time, they could have easily ported it to the original iPad... I have it on my Mac as part of the Humble Bundle and I can attest that it's no Real Racing in terms of intense graphics.

      • http://toucharcade.com Eli Hodapp

        But no one outside of the developers currently know what went into the porting process. My point is, without knowing what's involved, it's incredibly ignorant to do the typical knee-jerk "heh, lazy dev ain't gettin' my money" response. For all we know they could have come to the decision based on the iPad 2 being able to more or less run the game with some tweaks versus some incredibly involved complete rewrite to get it to run on older hardware which likely is understandably difficult to rationalize when you need to sell your games as close to 99¢ as possible to avoid further angering the customer base. It's safe to assume that if it was easy to get it to run on both iPad models, they would have done it.

    • http://twitter.com/stuartcarnie Stuart Carnie

      Do you have any idea what you are talking about?  The iPad 2 has a significant performance delta to the iPad 1.  

      There are many reasons that they may require an iPad 2.

    • Archagon

      The iPad 1 has 256MB of RAM, and running apps aren't even allowed to use all of it. Given that the game has so much high resolution art, I'm not surprised by this decision.

      • Mr Damien

        high resolution art ?
        Are you kidding ?
        I bought it on the Mac App Store it's not HD at all.

        They are just using some crap flash-to-iOS engine that's all. When I see games like RAGE, and all others amazing 3D HD quality running on iPad 1 and their game in 2D with 2 animations on screen requiring an iPad 2 ...

        I will pass too.

    • http://profiles.google.com/jack.shiels.123 Jack Shiels

      It is not laziness. The SGX 535 GFX chip onboard the iPad has a fillrate capable for small screen devices such as the iPhone. Transparent imagery is very fillrate intensive. hence the probably abysmal performance on an iPad 1. Not their fault, Apple's fault.

      The iPad has 4x the resolution of the iPhone. It makes sense - when I add any transparency based imagery to a 3D object on the first iPad the FPS goes to < 10.

      • Puoweas

        "4x the resolution of the iPhone"
        ???

        iphone : 960*640

        ipad: 1024*768

  • Anonymous

    well that sucks. i was looking forward to it on ipad since my computer wouldnt even run it after i bought the steam version.

    • Relytgninroht

      Did you try to run it full screen? Try running it windowed, because that's the only way I could get it to work on my computer. There is actually no compromise in resolution running it windowed. In fullscreen it has a huge black border around the playing area. It can be a bit buggy at times, because it is coded completely in flash (for some odd reason).

      • Anonymous

        yeah thats the only way i could even get it to run. my computer is just too old. 2007 HP desktop. my lame integrated video card can't even handle a 2d game

  • Anonymous

    This is why I need an iPad!!! :/

    • Martin Clifford

      iPad 2, to be exact.

  • http://twitter.com/sstaver Stephen Staver

    I don't know what could cause the game to not run on an old iPad, (yet can on those other platforms) But since the game is originally entirely flash based, it's cool that they ported over,  but I'm glad I have an iPad 2, so it won't be a big deal.
    But still, I'd wish for as many people to play this wonderful game as possible. 

  • http://twitter.com/sstaver Stephen Staver

    I don't know what could cause the game to not run on an old iPad, (yet can on those other platforms) But since the game is originally entirely flash based, it's cool that they ported over,  but I'm glad I have an iPad 2, so it won't be a big deal.
    But still, I'd wish for as many people to play this wonderful game as possible. 

  • http://twitter.com/VULTR3 Mike

    The artwork is totally awesome. I'm glad I have iPad2, whoever doesn't have one can look at my screen, I guess. If they give me candy.

  • http://twitter.com/myglasseye my glass eye

    I'm sorry but this game is years old and is just a point-n-click adventure. It's great, fantastic even, but to my mind while the iPad 1 can run the same FPS and driving games that the iPad 2 can run, the only reason this isn't going to run on an iPad 1 is because it's built on Adobe Air and the developer doesn't want to put the effort in to actually optimise the game for the iPad. And so I suspect the iPad 2 will probably only just cover the stupid requirements that Adobe Air needs to run.

