When Portal 2 was postponed from late 2010 into 2011, Valve shot out a press release with the subject "VALVE ANNOUNCES MAKING GAMES IS HARD." It was cheeky, sure, but the simple message did its job -- at least, no-one thought the puzzle title was vaporware after it went back into the oven. In hindsight, we wish War Balloon would have done a similar thing once Star Command started to slip. Originally slated to hit in 2011, it saw a lot of delays and a good bit of backlash as a result. You could almost set your watch to a "vaporware" reply coming from someone immediately to any question in the game's thread.

Why did Star Command slip? A lot of reasons, all boiling down to making games is hard. In an effort to seemingly clear the air, War Balloon has commented on the game's delays as well as what it has become since its initial pitch, which was delivered to the world via Kickstarter. The headline grabber in this update is this: Star Command as it is now is 30 percent the game War Balloon wanted it to be.

"First, and foremost, we are VERY proud of Star Command, the update reads. Is it everything we had hoped it would be? Of course not. It's probably 30% of the original vision. Originally, we wanted different eras of ships starting with mankind first heading into space, to a lumbering Ridley Scott-esque commercial fleet to a more peaceful and exploratory Star Trek-like experience. Those were the thoughts of drunk men. We wanted research, a robust diplomatic engine on par with civilization, the ability to capture and torture enemies, and eventually the ability to invade other ships and beam down to planets. So understand that the final product is not near our final vision -- and that is OK."

As we just covered today, Star Command is basically a sci-fi strategy game that focuses on the people, technology, and the rooms of an interstellar starship. You can move your crew around the ship as you fight, assigning them to man rooms as well as put out fires or even blast at aliens that board your ship. It isn't about research or diplomacy. It's about fighting in a hilariously bent galaxy.

War Balloon feels like it got to the core of its idea, though. And for what it's worth, we think it's going to be a pretty good video game. Recruiting new dudes, talking with aliens, and running around your ship are all engaging components of a cohesive, funny, and tough experience that also feels great on touch devices.

Of course, the boiling down of its core ideals means that this isn't exactly the game that normal, everyday people funded (twice). This is what happens with Kickstarter. In the actual execution phase of design and development stuff tends to get tossed or even new stuff gets added. That's the risk, you know?

In lighter news, Star Command is totally (probably) coming out soon. According to this update, the game will be submitted to Apple within the next 24-48 hours. The submission process can take hours or days or up to a week, but it sure seems like a good bet that Star Command will be on the App Store by next Wednesday, ready for purchase at its $2.99 price point. The Android version of the game is said to be coming about a month after. The PC version of the game is coming after that.

New things might be added to Star Command down the line, including some stuff of the stuff that hit the cutting room floor. We'll have to see on that because, you know, video game development is hard and all.

[via PocketGamer]

  • joaquin_ondamoon

    I am pumped for this game, and I'm hoping it's successful enough that they continue to upgrade/expand play. It sounded like an ambitious game from the start - I'm not surprised that they couldn't squeeze everything they wanted in, and still release it in this decade.

    Now cue the screaming/flaming in 5...4...3...

  • Aventador

    It will be fun and that's all that matters to me.Sure, it won't have huge depth of strategy and exploration available, but as space simulator it will definitely stand out.
    From what I've seen from previews, humor is top notch and references to other shows/ movies are all around and that is more than awesome imo.

    • Gabriel.Voyager

      Never played FTL?

      • Aventador

        No

  • JJE McManus

    I like how you snuck in the $2.99 price point. Not a bad deal so long as there isn't any IAP in the way of playing. I'm there for day 1 purchase. Now if WB can just avoid freaking out when people start complaining that it isn't The Most Wonderful Thing Ever we just might have an original IP on iOS that will grow for years. We either support devs what takes chances or we live with endless Temple Run clones. OFAP.

    • jForsythe

      Just watched the vid were IAP were going to be ingame. iap's are the worst thing to happen to games it's ok when the game is free to begin with its like a demo and if you like it buy it from IAP but if this game is 2:99 to begin with then charge you ingame as well that blows. I'll prolly still buy it depends on how much the ingame stuff is having to use tokens to buy stuff ingame is bad Mmmmmm k

  • BaltimoreDave

    Sounds like what made it in was what I was expecting anyways.

  • J. Mark

    Good luck guys! I hope people like your game :)

  • ThisIsAUsername

    So... What happened to the other 70%? Are they planning to expand to include it?

  • Gabriel.Voyager

    30% is not finished... is just 30% of a full game.

    • Skullinton

      It's 30% of what they first envisioned, the other 70% is totally different, not missing...

    • MidianGTX

      What is it about you people that means you can't understand basic logic? Are you just pretending to be stupid as part of a lame troll attempt? The comments on here are pathetic. Grow up.

      • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

        @MidianGTX:disqus - thanks for ranting for me. I appreciate it!!

        Sidenote: All the whining makes me wonder what these people are like to game with? If they die in a game, do they email/call the vidgame company and cry about the controls being sucky?

      • shadowmatt

        These people cannot even understand how producing a game works.

        I bet they get angry when a directors cut of a film comes out as it has extra scenes and they did not get those extra scenes in the price of their original cinema ticket.

      • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

        @shadowmatt:disqus -- you nailed it! That's a great analogy!

        "Damnit, they cut that scene out of the film and put it on the DVD!! Now I have to buy a DVD!! Grrrr!!!"
        HA HA

      • McCREE

        I think you're wrong. I read it that this game is only a fraction of what they hoped to accomplish, not that they incorporated 30% of their vision with 70% 'other stuff'. You should probably relax with all that venom you're spitting and concentrate on what the article is about. Trolling? I only see one.

      • Skullinton

        Ok allow me to rephrase that for you;

        You don't only a third of a game, you get a full fledged game. This game only represent 30% of their initial vision.

      • McCREE

        That reply wasn't directed towards you.

      • Skullinton

        Sorry

      • Skullinton

        On mobile it looked as of yes :p

    • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

      30% of a dream is still more than we would have had if they hadn't worked 2yrs to bring it to us.

    • shadowmatt

      You too are an idiot.

      They incorporated 30% of their initial ideas / brain storming into their final product.

      Thats how the world works. Apple, Microsoft, everyones does it.

      • sandwiches

        Dumbass... They incorporated 30% of the ideas they sold to people on Kickstarter for $200,000.

      • shadowmatt

        Proving again you have no idea how the creative process works.

        The second kick-starter with gameplay video really could not leave you in doubt about where the game was going.

      • shadowmatt

        Oh and to prove you dumb you are.

        The original kick-starter, for the iOS game raised $36,967.

