iPad Restart your phone

Discussion in 'iPhone and iPad Games' started by AchillesReborn, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. AchillesReborn

    AchillesReborn Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2008
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    #1 AchillesReborn, Dec 8, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2008
    Having read about 6 trillion 'one star' reviews citing that a game wont start up, despite deleting/re-downloading etc, I figured the developers needed some advice.

    I recommend that developers put a huge warning on the screen the first time the game is started, strongly recommending that they restart their device. Surely the developers are very frustrated that their games are getting negative reviews just because people are failing to restart their devices? Anyhow, at least it would save us having to wade through the obviously flawed itunes reviews to find some decent ones.

    BTW I'm aware that some games already do this (e.g. Fieldrunners had this warning).
     
  2. iGewappnet

    iGewappnet Well-Known Member

    Nov 17, 2008
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    Mainz, Germany
    Someone in a German forum said he gave 2079 a one star review because it always crashes at start. I answered that he should restart the phone. His reply was: "I don't want to restart my phone for a game. If the game does not manage to handle the memory without a restart, the one star review will be correct." I guess the developers should get Apple to fix the general memory management to avoid those comments.
     
  3. AchillesReborn

    AchillesReborn Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2008
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    Or people should learn to live within the confines of the system they are using. The iphone needs restarting after installing new software to remain stable. Simple as that. Refusal to acknowledge this requirement is a pathetic reason to dislike a game. I wonder, does he also refuse to restart his computer after installing software, and then deem the software to be unworthy?
     
  4. Carlos-Sz

    Carlos-Sz Well-Known Member

    Nov 5, 2008
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    It's amazing how people can be so naive, not to say ignorant.

    +1
     
  5. JuncoPartner

    JuncoPartner Well-Known Member

    Nov 2, 2008
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    Developer, Redwind Software
    Dublin, Ireland
    Agreed, very frustrating. I have had a few users who at least had the brains to email me about problems installing our game. After telling them to restart it all worked fine. But unfortunately we've still managed to accrue a few 1 star reviews from people who didnt know to restart and never bothered contacting the support email.
     
  6. Oliver

    Oliver Well-Known Member

    Ignorant? It's not our (customers) fault that the iPhone OS is broken and needs a restart from time to time (not only after a fresh install!). The devs know more about it and they have to make sure, that their app runs smooth in the operating system they chose as their ideal developement platform. So if I have to constantly reboot my iPhone just to make an app work, something *in this app* is wrong. I'm a programmer myself (but not for the iPhone). I know that it's a pain in the ass to fix problems which are not yours, but you have paying customers, you have to make sure that everything works smooth on their devices, regardless the status of their devices. That's your work.

    As a customer I'm really not interested whether the real cause is in the OS or in the app - it just has to work. Our customers want solutions for problems and in this case I am the customer and expect a solution for this problem - either a real fix or a workaround by the devs. During the first weeks of Asphalt or Brain Challenge I was afraid every single time I finished a race or opened the menu or loading screen, because in 70% the game crashed. That's a no-go-situation!

    Here are some more examples:

    2079: New in this version tells: "Aggressively reduced the overall memory consumption of the game, this helps prevent the startup crash people are reporting"
    Weightbot: Dev tells me (email) that that's Apples fault and that I should reboot (every morning!). We talk about a weighing program with the look of the Apple stock widget and two views here, not about Brothers in Arms.

    Now, from a paying customers perspective, which is the right answer?

    And, once again, to make that clear: As a customer, I'm really not interested in who's responsible. If it does not work, someone has to fix it. Fast. Now. And that's you, the devs, not Apple. That may suck, but that's how it's going.
     
  7. Paulio

    Paulio Well-Known Member

    Dec 3, 2008
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    Local IGA (supermarket)
    Tasmania, Australia
    I find it hard to believe that people STILL don't know that restarting there device frees up the RAM. I've seen the warning on so many game descriptions it's not funny, not to mention how strikingly obvious it is -"hello, IT, have you tried turning it off and on again?". If something doesn't work, rebooting is the first thing to give a shot at! Why don't people know this?! iDevice's require a computer, so people know that if you get the bluescreen of death, or the pinwheel of death for macs, you restart. So why don't people know to do this with their phones? Are the majority of iPhone owners idiots? It would appear so, "Oh a message saying my device is low on memory! What a sh!t game! One star!"
     