    Just a guess. If I'm not bang-on I bet I'm close. No way this game does anything whatsoever that an iPad 1 couldn't handle if it was coded properly, no way at all.

    • Guest

      Telltale's games also run poorly on the iPad 1. You have to accept the fact that John Carmack doesn't write adventure games, creative writing types do. Writers need a high level programming language, something without a lot of fussing over mallocs and shader bit-twiddling. They need the freedom to shuffle the whole game around to suit the narrative, not patch the narrative around whatever works out best for the graphics pipeline.

      Air did a decent job getting Machinarium finished, shipped, and sold on 3 platforms. True, there is no physical law preventing one from writing an adventure game in C and squeezing every cycle out of it. The market for adventure games just isn't big enough to pay for that kind of work.

  • Relytgninroht

    And stuff like this is why iOS isn't a super viable replacement for actual gaming consoles. There is way too much fragmentation for it to remain stable. That's basically the exact same reason PCs have yet to overcome consoles. It's just way too expensive to upgrade every year (or every other year) just to play the latest games.

    If you really want to play it just buy it off Steam. Pretty simple.

    • http://toucharcade.com Eli Hodapp

      Not really when you consider a good condition iPad retains an insanely high resale value even through new generations of hardware compared to a gaming PC that's essentially worthless a year later. If you're diligent about selling your old device you can upgrade with every generation and still be far ahead financially when you factor in the cost of iOS games compared to consoles.

      • Relytgninroht

        I can see what you're saying, but as somebody who sells their iPod Touch every year to upgrade, it certainly is not super cheap. You normally only really get 50%-75% of the new retail value. Most consumers really don't want to have to worry about stuff like that. Then with the iPhone you have to factor in a 2 year phone contract. Due to the contract, you either have to buy your way out, or wait until it's up and get around 25% of retail value due to it being two generations old. If the next Angry Birds game requires an iPhone 5, I doubt very many people are going to want to deal with the hassle of upgrading just to play with a new app. The only people I can really see upgrading are Apple fanatics, or the hardcore iOS gaming crowd. I just can't picture casuals doing that. I'm not saying iOS gaming is going to crash and burn (PC gaming hasn't yet, and as you stated it's even more unstable), I'm just saying that there is way too much fragmentation, and while ideally there shouldnt be, a lot of people just want to stick with their old iPod, iPhone, or iPad.

      • http://toucharcade.com Eli Hodapp

        Modern consumer electronics are designed to be disposable, and most normal people (read: "casuals") seem to realize this-- Which largely explains why every time Slashdotters attempt to make a big deal out of the lack of a user-replacable battery in Apple devices everyone else just shrugs as they replace their devices with new ones before the battery ever becomes an issue.

        Sure, there are still hold-outs that come from the camp of "I bought this Betamax player in 1982 and I expect it and every other piece of electronic gadgetry to both function and remain both relevant and usable until the day I die." ...But if that describes you, you're basically not the target customer for anything Apple sells, and need to come to grips with that sooner or later.

      • http://twitter.com/JaredTA Jared Nelson

        I think, sometimes, at the end of the day, you just have to face the facts that you won't be able to play certain games. If this particular game is that enticing to you, then you can find a way to upgrade. Otherwise you just keep on keepin' on, my friend.

      • Anonymous

        There is no "fragmentation" - only old devices. That is not fragmentation. Fragmentation would be if 10 new devices all came out at the same time, and certain apps or games only worked on one of them. Look at Xperia Play. That is fragmentation.