        The second one was to bring the game to the PC and Mac, which is still happening, and that raised $151,806

        For $36,967 you can employ 1 programmer for 1 year if you are lucky and they are cheap. Try to figure out the worth of the game is much more than $36,967.

        You talk like they have somehow scammed everyone.

  • Pete Miller

    If it's 30 percent of the original idea maybe they should only charge $1

    • Skullinton

      Plus 70% of new ideas...

      • sandwiches

        What new ideas?

      • Skullinton

        A full story line? It was never mentioned in the kickstarter...

  • Allen Arcelo

    I'm beginning to get somewhat pissed. 30%, really? I'll it give one more year till I start making fun of you guys.

    • Skullinton

      At least they give you a part of what they promissed not a totally different game...

      • Allen Arcelo

        They technically haven't given me anything yet, obviously.

      • Skullinton

        True, I'll wait until it's out then...

    • MidianGTX

      And you have the right to be pissed because...

      Oh, you don't. Sit there and sulk like a miserable teen.

  • Mandi

    It sounds to me like the original vision was just too broad to work in a game like this. The more streamlined final game certainly sounds good to me... I just hope it's fun!

  • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

    No, 30% of the final product is not okay. It was never okay and will never be okay. The Kickstarter promised a lot and it took money in exchange for those promises, which haven't been fulfilled. $37k for the iOS and $150k for the PC version, 15 months development time, and still - by their own words - only 30% of their vision completed. That's a very bitter pill they're asking people to swallow :|

    Losing the ability to beam to enemy ships, or beam to planet surfaces, is just wrong. A lot was promised and people backed the project on good faith based on that.

    • Skullinton

      You guys are mad cause it take time to deliver something, then when they deliver something you aren't pleased... What will make you happy then?

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        If they delivered what they promised, that would please people. The delays were just ridiculous - the game was claimed to be "finished" in November and the devs said they held it back in order to not get swamped by the Christmas rush on the AppStore. January; Nothing. February; Nothing. March; Nothing. April; Still nothing but looks like it'll show in a week or so --- only this time it's coming with insane feature stripping. It's gone from being this glorious Star Trek simulator to, judging by reviews from all the major mobile outlets, a barebones ship combat arcade game with some minigames. Every conversation ends with three solutions "Let's Fight!", "Let's Fight!" and "Let's Fight!"

        How can you not understand why people are not screaming with joy? You claimed it's not a "totally different game" - well it's certainly not matching the claims of the TWO successful Kickstarters they ran. By the developer's own words, they only managed to attain roughly 30% of their vision - and since their vision was the Kickstarter, that's an awful lot of stripped content. You can see the difference between the gameplay vids from OCTOBER 2012 to the ones released yesterday. What happened to that content in the meantime?

      • Skullinton

        They say that the final product is 30% of their original vision, but that doesn't mean that you'll get only 30% of a game...

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        Okay then, can you please exemplify what that changed 70% comprises of? I haven't actually seen anything in the 20 minute GP vid from yesterday, or the half-dozen previews from various sites, that would account for the changes --- except removals. Removal counts as change too.

      • Skullinton

        What I mean is that you wont get only 30% of a game, you get a full game. It'll sure be nice to see these oter features added in future updates, but i'll surely be happy to play this game as it is.

        Also, I did see the TA plays and I flew over the october one and I don't see much difference...

      • Skullinton

        By this i mean they don't seem to have removed anything in the game but instead on the drawing board.

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        Well we'll just have to agree to disagree on the terminology, because while it may be a "full game" it only has 30% of the promised content. So it's a full game with 70% less fat; this should be sold as Star Command Lite ^_^

      • Skullinton

        LoL alright, lets just hope they add more content in future updates :P

      • Markedcards

        So how much did YOU give to the kickstarter that makes you feel so cheated?

      • Skullinton

        Nothing, but I supported cancer research and didn't get a cure... Should I be dissapointed?

      • Skullinton

        This is a metaphor btw...

      • lavenders2

        Skullinton I think your missing the crucial part here: people are not getting everything that was advertised after paying for it.

        I understand that I am getting a full complete product. What I don't like is how most of that product isn't what I payed for. Diplomacy was a promised feature, it never happened. Eras was a promised feature, it never happened. If that doesn't happen, then what did I pay for exactly? Some random features that I don't care about.

        I just went and bought a packet of Doritos. Why should I fear that more than half of the packet is going to have sandwiches in it instead?

        This is borderline false advertising, which in some countries is ILLEGAL! It is only saved because it is a Kickstarter project, where the advertised features couldn't be confirmed and as such, may not be implemented in the final product, which clearly exists.

        Will I get refunds or grab my pitchfork? No, but you can bet that unless WarBallon starts to prove that they can deliver, I will give my money to someone I know who can.

      • Skullinton

        I understand what you mean but there is two things that I must point out;

        First, you did not buy anything by supporting this kickstarter, nor did you invest, you merely supported it, gave a donation. In this case, you are not entitled to say that this game is a fraud or that it was falsely advertise.

        Second, nowhere in the kickstarter terms of agreement it is mentionned that all the goals must be met. The dev putted these as guidelines, goals, not promises, but these are drawingboard ideas and as stated many time by others and me, a game dev process is long and uneasy, it is often proned to changes. They said it themselves, many of these ideas were drunk men thoughts.

        I'd also like to point out that maybe they didn't manage to put all their goals in the game, but instead of implementing, for instance, the free roam model they focused on a more linear story. A more linear story also means that the result of diplomacy must always (or often) be the same...

        All in all, I understand your deception, but I do not believe that all the bad hype is justified since the dev did respect many of their goals. I do hope that they implement the "promised" features in future updates, though, since they plan to put them on pc.

      • airwa1k

        Well said. The kickstarter trap has snagged a lot of people. Research where you are putting your money.

      • Skullinton

        I wouldn't call kickstarter a trap (that is something I'd rather not debate about), but people must definatly be more informed on where they put their money...

      • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

        @toucharcade-d77c508da15597f6a6419e176ba8b11e:disqus - I suggest you abstain from Kickstarter, buddy. It ain't Doritos, it's visionaries talking about inventing Doritos before they've ever once been tasted -- and you thought they'd taste like flowers, but they thought the cheesy taste was more important.

        (Meanwhile, Doritos are like 100% chemistry + corn meal, ie a very unnatural unhealthy unfood.)

      • lavenders2

        I live in Australia and can't use Amazon, and therefore haven't invested a cent into a Kickstarter project (even though it sounds like I may have). My main disappointment mostly comes from me really looking forward to this game, and slowly losing interest until now, where I am now questioning whether my ITunes gift card I saved for this game should be spent on another game. I will wait for more info and a review or two.