  8. Oliver

    Oliver Well-Known Member

    At first, the iPhone is not a phone, but a multitasking computer. But it's called iPhone, which makes the confusion complete. Think back to your Nokia times: Did you ever had to reboot these devices? No! They worked for days, weeks and even months without problems. Now the smartphones arrive, we have multitasking, we have more ram, we have different apps. But the iPhone hides that. It looks and feels a bit like a sexy singletasking device, with the listenable exception of the iPod.

    Technically, the iPhone even quits apps when you switch them. Only the Apple stuff keeps running, like Mail and Safari (it even loads web pages in the background), but they are also limited in RAM and Safari even removes other open "tabs" when requested by the operating system. So, the interesting qustion is of course: Where's the free/freeable RAM? ;) I thought that 3rd-party-apps are limited to 10MB RAM... (?)

    Regarding customers and rebooting to solve problems: I use a Mac at home. I use them since 2002 because I don't want to reboot after installations or other stuff. They should just work. And they do. I expect the same from my iPhone. As mentioned before and regarding the question on RAM above: If there are some bugs which do not free up the RAM, someone has to fix it. To blame the stuff on Apple does not help. To tell us we have to reboot from time to time also does not help. The apps have to deal with that and free memory whenever it's possible.
     
  9. Paulio

    Paulio Well-Known Member

    Dec 3, 2008
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    Local IGA (supermarket)
    Tasmania, Australia
    Yeah your right. I was just having a refreshing rant.
    I forgot to say before that devs should mention that best results occur if you restart AND also if you open up the iPod app, the safari app, and basically all apps you've used between the time of your last restart and in each one hold the home button down for three seconds, or until, the app quits. This basically force quits an application and frees the RAM asociated with that application.
    I can't be certain, but this alone may even be just, if not more, effective than just restarting?
     
  10. Oliver

    Oliver Well-Known Member

    That depends whether these apps autostart at boot ;) I don't think that they do.
     
  11. Frand

    Frand Well-Known Member

    Many problems are fixed with communication and documentation as opposed to coding.

    There's very little that a developer can do if an operating system has broken memory management (aside from trying to lower memory use).

    If an application is unstable unless the device has been restarted, then it's the developer's responsibility to make sure users are aware of this. If a user refuses to follow a developer-provided installation procedure, then the developer can't really be blamed for the application misbehaving.

    As a side-note, on the iPod touch 1G that I use for my games, I've never had to restart the device after installing a game.
     
  12. AchillesReborn

    AchillesReborn Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2008
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    #12 AchillesReborn, Dec 8, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2008
    Still, as it stands, that's how the iPhone works. You can expect it to manage memory as well as your mac notebook, but that doesn't change what it is. You need to start your phone after you install new apps in order to get optimum performance. Whether it's down to a broken OS, hardware etc. is irrelevent for the app you are using. The iPhone obviousl y has limitations; deal with it. It can't deliver ps3 standard graphics, it can't have controls to match a mouse+keyboard, it can't install new apps and still run at it's optimum level without a restart. Developers can either design their games with optimum levels in mind, requiring a restart after new installations, or attempt to produce games at a level below the optimum ability of the device because some consumers can't accept that the device needs to be restarted to perform at an optimum level.
    Personally I'd like developers to maximize the performance of apps. I know the offshot of this may be lazy developing for games that don't need to use the full power of the phone, but if that means that games that DO need it CAN use it, it's worth the trade off. Install, 1 minute restart, bamm.
     
  13. eeenmachine

    eeenmachine Well-Known Member

    Oct 24, 2008
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    Independent Game Developer
    San Diego, CA
    I find it frustrating how many users are wary to re-install or update an App because they think iTunes will charge them again!
     
  14. JuncoPartner

    JuncoPartner Well-Known Member

    Nov 2, 2008
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    Developer, Redwind Software
    Dublin, Ireland
    Are you serious?

    Hang on now till I email Steve and ask him for access to the iPhone OS codebase so I can fix the problem.

    After that I'll email the other Steve and ask him for access to the .NET framework codebase so I can fix the broken Garbage collector.

    Next?
     
  15. Eric5h5

    Eric5h5 Well-Known Member

    Eh? You can't do much of anything with 10MB of RAM, at least if you're doing 3D stuff. The video RAM alone (shared) is 24MB. Technically it's something like 80-90MB total that you have access to, but I've seen people reporting problems when going much over 60MB.

    --Eric
     
  16. powderski11

    powderski11 Well-Known Member

    Nov 16, 2008
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    LOL. That is exactly why i still have A nokia, and got an itouch instead of an iphone.
     

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