        Of course you are right with everything you said (except that iOS is "fragmented"), but what you don't seem to understand is it just doesn't matter. 
        Why do you think the iPhone 4 is still the best selling phone after being out for what, 18 months? Because there are still plenty of people upgrading to it from their old 3GS, 3G or original iPhone (and new iPhone consumers of course). *Because* not everyone rushes out and buys the new model, but they have to wait until their contract runs out, or whatever. These people don't read blogs and don't read about how the new Angry Birds would hypothetically be for iPhone 5 only. They buy their new device. They see what's out there and they buy some apps.

        Apple isn't going to stop making new devices. Developers aren't going to stop making new apps. You are allowed to stick with your old devices. Developers are not obliged to support older devices. Your old apps still work. If you want a new app that only works on a new device, well, wait until you have enough money to buy it, and then buy it. The game will still be there.

        I really don't even know what point you are trying to make. In other news, the sky is blue, we are human, and Apple continues to make a shit-load of money despite this imagined "fragmentation."

      • Relytgninroht

        Sorry okay? I wasn't trying to start an argument. I was just trying to say that it is something that you have to take into account. And, even if there were no old iOS devices, the platform would still be fragmented- they've got the iPad, iPhone, and the iPod Touch. There are some games that don't run (or don't run very well) on the iPod Touch (due to memory constraints) that will run on the iPhone and iPad. There are also some iPad exclusive games that won't run on either the iPhone or iPod Touch. They Are all a part of the iOS platform, but not every app works on all three. That's fragmentation. And in response to Levi and Jared, I'm not the type of guy who holds onto outdated electronics, and I actually already own this game on Steam as I alluded to in my original comment. And I guess the issue I pointed out really isn't valid for younger people, but it definitely is for older people.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

        What you are complaining about, essentially, is owning a GameBoy Color and not being able to play GameBoy Advance games on it.  This is not a new condition Apple has cooked up to spite you, or anyone else who bought one of their older devices.  They simply put out a piece of upgraded hardware, and you chose not to buy it.  As a result, the Advance section of the store isn't on the table for you yet.  If you buy the DS (iPad 3) when it comes out, guess what?  You'll have access to everything behind it and the people with Advances will be crying about being unable to play DS games because they didn't upgrade.  It's a vicious circle, and one you have to be prepared to accept if you're playing video games.

      • Manuel

        Yeah but the Gameboy Advance lasted more than 2 f*** years , and they are still selling the ipad 1 .... apple annoys me!!, i feel that my iPod Touch 4g is crap now (yaaaay 256 mb of RAM ._.) if i had an expensive iPad i would feel a lot worse.

      • http://toucharcade.com Eli Hodapp

        If Apple annoys you don't buy their products, problem solved.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

        It was found pretty quickly after release that the iPod Touch had 256MB of RAM vs. the iPhone 4 having 512MB.  If you pre-ordered blindly or didn't do your research, I don't know what to say about that but tough luck.

        As for the console analogy, the GameBoy Advance hung around a long time, yes, but the DSi came out pretty quickly after the DS Lite, and that had exclusive eShop games you couldn't play on the DS or DS Lite.  And then the 3DS has come out rather quickly after the DSi XL.  Technology has continued to leap forward at an increasing rate these last 10 years, and this is par for the course with playing video games.

      • Relytgninroht

        Just to clarify once more: this isn't affecting me. I am fine upgrading, and I usually do. I wasn't complaining about anything- I was simply being critical. I was just pointing out an issue with iOS gaming being a little fragmented. While I can see how your Gameboy argument makes sense, it's totally apples and oranges. When a new iPhone comes out, it is a continuation of the line- an updated version. The difference between the Gameboy Advance and Gameboy Color, is that they are not part of the same product line (although they do share a name); same with the DS and 3DS. All iOS devices access the same store (iPad apps not visible for iPhones/iPods though), whereas the DSiware store couldn't be accessed by older DSs at all. So on one service you are able to download apps for a non-supported device, whereas the other is completely separated. I'm not opposed to Apple upgrading their hardware line- if they stopped that'd be even worse.