        To clear something up, I never said what WarBalloon did is illegal, or even close to it. I said it was close to false advertising, but as I said, it wasn't because it was Kickstarter and you obviously can't make an objective claim on something that doesn't exist yet.

        What makes this game a bit of a disaster right now is that this game had a lot of stuff going for it. Then the game started to get delayed. Then it was later revealed through Facebook that around 13-14 months after the first promised date that their product was no longer crashing. I think it is a bit too far when you delay your game for over a year and then announce that your product is stable and actually functions. Finally it now all makes sense, because the game is missing some of its original ideas.

        Want to know another game that went through this? Empire of the Eclipse. That game now has 2 people active on the forums, one which is a dev (it has a few more players though). It was delayed, the beta showed that it failed to deliver on some aspects, game is now so dead and released with so many problems that they gave away 6 months of free game time (it is a subscription based game, 6 months is about $12)

        It all winds up to my final statement: If WarBalloon don't deliver on what they promised, then I will turn to someone who will deliver (perhaps the guys who made FTL?)

      • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

        @toucharcade-d77c508da15597f6a6419e176ba8b11e:disqus -- I don't think it's wise to call this game "a disaster" before it's released. It'll probably be a huge hit.
        But I will agree to one point you made -- they screwed up when discussing the timelines. That's b/c they are new game devs. Pro devs / marketers / PR people have learned the correct answer, which is (if they hope to release in 2014) "we are working on a 2015 release date but have no specific date set" or worse, the "we have no release date set yet".

        Thanks for admitting you didn't Kickstart and have nothing invested in the game except eager anticipation and a hopeful iTunes card. Since the game will be only $3, I bet you will buy it regardless -- b/c it's going to be fun!!! Will you take my bet on that?

      • http://iqsoup.com/ iqSoup

        The people you "KNOW" can deliver don't need your money and probably won't be asking for it on Kickstarter. Someone like that has a proven track record, which means they already have lots of money or at the very least enough clout to get real investments (not the $5 variety) from VCs and such.

        The whole premise of Kickstarter is to kick start a project--a project that otherwise would be unlikely to succeed. In the case of games this means your going to have mostly unproven devs out there asking for your help. Its ya our choice to help them or not--but don't be so naive to think that the game will end up perfectly and exactly how and when you want it. I'm 100% sure these devs gave this game their all. I know how it is and I can tell you these guys worked longer and harder on this thing than they ever could have imagined. Releasing late is a much bigger bummer to them than it is to you--trust me. It means they had to wait all those extra months to get paid. Game development is hard and its impossible to judge perfectly how long it will take and exactly what the finished project is going to look like.

        Its obviously a work of love and they did their very best--so maybe scale back the whining a tad. I for one am impressed that they had the creativity and ambition to even pursue such an undertaking--and much more so for actually completing what looks to me to be a pretty awesome game.

        Apparently you didn't realize the risks when you funded the project but you should have been smarter. If you feel so burned then next time try to be less naive. Also steer clear of a future career in business.

      • sandwiches

        I would be disappointed if i had been promised a cure by a specific date.

      • Skullinton

        But you understand that the development of a cure is a long and tedious project. Also many unexpected events can change the progression.
        Right?

      • sandwiches

        Right. Which is why no one in their right minds would ever promise a cure by a specific date.

        Seems like the StarCommand devs could've used that lesson.

      • http://iqsoup.com/ iqSoup

        I was going to ask the same thing! Did you give them like $1,000 or something???

      • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

        @sabin figaro - Should we ask how much $$$ you put in their kickstarter to have so much anger at a revolutionary new game being put on the market?

      • shadowmatt

        You are an idiot to be truthful.

        Have you ever developed anything of worth? If so you would know that during that development period things are added and things are taken away. Read the nintendo / star fox interview recently where the devs were kept being told by miyamoto to keep removing their ideas and to keep it slim so the game would work and be playable.

        The game still looks on par with the previous teaser videos and it generally looks like it did then.

        When films are made they cut down the screenplay / book, then whole sections of the films are dropped / cut etc... people who acted may not actually make it into the final cut. This is done to deliver a complete and concise film rather than just delivering everything as you seem to expect.

        It was a kick starter, they showed and engine and described what they would like to see in the final game. Sure some stuff did not happen but other stuff would have, which you wont notice as its there rather than missing.

      • sandwiches

        Correction: Most stuff didn't happen. The game isn't anywhere close to what they were selling on either Kickstarter. But hey... I understand your need to make up excuses for them. It's human nature to try to justify and rationalize our decisions, even when they are clearly bad ones.

      • Skullinton

        It's also part of human nature to exagerate when something displease them...

      • blondellebisho

        my friend's sister-in-law makes $74 every hour on the laptop. She has been out of a job for 6 months but last month her income was $21055 just working on the laptop for a few hours. Read more on  Jive8.c­om

      • captainugboots

        Does her work involve a webcam?

      • foxserge

        For that income in a month your "friend's sister in law" would have had to be working for 9.48423423 hours every day 7 days a week for a 30 day month. How is that "just a few hours" oh forum spamming robot.

      • MidianGTX

        How can you downvote this? It's sound logic. Some people need a slap in the face, they clearly don't know up from down.

      • MidianGTX

        PM me on the forum, Mr. Downvoter. I have urgent news regarding your immediate family.

      • dariusjr98

        You can be a real ass sometimes.

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        He's always an ass. You should read his forum posts, nothing but trolling and whining at people that don't follow him like sheep -- oh and threats of violence, wonderful combination; hostile and intolerant. He seems to be a pet of the mods though, which is why he's allowed to be that way.

        Pity.

    • Pietrole

      This is what happens when the Kickstarter business model is marketed towards inexperienced "investors".

      You did not purchase a pre-packaged, completed product. You did not even "angel-invest" the final product, such that you have any interest in the ongoing wellbeing of Warballoon or the product once it is ready to launch and profits are realised.

      What you did was akin to throwing coins into construction of a well, knowing not how deep nor how much water you would one day be able to draw from it.

      You "invested" in that proverbial well because, at the time, the idea of a well was attractive and the builders/developers appeared to have the requisite talents to deliver it. There was also no one else (in your mind) better capable of delivering such a well. Which is why you "invested" with them in the first place.

      Now perch upon my knee, gaming community, and lend me your ear. As an investor -- just as you would if you were an investor in any other business-- you assume a great deal of risk. That risk is yours and yours alone to bear. It's the nature of funding and because you're doing that funding shoulder to shoulder with squillions of other "investors", your rights to the final product are just as diminished.

