What if you had an idea for a game....

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by Papa Deuce, May 27, 2015.

  1. Papa Deuce

    Papa Deuce Well-Known Member

    May 15, 2013
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    but had no clue how to make it. Who could you bring it to to develop it? I think I have an idea for a good game or set of games, but I can't share it until I know my ideas are safe. I have not seen anything like what I am thinking about on any platform.

    Really it is 3 games that could be combined in one or sold separately, I guess.
     
  2. bigrand1

    bigrand1 Well-Known Member

    Apr 23, 2010
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    Geriatric Party Animal
    California, USA
    I'm in that same predicament right now also! I got 3 up my sleeve-- one, I know for sure would kick ass, and there isn't anything like this in the store! Can't break it out 'til I hook up with the right folks 'cause I don't want it to get ripped off. I've got some art for the way I want it and the mechanics kinda set. Need probably a couple people to do the 3D graphics, music/sound, and figure out how best to work the IAP. Not really desperate and will wait 'til I feel I have the right crew and the time's right. But sometimes I ask myself who would be good? When is it right? Now, I've co-developed a few games here, done my thing--being the big creative idea guy, doing the writing, descriptions, some marketing work, voice-overs, and some other stuff. I wish I could just do it all myself! Unfortunately for me, the procrastination goes on at this point and it doesn't get done. Oh well. Maybe I'll get it together sometime. Who knows? Maybe not!:confused:
     
  3. AwesEmz

    AwesEmz Active Member

    May 19, 2014
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    Do you know if there are any game jams local to you? That's a great way to meet teams and get a quick sample of the work and what they're like to team with. If you can, check out some of the previous games made at jams and see if any stand out to you, then maybe reach out and ask to join the team at a future jam. You don't have to give your ideas up for it but you will get to know a load of local developers and potentially find the right team to help you build your game.

    Also try Construct2 or GameMaker. Even if you don't have much experience with developing games yourself there are loads of tutorials, you can pick it up pretty quick. It could allow you to build a quick prototype of your game that you can show to potential devs.
     
  4. Papa Deuce

    Papa Deuce Well-Known Member

    May 15, 2013
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    I will look for those.... I have the one game fully fleshed out on paper. It is a game we played in my area when I was a kid... Actually all of them are, and I think they would be great as a package.
     
  5. danglingneuron

    danglingneuron Active Member

    May 22, 2015
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    #5 danglingneuron, May 29, 2015
    Last edited: May 29, 2015
    Finding indie/hobbyist developers is not hard... there are thousands of them out there. the tricky part is how you manage the ownership of the game and then subsequent revenue.

    One way is to hire the developer on a contract basis and have em develop your game. If its not outright contract hire and have some kind of ownership/revenue sharing then it depends on how good your idea is. e.g. I would only work on something that I think is viable and is of my interest as well. I have published 6 games across mobile platforms - as a part time hobby. Since its not my primary source of income, I only work on stuff that I am very interested in, something challenging for me.

    You also cant really "protect" your idea. The ideal solution would be to connect with a developer that is in close proximity / friends etc that you could trust.

    Best option would be to pick up a free software like Scirra Construct or YoYo GameMaker which is more visual than programming and try a few things yourself .. IF... you want to have fun and learn something new. BUT it takes time / practice and experience to be able to actually make something polished which will have half a chance when released.
     
  6. Elsa

    Elsa Well-Known Member

    Apr 7, 2015
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    Arendelle
    #6 Elsa, May 29, 2015
    Last edited: May 29, 2015
    a) let it go
    b) pay a developer service to make your game on demand
    c) start learning on how to make games. Are you good with art (2d,3d,pixela art, sound, animations, rigging, music, writing etc.), can you code? If none of these, then start learning both or just one aspect of it. If you are skilled in both, then you can make your own game. If you are skilled in one, then you can get someone else on your team, or you can lend a hand to another person with their project and he will later return the favor.


    But either way, you need to do something. Just sitting there and thinking about ideas and designing the game on paper means nothing. Everyone can/has done that and a lot of design usually changes in the development process and a lot of ideas don't make it through to the final product.

    You could just start submitting your idea to some indie developers who might grab it and make the game, but don't expect it to be as you planned it and don't expect any credit for it. The likelyhood of that happening is pretty low though, because as I said, everyone has ideas.


    You're pretty much going to get laughed off the stage if you bring the "I have an idea, but I'm afraid someone will steal it, because it's so good and original" argument anywhere near any serious developers.
     
  7. Glorkbot

    Glorkbot Well-Known Member

    Aug 14, 2013
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    Cartoonist
    I've always just shared my ideas freely online and no one has ever "stolen" them. I've always been able to continue on with creating my thing with no ill repercussions from sharing throughout the process.

    Anyhow, ideas are cheap. Everyone has them, and usually more than one person gets the same idea at the same time.

    It's the execution of the idea that matters, not the idea itself. That's why ideas are not protectable by copyright.
     
  8. Papa Deuce

    Papa Deuce Well-Known Member

    May 15, 2013
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    Probably not in my case. These games were very local to where I grew up. They are "street" games that us inner city kids had to create as we had nowhere to play except on the street. When I moved just 11 miles away, kids had NO CLUE what these games were.
     
  9. Elsa

    Elsa Well-Known Member

    Apr 7, 2015
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    Arendelle
    He isn't talking about your specific idea. He is talking about game ideas in general. Everyone has them and indie developers will rather work on their own ideas than someone elses, because there's no shortage of ideas.

    Your idea is worthless if you don't take any steps in order to make it into a product.

    Harsh, I know, but it's the truth.
     
  10. I think dear dreamers you should all gather up in this thread and make your own game dev team, find some people, who can go further than just ideas and together bring this ideas to life. Because If you will continue to do nothing but protecting your "ideas" you will end nowhere and that doesn't do nothing to anyone of you.
     
  11. liteking

    liteking Well-Known Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    Indie Game Developer
    Common problem with newbies is that they think their ideas are so cool.
    I used to think like that. After nearly 10 years of professional game development, I believe ideas are cheap, execution is everything
     
  12. september

    september Well-Known Member

    Sep 14, 2012
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    I think there's a danger in saying ideas are cheap, yeah everyone has them and there's no shortage but truly unique gifted ideas are far and few. Execution is the tipping point for bringing out the best in an idea or dooming it to fail, so I agree it is important and it can actually make a so-so idea decent, but it's not a replacement if the core concept is ho-hum.
     
  13. Exact-Psience

    Exact-Psience Well-Known Member

    Jan 12, 2012
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    The Work-At-Home Guy
    Philippines
    The words "ideas are cheap" is a metaphor. It simply means there is no shortsge of it.
     
  14. september

    september Well-Known Member

    Sep 14, 2012
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    The meaning that you mentioned I think you'll find is already in the item that you quoted, so I'm a bit lost to be honest.
     

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