      • Relytgninroht

        Just to clarify once more: this isn't affecting me. I am fine upgrading, and I usually do. I wasn't complaining about anything- I was simply being critical. I was just pointing out an issue with iOS gaming being a little fragmented. While I can see how your Gameboy argument makes sense, it's totally apples and oranges. When a new iPhone comes out, it is a continuation of the line- an updated version. The difference between the Gameboy Advance and Gameboy Color, is that they are not part of the same product line (although they do share a name); same with the DS and 3DS. All iOS devices access the same store (iPad apps not visible for iPhones/iPods though), whereas the DSiware store couldn't be accessed by older DSs at all. So on one service you are able to download apps for a non-supported device, whereas the other is completely separated. I'm not opposed to Apple upgrading their hardware line- if they stopped that'd be even worse.

      • Relytgninroht

        Just to clarify once more: this isn't affecting me. I am fine upgrading, and I usually do. I wasn't complaining about anything- I was simply being critical. I was just pointing out an issue with iOS gaming being a little fragmented. While I can see how your Gameboy argument makes sense, it's totally apples and oranges. When a new iPhone comes out, it is a continuation of the line- an updated version. The difference between the Gameboy Advance and Gameboy Color, is that they are not part of the same product line (although they do share a name); same with the DS and 3DS. All iOS devices access the same store (iPad apps not visible for iPhones/iPods though), whereas the DSiware store couldn't be accessed by older DSs at all. So on one service you are able to download apps for a non-supported device, whereas the other is completely separated. I'm not opposed to Apple upgrading their hardware line- if they stopped that'd be even worse.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

        Actually, while the eShop on DS is a weaker analogy, the GameBoy line is a perfect one.  All three devices in the GameBoy line were backwards compatible while increasing the capacity and resolution of the screen, and providing more power and memory for developers to work with.  Sounds a LOT like the current line of iTouch devices. 

        All the apps I've seen that require specific devices to function properly say explicitly in their description that they require a particular model or higher.  Perhaps Apple could separate them better by creating flags developers could place on an app, and users could filter by, but the current app store is absolutely a GB, GBC, GBA situation, just without shelving divisions a brick and mortar store would have for the various consoles.

      • Guest

        The App Store is taking care of that well enough with the user review process. The writeup must be VERY clear if last generation's hardware won't cut it, or the ratings take a beating. Users that complain about not working on an iPhone 1 get laughed out of the room(was this helpful?). There's always a bit of drag on the ratings until the app works out a community enforced level of compatibility. That's enough to make the difference between being a thousandaire, and shooting into the top 10.

      • Relytgninroht

        I agree with what your saying. While it isn't much of an issue right now, I think it may become one later. I think Apple is probably going to end up addressing it in some way if it does grow into a bigger problem. I don't think staying current is much of an issue for most of the readers of this site- I think it's more of an issue with the older generations.

        I'm actually surprised at how big of a response my criticism received. It was pretty fun going back and forth with you guys.

      • Relytgninroht

        Geez dude, calm down.

      • Rasterico

        Or you could just sell your current phone before the contracts up and buy a sim free model from Apple like I did.

        I'd had my 3GS for roughly 5 months when the iPhone 4 launched, straight away I lined up a buyer for £250 cash and placed an order for a sim free iPhone 4 with Apple.

        A quick call to vodafone later and my micro sim was on it's way to me, let my contract carry on as normal (due for renewal December this year) and will renew it with an iPhone 5, only this time I'll have a sim free iPhone 4 for sale!

        Work it out, if I sell my iPhone 4 for £300-£350 I'll have actually made money on my initial outlay of £500 for the iPhone 4 as my 3GS sold for £250 too.

        Easy when you know how ;)

    • Anonymous

      So, you say that iOS devices and PCs suffer from the same problem, and then recommend buying it on Steam?

      You do realize, people are buying iPads instead of PCs these days: i.e. not everyone has a PC capable of playing this game, but they might have an iPad 2 that is. Merely pointing out the hypocrisy in your "suggestion."