      Essentially you're a shareholder, with shares only equal in value to whatever the final product may be. Even worse, you're a shareholder with no voting rights, nor rights to sell or trade your shares. And you knew and agreed to this up front when you funded it, it's the nature of Kickstarter, the great unwashed and imperfect marketplace.

      Now here's the hard part: none of this is Warballoon's fault. They, like any other upstart, have to find their funding from somewhere. And they, like any other upstart, have risks and overheads all of their own, not the least of which is their inexperience in development and management. Oh, you didn't know they were inexperienced?

      That's your problem, you should have done your homework, your "due diligence" so to speak, which is the backbone of any investment.

      So really, count yourselves lucky that there is even a final product just around the corner. Because for every successful investment out there, there are probably another 100 (no exaggeration) that have failed miserably and the investors have had nothing to show for their capital injection, not even a $2.99 iOS game.

      It's called a business write-off and it's part and parcel of capitalism and the private investment world, it's very own form of darwinism.

      It's part of your world now too, gaming community, because you just keep Kickstarting.

      • Pietrole

        Please keep in mind when reading the above, I fully sympathise with those of you whose expectations haven't been met. I really do. You have a right to -feel- disappointed.

        But while you may -feel- disappointment, you do not have a right to be vindictive because your expectations were not met. Your expectations were unqualified where they should have been considered together with the risk you were assuming.

        It really sucks, but one can hardly blame Warballoon for needing to crawl before they could walk before they could run. It's why Kickstarter exists, because these smaller upstarts would never be funded by traditional channels.

      • captainugboots

        Don't water it down dude. I think your first post said everything it needed to say.

        Absolutely perfect.

      • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

        @toucharcade-ed4cfef3d1aee41c64dfd4766d8614e5:disqus -- but don't you think that post says more about the poster than Warballoon or the game?

      • troyster

        According to a lot of these posts, if you feel disappointed then automatically you're a "whiner" or a "hater" because making games is hard.

      • dariusjr98

        That because MedianGTX is just floating around the comments to spit at the next person that "whines." He may be well known around these parts, but he can be a real ass.

      • http://iqsoup.com/ iqSoup

        Well said!

    • oz9

      It's common in game development that a fraction of the features from the original vision document never end up in the final game's release. This is a basic notion any kickstarter backer should know.

      It's not even simply a matter of including everything from the original vision. Features that may sound brilliant on paper, can become problematic or simply not work well in execution. Getting everything to coalesce well may also demand desired features hit the cutting room floor, like any art. I'm not surprised at the exclusion of research that you indicate and their team was too small to meet the ambitions of off-ship exploration off the bat.

      It seems they made the right decision to concentrate and polish the core mechanics instead. With a solid foundation, they can and have indicated they will expand beginning with the PC version.

    • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

      @Sabin -- I kickstarted it, and I'm not disappointed. I 100% disagree w/you about the product not being ok.
      BUT
      I think they made a huge mistake (and they know it) by informing people of dates which they wouldn't make -- b/c they were new game dev's.
      I've done project mgmt for years & realized early on, "uh oh, that's pretty soon." What they should have told those who demanded a date is very simple -- either you grossly over-estimate time needed (ie end of 2014 ) and then say "surprise! we made it way faster", or you do not offer a release date but rather status updates ONLY.
      Therefore, I do not judge them for the delayed release, nor do I whine about them "promising and taking money" b/c I chose to give them money to fund their project. They didn't force me to pay them. Did they force you?

      • shadowmatt

        You tend to find with large projects is that you cannot accurately predict their completion. Its all just guess work which relies on everything working 100% and no suppliers messing up.

        They estimated a date and missed it. To me that says they had to work longer than expected, which really means you are getting more man hours of work for your money.

      • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

        There are ways of getting much better estimates for project length but when you start something you don't have very much experience within a small team it's VERY hard to gauge.

    • http://twitter.com/ModernJack1 JackModern

      yep,another of your disinformation comments, while it's true it's they massed up the the developing,and not making the full game they wanted to make,,there is HUGE differents between vision and promise,which you can see in their kickstarter page they didn't promise all of that. ,lots of games are far from 100% of visions,by your logic, you can bash almost every game,it's fact that addtional content that couldn't be in the game, is making the way in,that's way you see that lots of "the vision" didn't make up to the final product,and might be afterwards.

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        Please stop responding to my comments, Jack. It's clear you have nothing but hatred and vitriol towards me, everything with you is based on an agenda - you're a bully, quite simply, stalking and bullying those that you don't agree with.

        I have explained my position, clearly and succinctly, many times in this discussion about Star Command - and here you come riding in, five days later, trying to dredge up more drama like you do all the time. I've made my points clear about SC, I have nothing further to add. If you're happy Warballoon took $200k and failed to deliver on a lot of their promises, that's completely fine, I'm not happy and that should be fine too. Do what you constantly tell others to do; ignore me. Or are you a hypocrite as well?

  • Lazy_Ekans

    Yo, there thousands of 0.99 cent apps, you don't have to worry about apps becoming expensive. If $2.99 is too much for you can go play an ad supported Angry Birds derivative or match some brightly colored jewels for free.

    • Skullinton

      The thing is that most of the haters are people that were expecting more, that don't understand that a developpement process is a long and tedious path and because of this game are prone to changes...

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        70% change is not acceptable, not when money changed hands *in advance* -- I feel you're glossing over that point and it's unfair to do so. To those buying now, they have the chance and the fairness of seeing a product available AS IS and then they can make their choice with foresight and knowledge. To those that backed the (successful!) iOS Kickstarter and those that backed the (insanely successful, 4-5x more income!) PC Kickstarter, they're receiving a product that is drastically (70% difference counts as drastic in anyone's lexicon) different from one they were expecting.

        You use the word "expectation" like a curse, like it's everyone else's fault Warballoon failed to meet their vision. Try stepping down and seeing things from someone else's point of view, please :)

      • Skullinton

        But at least they delivered something, they didnt leave you hanging... Which is something they could have done.

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        That's true, you certainly won't get an argument out of me on that one. At least it's coming - and I'll be waiting on the PC version since that one is, by the dev's own admission, going to be the primary platform for pushing new content. Hopefully planetary landings, enemy invasions, diplomacy, research and more open-ended gameplay ideas get implemented on there and then ported back to iOS.

      • troyster

        That makes everything else ok then I guess

      • Skullinton

        I understand that you might be mad, but you don't seem to be taking into account that a dev process is hard ans long, two factors that often lead to changes in games....

