iPad developers and pricing shenanigans

Discussion in 'iPhone and iPad Games' started by case, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. case

    case Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
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    #1 case, Feb 6, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2009
    Ok, so unless you are new to the App Store, you are well aware that prices on apps fall a few days/weeks after they are released.

    Most users have wizened up to this game and will refuse to purchase desired apps until a 1st or 2nd price drop.

    I have noticed the incubation time between when a release hits the store and when the price first slashes has shortened immensely.

    Developers need to realize this is the reason sales don't flood in in the first 24 hours (unless your app sucks to begin with).

    Many have actually realized this and release their apps with appropriate prices initially, but I am sick of seeing 4.99 releases drop to 2.99 in less than 24 hours after release.

    Do these guys think we're stupid? I'm sure there are plenty of new idevice owners getting burned by this still, but honestly quit with the games. There is no reason to inflate prices at release.


    ...if anyone gets the reference, this situation reminds me of the hula-hoop release montage in the Cohen Bros. film the Hudsucker Proxy. watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ng3XHPdexNM

    but really guys, all you are doing is penny pinching new users who are not familiar with App Store shenanigans.
     
  2. goblues11

    goblues11 Well-Known Member

    Oct 12, 2008
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    You are right
    This is a huge problem
    The good news is that smaller devs are starting to have intro sales instead of later sales
     
  3. HJJ

    HJJ Well-Known Member

    Dec 2, 2008
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    If you don't like the prices, don't buy. There's no reason to still be complaining about this. Do you think developers LIKE dropping their prices so soon after release? If a game is released, and I want it, I'll buy it. I've spent $5 on a game at release only to have it quickly slide all the way down the ladder until it was finally free. Does that make the game any less enjoyable for the time I had it prior to the sale? No.

    If you want to wait around indefinitely for every game to go on sale, great. But, frankly, I don't have the time to waste. I'm too busy picketing my local grocery stores for always changing the price of bananas.
     
  4. Donburns99

    Donburns99 Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2008
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    ^ This, I agree 100%.

    The picketing comment made my day, thank you. :D
     
  5. BrushMyNoseOff

    BrushMyNoseOff Well-Known Member

    Jan 3, 2009
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    #5 BrushMyNoseOff, Feb 6, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2009
    It's called capitalism. While yes, it doesn't feel great to see the app you just purchased go on sale, it is what it is. We are not talking huge sums of money here. The story will be different wit the premium App Store, I'm sure of that.

    If I think something is not worth the asking price, I will not purchase it or wait to see if it goes on sale. Some titles, I buy automatically regardless of the price; that is based on the trust I have in particular developer.
     
  6. Jorlen

    Jorlen Well-Known Member

    Jan 7, 2009
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    I'm against picketing, but I just don't know how to show it.
     
  7. Donburns99

    Donburns99 Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2008
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    LOL

    I had to think for about 30 seconds what you were getting at and then it hit me. :D
     
  8. eeenmachine

    eeenmachine Well-Known Member

    Oct 24, 2008
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    Just to be clear:
    Large Developers (EA etc.): Launch high then drop the price.
    Small Developers: Launch low (because they don't get the coverage big boys do) then raise the price.
     
  9. RPGGuy

    RPGGuy Well-Known Member

    Sep 3, 2008
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    As a developer I noticed a trend... 25% increase of sales on weekends. Be happy that we don't raise prices on weekends like gas stations do.
     
  10. Jaytee

    Jaytee Well-Known Member

    Jan 13, 2009
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    Jesus, calm down people. The app store hasn't even been around for a year and it is, essentially, a brand new kind of marketplace. Most of the developers are just trying to make a living at this and the only way they're going to be able to do that in the future is if they experiment a little now. The typical rules of capitalism don't apply here, because supply is essentially unlimited and feedback is immediate.

    Everything will be ok.
     
  11. case

    case Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
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    Michigan
    look, I'm not qq'ing in the least.

    It just strikes me as totally illogical to do this on the developers perspective using itunes connect.

    release the game at a reasonable price first and raise it as sales pick up, word gets out. release limited/time restricted free version first, etc..

    there are many answers to this, but there's no reason that it has to be such a silly game as it stands. I WANT the dev's to get better sales, but some still do not understand how to work the system appropriately to grow sales.

    I don't even use the app store, so it's no skin off my back. I posted because watching the price feeds lately has been just plain silly.
     