      • Relytgninroht

        I'm not saying I hate either platform. I'm just pointing out a few of the issues. As a matter of fact, I play with BOTH platforms more than I play consoles. I'm not the type of guy that just blindly proclaims something is the greatest thing in the world without realizing its limitations and flaws. If you want, I can also point out all the flaws with dedicated gaming consoles too. Being critical of something doesn't mean you hate it. I'd be pretty sad if PC and iOS gaming suddenly disappeared...

  • Anonymous

    its just simple, if you really wants to play the game then upgrade your device guys.no need to put some harsh words towards the developer.they know the best for their game.
    focus on the game and blame it if it doesn't work as it supposed to be but not because it doesn't run on your device. 1 and half year is old enough for me.

  • Rgergerger

    thats just plain ridiculous. the game is running easy on my 200Mhz / 256Mo ram windows xp laptop. since when is the ipad 2 the only device capable of running this 2D crap ? not mentionning that the iphone4 has more or less the same hardware than the ipad2 but I'm no expert, someone detail the differences if they are so huge between ipd2 & iph4...

    • Anonymous

      iPad 1 = A4 chip
      iPhone 4 = A4 chip
      iPad 2 = A5 chip

      there you go.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

      The iPad 2 is a dual-core version of the iPad 1's CPU with a faster graphics processor and double the RAM of the original. 

      People need to remember that this is a somewhat older game, made by an indie studio who may not be willing to risk major rewrite costs to optimize the game for the iOS platform up front.  It's better that they put it on a device that can run the ported version (assuming the allegations of it being an Adobe AIR port are true) at a decent performance rate than to release a game that's effectively broken for both devices and have the user base angry.  If this makes them a decent profit, maybe they'll invest into recoding the game for the platform and optimize it for the iPad 1 at a later date.

  • salem

    when the ipad 3 will come up on the market, I'm sure we'll find some devs ready to port half-life, and swear that the superior hardware of the ipad 3 is the only one believed to endure the required processing power.

  • Anonymous

    Awesome game, picked it up in the humble bundle.

  • Anonymous

    Do you own an iPad 2? If the answer is "no," then you aren't a member of Amanita's target audience and your argument is about as relevant as arguing that your 3DS games don't work on the DSi XL.

    • Anonymous

      I would hope that they want their target audience to be as large as possible!

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

        Target audience also has to take into account the cost of development.  If a version that runs well on the iPad 2 costs them very little, and a version that runs well on both costs them a lot, they need to weigh the risk assessment of cost vs. demand when deciding which to gamble on.  Seeing as they've had their game on Steam for quite a while now, they probably have a good idea of what kind of numbers they're likely to see AT BEST, and must have decided to take the safe approach first and see if they make enough to justify optimizing it later.

      • Guest

        Amen. The devs are much better off getting cracking on the sequel than rewriting their last game. The new game will generate fresh revenue on every platform, instead of chasing down the one potential customer that missed every sale and doesn't have a PC, Mac, or Linux. 

        By the time they get around to optimizing anything, the market could change anyway. Adobe could make a better flash converter, which would make their work moot. Androids could take over, the iPad 3Ds could require a full rewrite of their z-buffer code.

  • Awesome

    Crappy porting, thats all. I bet an Ipad will be able to run it in the web, with some flash supported browser.

    • Andy Raczynski

      seconded on the crappy porting job.  

  • Brian Hobbs

    Argh!  What??? I can't believe it doesn't work on the iPad!  What a bunch of lazy chumps!  They should have put in the extra effort to allow me be able to play it!  Robbing me of this experience is immoral, and should be illegal!  I deserve to play it, after all I've done for them! 

    Oh wait, what have I done for them?

  • Dimitri

    Another one to air my disappointment. It's the author's right of course to go with the iPad  2 for whatever reasons they may like but I also think it's has something to do with being reluctant to port it to the 'lesser' device (in my case, my beloved iPad 1). Because it's too timeconsuming? After all, it's just a flash-game at its core and ran fine on my less powerful netbook. How hard could it be to port it to a stronger device?