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        I'm not mad, disappointed maybe, but not mad. However, you're simply not taking into consideration that a 70% change from what was promised in two successful Kickstarters is entirely unacceptable. People funded the development of a product that has, for all intents and purposes, turned out significantly different than advertised.

        Anyhow, I've said my part and there's nothing left to do except go over already-trodden ground. I hope the game is enjoyable and I hope the devs can reimplement a lot of what was promised, so I'm done for now :)

      • Skullinton

        Agreed

  • september

    The second this shows up on the store is the second I hit buy, there's not many offerings like this and there's definitely nothing I've come across that's not freemium.

    Good news.

    • Gabriel.Voyager

      Wow, the only positive thing of SC is that is not freemium? Ok, good ;)

  • Appvism

    This game has taken forever but i hope it'll be good, if so i'll most likely buy it. Its taken so long that i don't really care when its released now - i have many more other games to play in the meantime!

  • otakuzod

    To quote Megatron: I'd have waited an ETERNITY for this!

  • Skullinton

    I wanted to add this quote from the article;

    "Of course, the boiling down of its core ideals means that this isn't exactly the game that normal, everyday people funded (twice). This is what happens with Kickstarter. In the actual execution phase of design and development stuff tends to get tossed or even new stuff gets added. That's the risk, you know?"

    • thiefwriter

      We read the article.

      • Skullinton

        But people still don't understand...

  • curtneedsaride

    If I had backed this on Kickstarter, and they release it with a lot of promised content missing... I'd be disappointed too. I understand that 30% of their original vision doesn't necessarily mean that this is only 30% of what was promised on Kickstarter. I didn't back it. BUT, I was excited once I finally read about it. So excited that I decided I'd want to buy it if it ever came out.

    And now that it is almost here... again... I am now a little disappointed to hear that it isn't more of a sandbox with missions. Once all the missions are accomplished, is there anything left to do? Can you still fly around, trade, fight, level up, etc? If not, then I'll be bummed. But I'll still give it a go, and hope updates aren't as hard to code as this first version was.

    • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

      That's exactly it, too. The 30 percent thing isn't about what was promised. That stuff he listed off in the quote was pie-in-the-sky and never mentioned as a goal in the kickstarter. I also thought it would be a little more "open" exploration, but I'm not sure that will be a problem, yet.

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        Don't even think of playing the "none of this was promised card" because it most certainly was. Go and check the original Kickstarter and see, quite clearly as bullet-point feature list;

        RESEARCH, EXPLORE DERELICT SHIPS and DIPLOMACY.

        Neither of which are in the final product. It's not even a turn-based game any longer, but a real-time one. There are no "diplomatic visitors" so the claim of constructing non-combat rooms is also false.

      • Skullinton

        Might I add that they said that they plan to imply these features on the PC version (in one of their last kickstarter post). I will also point out that it's their PC kickstarter that made more cash. So in a way it makes sense that they use the ressources they got for pc on the pc version.

        Also, maybe just maybe, the release of this game will help fund futur development (just speculating here).

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

        A lot of the issue here is internet whiners who skim what was actually said, lock onto the 30% comment, and immediately go thermonuclear. If they were actual backers and read the update, they'd know that the devs are planning on putting more features into the PC version and then back update the iOS release once the extra features are polished and ready. First on that list is a sandbox mode to roam the galaxy outside the story mode. They still want to get in some of those features that didn't make it, but it's going to take a while and people have been absolutely screaming at them to release the iOS version for months. This is really the best compromise; release the polished story campaign now, which will also help with additional funding, and then use the PC beta to develop additional content that can come to the iOS version in future app updates. I suspect if they had really tried to make everything they originally dreamed work in the game before releasing, it would have ended up being Duke Nukem Forever all over again.

      • Skullinton

        Exactly what I think. All the current information you just pointed out regarding the game is actually in the full post quoted in this article... It's sad to see that many of these devoted backers didn't take the time to check it out.

      • Skullinton

        When you support cancer research, you're not buying a cancer cure, but you help the development of it... Shouldn't it be the same for supporting a dev via kickstarter?

      • http://www.NFOhump.com/ Sabin Figaro

        No, because cancer research isn't promising Product X with Features Y. Kickstarter projects specifically do. Please don't try to apply broken analogies.

      • Skullinton

        This analogy is not broken, you didn't pay for that game, same goes for the cure, you supported it, so the results you get might not be the one foretold... Also, there is not statement on the kickstarter website that the developper must fully honnor their goals.

      • joaquin_ondamoon

        I think they never should have used the whole '30%' analogy: now you're just giving people a reason to shout 'where's the other 70%??!!'
        I would have stated simply that we implemented as much if our original vision as we could, we wanted to get the core game out the door in a non-buggy playable state, and we hope to implement more features in the near future.
        I like these guys, and appreciate their intentions to communicate as much as possible to the public. But they should think through some of the stuff they say. Once they say '30%', anything else they had to say gets lost in the sea of pitchforks and torches.

      • Skullinton

        You have a point there, but the thing is people take it in a too litterary way. What they probably ment is that they didn't cut stuff from the game to give us a stripped version of it, instead they took another direction and now 30% of their initial idea is in it and 70% is new stuff.

      • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

        The only item promised in the original Kickstarter that I remember and that also shows up in his post in the above article is "research" the other stuff was what they hoped they could pull off but I don't remember it even being mentioned: different eras of space travel? My only point was that the 30% of the vision includes many things that were never promised.

        You obviously thought backing meant something different than what is intended and you feel betrayed. I can understand that.

        As far as I can tell these guys worked their tails off for two years and are fulfilling their promise and dream to make a cool and unique mobile game. They were upfront about changes being made as they went and any good project is going to change as realities of what is fun and attainable supercede any dreams and visions.

        Unfortunately for anyone thinking they were buying a product that was only in the planning stages and wanted it to come out exactly how they thought it would, the entire gratification of participating in supporting a cool project and helping people achieve something they couldn't without you is completely lost.

      • sandwiches

        Bottom line: They didn't deliver what most people thought they were backing. Period.

        Spare us all the logical acrobatics, word games, and weak rationalizations.

      • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

        Bottom(er) line: Some people feel slighted or wronged and some people don't.

        I haven't played it yet. I'm curious where your "most people" assumption comes from, especially since most people who backed it ALSO haven't played it.

        Anyone following the the kickstarter had a pretty good idea of how the project was coming along. At least a few vocal people are certainly angry.

        I was backing a small team of programmers making a mobile sci-fi Star Trekkie game with ship/crew management, strategy elements and plenty of humor. As far as I can tell from previews, I'll be getting exactly that.