  12. VWXYZ

    VWXYZ Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2009
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    I think its okey if a dev want to mkae a "early premium entry"

    You can pay 4,99 and get this game now, or wait 4 weeks and get it for 2,99.

    If its was a huge game like PayBack I think I would have been willing to throw a $ ekstra in to get my hands on earlier

    It should just be very clear that is whats happening, preferably a date for when the price gets dropped/normalized
     
  13. mitrezom

    mitrezom Well-Known Member

    Jan 11, 2009
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    You're assuming that the devs control the "silly game" & that there is a system "to work"... there isn't. trust me.

    2 days after release you're at the bottom of a very large pile with no way to get to the top other than lowering your price.

    Devs don't do it on purpose to scam loyal first adopters. They do it to try and get sales so they can continue supporting the product which in any other market would have sold for 3-10 times the price.

    Don't blame devs for people's cheapness.
     
  14. RM imagery

    RM imagery Well-Known Member

    Jan 12, 2009
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    Long Island, NY
    As said above, the small devs are smart by having an "intro sale" for 3 days or a week and stating their intentions - rewarding the die hards who use sites like this or appsniper:

    "On sale now for .99 but will be $2.99 on Feb. 15th" is great marketing. It could go back to .99 or even free in a month - but who cares? If it's decent, we know to pickk it up now.

    Or be like jakooistra and put a hell of a lot of value and price your game low - and keep it there. I don't think anyone minds the $1.99 price of Blue Attack!

    What really bothers me is the stupid antics of some companies that release at $4.99, then it's $7.99 for a month, and then it's .99. They're setting themselves up for failure.
     
  15. Thechansen

    Thechansen Well-Known Member

    Dec 18, 2008
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    I've noticed something. I'm not sure if it's an app sniper bug or shenanigans, but I'll notice that an app developer will drop the price on his app, wait a bit, then increase and immediately decrease the price back to the already lowered price. I've seen numerous apps appear on recent price drops page of app sniper, multiple times in different time periods. Kind of a way to keep the app on top of the list. Lemme break down how I think it works:

    I want my app that's been out for a month to see an increase in sales so I lower the price from $2.99 to $1.99. I wait a week and pick up a few more downloads. After some time my app disappears from the "Price Drop RSS feed", and as a result my sales slow down. So I increase the price back to $2.99, then lower it again to $1.99, thus insuring my app gets back on the RSS.
     
  16. case

    case Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
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    #16 case, Feb 6, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2009
    obviously it depends on the product here, but what I'm seeing that sux is 'small dev's alienating their users, especially uninformed early, adopters by price slashing within 24hrs of release.

    There are better ways to cultivate a paying community, its more about growing a user base, patience, and communicating with your users than initial sales imo.


    btw mitrezom, i am totally in agreement you. the situation effing sux, but getting caught up in a numbers game centered around the first 24 hours is making things worse. I have already abandoned the app store itself as a primary means of advertisement and connecting up users to your product. Just look at this community, its huge! We all know at the moment the app store is a less than satisfactory means of helping users find your software, but honestly, stop fighting the "pile", I do believe that there are apps out there that have been "burried" but are still consistently making money. The answer in many respects is to involve the community outside of the appstore until the review system allows for more than monolithic/1dimensional reviews.

    Case in point, adding a 'value' dimension to the review system could help ameliorate this problem, but for now I really think fighting the 'pile' with price trickery is far from the best option.
     
  17. case

    case Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
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    Michigan
  18. Donburns99

    Donburns99 Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2008
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  19. PoV

    PoV Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2008
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    London, Ontario, Canada
    #19 PoV, Feb 7, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2009
    Hehe, but what's funny is if we don't change our price all the time like maniacs, we don't get seen. Funny. ;)

    ... :(

    Great clip BTW.
     
  20. davecazz

    davecazz Well-Known Member

    You know, that really sucks if a developer is playing games by increasing their price on purpose for a few minutes hoping that people will click buy from a page showing the lower price. There should be a public hall of shame board for this kind of thing.

    But, keep in mind that accidents can happen and nothing is worst than releasing an app thinking it's a $4.99 app after working for a couple months on it and seeing only 2 people buy you app the next day. I'm sure a lot of people panic and start dropping the price the next day to try and get something out of it. Plus Apple only gives us sales figures each morning, so they would have no choice to wait til the next day to change their price.

    If developers are doing this to game the system, then it really sucks, but that's not always the case. I guess it depends on how many times they are caught in the act.
     

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