    Oh well, pity! Chiming in another : "bought the game once and being left out to buy it another time..." Pity for them I suppose?

    • Anonymous

      Are you sure your netbook is less powerful?  I don't think an A4 is more powerful than a 1.6 Ghz intel Atom (making an assumption, as that's about what's in most netbooks) in raw CPU crunching.  Machinarium didn't really run that well on my netbook, it ran acceptably... But definitely not at full speed.  And your netbook most certainly had more than 256 MB of RAM.

  • Kibikiri

    I find the "if you don't like it, don't buy Apple products" logic to be seriously flawed.  99.99% of apps developed for iPad 2 run on iPad 1.  Owners of the "older" technology have, I think, a legitimate gripe about a game that seems like should be able to run, based on more graphically intensive games that already do.  I get that Apple devotees/apologists (Mr. Hodapp, I presume?) are willing to rebuy the baby-stepped incremental relaunches each year, but I wonder how the general public feels about this direction.  IPad's a monster in the shopping world right now, and while the faithful might be willing to pony up to play Apple's game, I wonder how Mom and Dad and Grandpa Joe will feel about it...I'm not grouchy about it, personally.  But, long term, I wonder how this will play out for developers...

    Either way, tough break for us early adopter/late upgraders, but hey, the developers think it is in their best fiscal interest to keep this game to iPad 2?  I wish them well.  Now, back to playing Dice Soccer and dreaming of Swords and Poker HD.... 

    • http://toucharcade.com Eli Hodapp

      Apple is the most valuable company in the world because people buy their products, and re-buy their products. Rationalize this however you want, but that's the fact of the matter.

      • Guest

        /He said, from his PCjr with an AOL sidecar. Thanks IBM, rebuying stuff is for suckers!

      • Kibikiri

        Heh.  I'M rationalizing?  I think arguing that their profitability justifies whatever they do as a company is a pretty strong rationalization, as well.  But, I certainly don't deny they are successful.
        I also don't begrudge them their success (indeed, I enjoy their products enormously), but I don't think their business model is sustainable indefinitely and I hardly think that this success validates some of the decisions they make that affect their customers.  
        Mr. Hodapp, I find your loyalty to this particular brand curious.  Do you vigorously defend McDonald's when someone has a gripe with their menu choices because they sell the most hamburgers?  Will you verbally spar with anyone who besmirches the good name of Exxon because they refine the most oil?  This kind of rabid consumerism always seems sort of strangely misplaced to me...it is a bit like school spirit in high school: fine if the rest of your life is in order, but otherwise, sort of a waste of time.  I mean, I understand people's need to validate their own purchases, but at what point do they look at the company they've chosen to champion and say, "hey, I'm kind of being exploited for my loyalty." 
        No one is attacking you, Mr. Hodapp, when they are critical of Apple or app developers.  You understand that...don't you?

      • http://toucharcade.com Eli Hodapp

        I'm not "vigorously defending" anything, I'm merely applying some logic to the situation-- Something that's often sorely lacking in these types of "debates" as hell hath no fury like a scorned gamer.

    • http://toucharcade.com Eli Hodapp

      Apple is the most valuable company in the world because people buy their products, and re-buy their products. Rationalize this however you want, but that's the fact of the matter.

  • Fokion

    It's probably just a memory issue. My old single-core Atom netbook with 1 GB could  burn through the game. Plus, we all know that iOS devices are not that great for porting Flash games. It's just the way it is. Apple has chosen not to include proper Flash support in their machines, there's bound to be some adverse consequences somewhere down the line. In this case, it's probably having relatively high requirements for relatively simple games. People who chose to go Apple knew about that (or should have known).

    I do own an iPad 2 as a replacement to the aforementioned netbook and I might buy Machinarium again just to support the devs if the price is right. After all, I got the PC version for a couple of bucks when Amanita did a "pay what you like" promotion.