        If there are any logical acrobatics or rationalizing going on it's at least equally coming from the side who can't explain their great emotional distress and anger from a ~$20 backing that went sideways on them.

      • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

        Well, you must be right. You said, "period." I do wonder where your data on what "most people" thought comes from.

        I got what I thought I was backing, I was glad to help, and it's pretty awesome. Can't wait to see what they do with it from now on and what they do next.

        My experience is just anecdotal though. Not like your data source.

        Sarcasm aside, when did discussing specifics of understanding become "logical acrobatics and word games"? We can't discuss anything unless it's knee-jerk emotional or simplified? No room for nuance?

      • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

        My point is that some of the stuff he is including in the 100% was never mentionied in the Kickstarter like: "Originally, we wanted different eras of ships starting with mankind first heading into space, to a lumbering Ridley Scott-esque commercial fleet to a more peaceful and exploratory Star Trek-like experience. Those were the thoughts of drunk men." While you are right about those two items, the quote also mentions: "the ability to capture and torture enemies, and eventually the ability to invade other ships and beam down to planets." other things that I don't remember being promised.

        My point is that he is coming up with that 30% number in relation to everything promised plus the "thoughts of drunk men" not 30% of what they promised.

        They overestimated their own abilities shot high and still came up with something pretty great. I guess they should have been more careful about how he phrased this statement which I think was SUPPOSED to be sort of a pre-emptive damage control, but that 30% number is all some people see.

        They made mistakes, but worked their butts off and delivered. I find it hard to be mad about that.

    • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

      Their first update (they said) is to make sandbox functionality. So buy it -- yes, support the producers and help make something (w/o really doing anything) and you can reap the benefits ... eventually.

  • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

    Can't wait to play.

    As someone who is currently developing a game and has another that has languished in development for half a decade I completely relate to these guys. Just like many of you imagine that making a game is easier and less time consuming than it is, those who develop games (even those that do it for an actual living as full-time jobs) can't meet target deadlines or hack a game to pieces just to release it on time. 3 guys is an insanely small team (as a team of one most of the time I wouldn't mind, though).

    The Kickstarter was a good one, the game seems to be a good one. I think people's frustration comes from simply not understanding what they are paying for when they give to a Kickstarter. They think it's a way to buy a product. It's not. You are supporting a project. It's that simple. And I did back it, btw. Twice.

    • Skullinton

      That's what I wanted to say all along :P

  • NeonGreenKermit

    To think I nearly help fund it... would have been mighty pissed right now, completely understand the rage. It's symptomatic of the worst excesses of crowd-sourced funding - a bunch of amateurs with only a dream and a bag of chips invent a budget, timescale, and promise the world on a stick... which is exactly why I didn't fund it, not because I'm stingy. I hope it works out for them, but it's a lesson about investing.

    • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

      Kickstarters aren't investments, though. It's about giving a project and those behind it a chance that they wouldn't normally get. It's inherently risky, that's the point and the attraction. I think Kickstarter's popularity has ballooned faster than people's capacity to understand it. Which is a shame because it's such a great development.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

        This exactly. And what a lot of people don't realize is what exactly these devs on Kickstarter are accountable for. Kickstarter only enforces that the project provide the explicit reward tiers presented during the project. If the project changes directions halfway through development, nothing is stopping it from happening as long as they send out the promised swag. You're backing the idea of the project, and ideas frequently have to be modified in order to be brought into reality.

        If they want to gather support again, there's personal incentive to do a good job, but nothing is guaranteed to you; that is both the strength and weakness of Kickstarter. Devs aren't tied down to the whims of a publisher and can for the most part change what needs to be done to make a good game, but you as a backer risk delays or not getting exactly what you were expecting up front, particularly in the case of game development. Personally, I think that's worth the risk, but then I don't see $20 as something to rage over going to waste if the worst case scenarios happen.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Will-Buckingham/518019273 Will Buckingham

        I think it's hilarious how many people downvoted me for pointing out Kickstarter's ACTUAL business model. You might not like it, and you might think you deserve more from projects you back, but the reality is exactly what I posted. It doesn't matter how late or how much they change the concept before delivering, as long as they deliver something that fits the description in the REWARD TIER, they have fulfilled their end of the Kickstarter agreement. If it doesn't end up being what was pitched at the beginning of the campaign, then you're the sucker for pledging more than you were ready to lose should things go south. Reality folks; sometimes it sucks, but all the down votes in the world won't help you escape it.

      • NeonGreenKermit

        Of course it's an investment! Here, let me Google that for you:

        in·vest·ment
        /inˈves(t)mənt/
        Noun
        The action or process of investing money for profit or material result.
        A thing that is worth buying because it may be profitable or useful in the future.

        'Material result'

        'Useful in the future'

        Any crowd source venture is about investing in people in good faith that they will deliver. Hence incentives on return. Otherwise, it'd be a charity!

        Please, think about what you're typing before fingers touch keyboard.

      • http://buzzabit.com/aaron/ Aaron Sullivan

        Yeah, I was a bit loose with my phraseology there. We're getting pretty specific here, too, so I can't even really accuse you of pedantry. ;oP

        Really, I mean that it's not primarily an investment opportunity. Especially not in the way I think people usually imagine investments as in material GAIN. You won't get more money or "material" than you pay in, for instance.

        It's also not (always) a charity. There IS a give and take.

        It's primarily for kick starting, though.

      • NeonGreenKermit

        Agreed, though it is certainly marketed as the Amazon of project ideas. You can't blame the general public for taking it this way, it's much more the fault of project designers taking advantage of hype, where they need to be much clearer about the possibility of total failure, delays etc... but who would say that and still expect backing? I think there are a lot of great projects on there, some rotten eggs, and a lot like Star Command where the vision simply exceeds reality. It's kinda up to the devs to know their limits, I think, it's not like they promised to cure cancer.

  • sleb

    It looks like it is going to be a good game. I have been following this game for years and am glad it is coming out soon. Let's not pass any judgement til you play the game.

  • Bloodangel

    I'm looking forward to this game... Bit disappointed in it only having 30% of content tho.

    I think people feel conned. They paid money into an idea and in the end only got 30% of what they paid for. Some even say they should give 70% of the money back to people.

    They could at least state if game will get added content in future... Then this will ease the pain on those that paid money into this and was let down at last minute.
    I also expect after having waited so long and been told its almost completed... To then be told they only getting 30% of the original content/ideas.... Had got people mad!

    • shadowmatt

      Fool as well.

      Its not content thats missing, or levels. They had initial ideas and incorporated the ones they could ( and could make work ) into a final product.

  • Ryan Bach

    I can absolutely understand why some Kickstarter backers are upset now. They're not getting anything close to the game they were pitched, and that sucks. It's part of the risk of backing a Kickstarter, but that doesn't make it suck less for the people who feel let down by the devs.

    That said, the game they did complete sounds like a different take on FTL-esque gameplay. If they executed that 30% well, it still sounds like a good iOS game for 3 bucks. As someone who didn't back the Kickstarter(s), and had pretty much written the game off as vaporware, this is better news than I expected. It sounds like there will be a game called Star Command that I can actually play, and it sounds like it might be a pretty fun game.

    • Skullinton

      You miss the whole 30% point... It not about giving you 30% of the content, it about giving you 100% of a game that is 30% of what they first envisionned. In other words it's not a third of a game...

      • Karzay

        lol, what? 100% of 30%. It's 30% of what they promised.

      • Skullinton

        Let me rephrase that (my bad);

        The game is not a thord of a game, it's a full game, but they couldn't imply everything. In the end only 30% of their original idea was implemented (which doesn't mean that it's the only content in it) and it has been polished as a full fledged game.

      • Karzay

        I get that. I think a lot of people do. What everyone is upset about is the 70% of content they were promised and expecting, but will be missing out on.

      • Skullinton

        True but that is the magic of the appStore ans the updates, many of the great game were forged over multiple months of them. And as i said above, they plan on implementing these cut out features on pc, we might also get them at one point or another, we never know...

      • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

        @Karzay:disqus - eh? It's not 30% of what they promised, it's 30% (in their words) of what they hoped to do. But the game is made, so that game is 100% of what was kickstarted.
        People whining about missing bits will have to wait longer.
        Oh no! Waiting!!!
        Now we understand why Hollywood doesn't mention Avengers 2 is coming in 2014 -- until the film is 99.6% done. And they've got tons of proj mgrs on the film AND know the exact release date already...!

      • Karzay

        Are you part of the production team? How do you know what they hoped for isn't the same as what they promised and if it isn't, why be foolish enough to put that into a percentage? It sounds like you are just blindly defending them and not from a position of knowledge.

      • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

        Eh? You could say I'm blindly supporting them, I suppose, but I kickstarted & have been eyeballing, plus I had a couple exchanges with the devs.
        You just don't understand Kickstarter -- you pay for someone to make something. There's no PROMISE, but there are goals.
        The investor HOPES to get a final deliverable that matches the description.
        But whatever -- please, keep on whining about what's missing.
        But don't buy it -- it's only 30% of what they were hoping to make.

      • Karzay

        You are a very understanding person. When they explain what the game will be, I expect them to deliver on that when I support them. To me, that is a promise. If they had said they only hoped to find a way to add features, I wouldn't have supported them.

        I wasn't given the impression that creating this game was an experiment. I assumed they knew what they were doing and the game would be exactly what they said it would be.

      • shadowmatt

        How. Did they show working graphics and the engine doing these things that, while were initial ideas, were cut from production.

        How can you miss something that never existed?

        Its up to them to decide when the game is complete.

      • Karzay

        I'm talking about features they promised on kickstarter like away missions and other things. People supported them because they thought they would delivery on their promises. It has nothing to do with what actually existed at the time they made promises.

      • Skullinton

        BTW replied to the wrong user, was supposed to be Bloodangel...

  • joaquin_ondamoon

    I think people are way too focused on the whole percentage thing. The playthrough looks good, and they seem to have built a solid core game, with plenty of room for expansion. Although I didn't contribute to this on Kickstarter, I have been following it in anticipation of it's release. It's an instabuy for me on release day, and I'll be supporting them in the future.

    I have contributed to other Kickstarter projects (notably Wasteland 2 and Shadowrun Returns), because I have faith in those developers to produce a game that will be good, and that I will enjoy. Also, without Kickstarter most of these types of games would never see the light of day with a AAA publisher. So I'm just happy this game is being created, and I'm gonna support WB so they can make more cool games and hopefully add more content to this one in the future. To me, that's what KS is about. You're not 'buying' a game, you're making an investment in one in the hopes that a game (or book, film, etc) will get made. If you want to know exactly what features will be implemented, wait 'til it's finished, and then purchase it. Just MHO.

  • Regulus

    Too many people here pretending they know what it's like to develop a game. It really is very very hard, and things change, always. You can have the best plan in the world for the most awesome game with great ideas, but chances are some of those ideas or features will not work when implemented, they may be boring. They may just not feel right in the game flow, or a thousand other reasons. So you do what any game dev does, you change things until they do work, and fit in your scope and then polish, polish, polish. And that children is how games are made.

    • Skullinton

      I feel enlighten... O.O

    • Skullinton

      I feel enlighten... O.O

    • NeonGreenKermit

      The people upset by this aren't games designers, they're gamers. They gave the devs money in good faith they knew what they were doing and could hit targets. It's their job, right? A short delay is forgivable, but almost a year and the 'making games are hard' line? My point: if you're in the business of games dev, dev the game. Don't cry like a whining little girl because 'its hard', you'd be eaten up and spat out in any other industry, never to work again. People don't care what challenges you face, they care about good business relationships. It's not about them feels.

      The devs did nothing for themselves by not communicating. I imagine there were days they locked themselves in the toilet and panic sobbed, head in hands, eyes red raw and bulging. But again, no one actually gives a shoot about that, and rightfully so.

      • Skullinton

        Well people should care about the game dev, because if we don't the quality of the game they give won't be as good.

        Also, gamer should stop being so self centric about their little needs on how a game should be out now but not incomplete and especially not have iAp and be .99$... It's hard to make a game that meets everyones expectation, I'm not a dev and I understand that.

      • NeonGreenKermit

        I actually agree 100%, but in a capitalist world, this is simply how it is.

      • Regulus

        You imagine them in the toilet sobbing, but thats only you imagining. Yet you are here in reality whining and crying "it's not what we wanted". Could the devs have been more transparent? Absolutely. But that doesn't mean they've made a bad game. The biggest mistake they've made is saying "it's only 30% of the original ideas" that was a dumb move because dumb people are going to misinterperete that to meaning it's only 30% of a game, or 30% of the content planned.

        Now as a secondary point, gameplay features don't make a game. A solid polished game makes it a good game This can be seen by games like superbrothers S&S. The features of that are what? Slowed paced walking and non modern graphics! Wow what a feature list. Yet it is praised as an ios masterpiece. The problem is the gamers here who feel entitled, regardless of wether the game is good without the features or not. Not the devs.

  • Phil_Lapineau

    The missing 70% was already done by Subset Games (FTL).