  • Realsfg

    Bad code. Played the PC-version and the game does no magic that would involve any expensive calculations, 3D visualization or other stuff. Loved this game and its mood. Sad to hear something like that.

  • http://www.vitaltitles.com/ Nick

    Well this has obviously created a slew of debate.

    I would like to know the details about whybthis won't run on an iPad 1. I appreciate the developer has certain limitations, time, coding, whatever wise. But I do also agree that after playing it on the PC, it is hard to see its inability to play on an iPad 1.

    Again, I don't know the full deal on the code behind it so I'm only speaking in conjecture, but I do see what people are saying about games like Rage, Monkey Island, Tales of Monkey Island, World of Goo, Real Racing 1 and 2, etc.

    How can these games work?

    As for not putting money into recoding, do they realize how much money World of Goo made? No matter what, I'll buy it the second it releases, but that doesn't mean I'm not still confused.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

      As someone mentioned above, Telltale's games do "work" on iPad 1, but they have performance issues all around.  On the iPad 2, they work perfectly fine due to the increased power of the device. 

      I suspect this case is a situation of the overhead from Flash conversion requiring more memory than is available on the iPad 1 after the OS is loaded.  You've got to realize that even on the iOS devices with 512MB of RAM, developers still only have ~350MB to work with.  So if you cut that in half it's a pretty damn small amount of memory to use for games.

      • Atomsk100

         i think you may be mistaking ram and filesize? 256MB - 512MB is more than enough ram for any modern current gen game even. the ps3 has 256, and the xb360 has 512. you would be hard pressed to need to allocate memory like that for rendering. memory "management" on the other hand is likely to blame. whether due to the games engine, or to the method they are using to port it to ios. thats a decision they've made.

        i dont think they were being too smart about it. If this port is taking them any effort whatsoever and they expect to see returns on it, they should be aiming to support atleast 50% of the appstore market. with ipad2 only they are sitting at maybe 2-3% (my guess).

        Ive played the game enough to agree with most here. asset-wise they are well within the capability of even a 3G level device.. provided the code be optimised. So i wont calls the devs lazy.. because theyve consciously made a choice to do this, but the reason they gave seemed to say that the hardware left them with no choice. which is not true.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

        As I said, it's a distinct possibility that the Adobe conversion API adds considerable overhead, eating up RAM that could otherwise be used by an app that was coded in Objective C from the ground up.  That's basically the same thing as rewriting the game however if it was built in Flash originally.  And the 125MB likely available on the iPad 1 after the OS is really not a lot of RAM these days (World of Warcraft routinely eats up 1GB of system RAM on my system, and Minecraft eats almost 400MB just on the login screen). 

        You're also confusing a dedicated gaming console with a multi-purpose computing device.  All the chips on the XBox 360 and PS3 are dedicated and optimized toward running game code that was written explicitly for that platform.  Not so on the iPad and iPhone.  They're expected to be able to run a word processor, web browser, stream video, etc. all as well as they play a game.  It's the reason why GTA on the PC has always had such horrendous framerate issues before major patching and optimization.  The architecture of the device its running on plays a huge part in what kind of resources the game requires to function.  So while GTA4 may run on 512MB of RAM on the XBox, it might take a dual-core 2GHz processor and a GB of RAM on the PC to achieve the same thing, and that's not taking into account how much of the video card's dedicated graphics RAM it's using.  I'm pretty sure the "system on a chip" package that is the A4 is sharing RAM between the CPU and video functions, further pushing the available resources down for gaming purposes.

        The bottom line is, the game is a port and not a rewrite.  There are concessions that have to be made in any release.  Perhaps this is just a test-bed to try and make some extra money from their game as cheaply as possible, and if the iPad 2 crowd show a good response, they'll code their next game dedicated and optimized for the system.

  • Vhs2708

    Glad to see all the casual objective criticism from iPad 1 owners.