  • http://rekzkarz.com/ REkzkaRZ

    Again, props to Warballoon! I'm super-psyched that I kickstarted this AND will be happy to play!
    NOTE: I've also kickstarted a few other games that aren't released yet. My joy is b/c I helped (just by spending a few $$$) something to get made that corporations wouldn't take a chance on! YAY
    For all the folks moaning about this and that, or your 30% of the game soundbite -- please go find a game on IOS that is comparable & play that.
    Kickstarter is a tool to back makers to make THEIR VISION of something, not YOUR VISION.
    Wanna see your vision get made? Go start a kickstarter, fundraise, and do the work!!! HA!!!

  • NeonGreenKermit

    Here's a better idea: do what the guys at Project Zomboid do. There's a demo, and a paid demo. Open communication, forum, bouncing ideas, developing a community. Be honest about set backs like break-ins, data loss, post info about overcoming them. Let the community help.

    Here's what not to do: make grand statements about everything you are going to do, given the right amount of money, then take that money up front. High fives, order Dominos Pizza. Hide away for a year without meaningful communication, slowly dawning in terrifying realisation that Making Games Is Hard, keep saying it'll be released next month. Finally admit you bit off more than you could ever chew, throw out the immortal line Making Games Is Hard hoping everyone just hugs each other and forgets about the extraordinary amount of money you've had up front to deliver a project you can shamelessly proclaim will only vaguely resemble the pitch idea to the tune of 30% (optimistically rounded up from 25%).

    YO DAWG I HERD MAKING GAMES IS HARD
    GOOD THING YOURE NOT MAKING HOSPITALS

    • Skullinton

      I love how you dont consider the future updates that they are planing...

      • NeonGreenKermit

        Yeah, sure, of course. I've got some magic beans, want to buy?

      • Skullinton

        Sure, i'll give you 100$ for the cyanite one and then I'll give you another 100$ for you to shove it down your throat.

      • NeonGreenKermit

        Just... wow.

      • Skullinton

        Ok scratch that last comment (sorry).

        But have you read the full dev post on kickstarter?

      • troyster

        At least spell it right you shill

      • wfisher

        Based on their (soon-to-be) established track record, is it unreasonable to think that maybe their planned updates might

        1) Take significantly longer to deliver than planned?
        2) Might ultimately deliver less than 50% of the concepts/content being discussed now?

        Fair enough if they prove people wrong, but as it stands their track record speaks for itself.

        Note that at this point it's an academic question for me. I backed both kickstarters (about $50 total) but am not that interested anymore. FTL scratched that itch/ate their lunch months ago.

      • troyster

        Amen brother

  • odi0n

    Lol. The War balloon brothers spent that money on vices. That's what happened to the other 70% sim that was cut out.

    They went to strip clubs, Las Vegas, banged up some girls and partied like it was 1999. Lol.

    For those upset. I hear you, especially if you contributed. Nothing to do now, just move on and never back/support these people again.

    • Skullinton

      Do you have anything to support your current statement?

    • shadowmatt

      One very large fool.

      Do you understand the difference between ideas, brain storming, production, testing etc...

  • http://www.onebagtravel.com/ OneBagTravel

    I'm okay with 30% (i didn't fund the kick starter hah) but I just hope they keep supporting the game over the next year or so to incorporate the rest of the game, if possible.

  • Crimzzen

    I realize there are no promises on kickstarter and that your usually not gonna get what was promised but 30%?! 30% when the game was basically done (their words). What happened to all the content that was 'done?'

    Instead we're being asked to pay full price plus apparently IAP for a watered down strategy/resource management game. Doesn't this feel like a FarmVille-esque simulator under a thinly veiled pretense a of sci-fi ship command/management/exploration game?

    I wasn't sure how I was going to end this post but I can definitely say that it smacks of over-zealous dreams relying on kickstarter's safety net. At the very least, promises were made over 2 successful kickstarters with only a 30% completion rate. Some would call it bold faced lies and others naive wish listing. I would say it will make me think twice before investing in war balloon.

  • Illuminerdy

    People who have traditional consumer expectations and ideas about value added transaction shouldn't fund Kickstarter projects. Kickstarter is a risk proposition; you fund creatives hoping it will result in something great. It's venture capitalism for babies. If it is not what you hoped for, choose wisely next time. Stop acting like you've been cheated, like you went to the store brought home something labeled beer, but it was actually soda water.

    I funded Planetary Annihilation for $150. It could very well suck; they've been candid through the process, these StarCommand guys haven't. Still, I feel like the backers of this game feel far too slighted. Kickstarter is a different model, play by its rules. It will only be successful if these guys have the freedom to make the game they make, devoid of funder opinion. This is why studios try this instead of publishers in the first place.

  • venasque

    @Pietrole. I don’t think that is fair. You’re telling people to be more understanding of inexperienced developers while chastising Kickstarter backers for not being knowledgeable about investing. Why should we extend a courtesy you’re unwilling to show yourself? Kickstarter is a new thing and investing in such an endeavor is something the majority of backers would be inexperienced at. Telling us the developers are exempt from backlash because they are new to this, while judging investors for being naïve is hypocritical. If you want us to be more understanding, then you need to be more understanding yourself, and not just tell us we should know better.

  • inginious

    I'm just hoping they keep adding and developing onto this game, and not releasing a part 2 app with all features intended for the first one!

    As for the price, the ambitious game should have been worth $10... Since the game is only 30% of its intended vision, I'd say $2.99 sounds about right...

    Gameloft can totally take their idea and make an even better game that we all want because, you know, they're original like that...

  • venasque

    @Illuminerdy. That makes no sense. If I buy something labelled beer and it turns out to be soda water I'm supposed to be okay with it? Cuz that's the risks of going to the liquor store? That wasn't a good example to illustrate your point.

    • Skullinton

      You didn't buy anything, you supported a project, thus you are not entitled to say that you have been scammed. And that's the risk with kickstarter. It is written on their site that 50% of the project are funded and 75% are completed... There is a risk.

    • Illuminerdy

      That example was to illustrate the traditional point of purchase transaction. You should feel cheated in that scenario. Kickstarter, however, is not like that.

  • http://twitter.com/ModernJack1 JackModern

    while it's true it's they massed up the the developing,and not making the full game they wanted to make,not the mention the huge delay. ,,there is HUGE differents between vision and promises,which you can see in their kickstarter page they didn't promise all of that. lots of games are far from 100% of visions, by this logic you can bash almost every game,it's fact that additional ontent that couldn't be in the original game(not talking about DLC), eventually making it's way in,that's way you see that lots of "the vision" didn't make up to the final product,and might be afterwards.