Mobile analytics firm Flurry today reports on the continuing shift in portable gaming from dedicated devices to smartphones and other multipurpose devices. According to results compiled by Flurry from NPD market research and Flurry's own mobile app data, Apple's iOS and Google's Android mobile operating systems will account for 58% of portable gaming revenue in the United States for 2011, an almost exact flip-flop from 2010 when dedicated device leaders Nintendo and Sony held 57% of the market.

The most striking trend is that iOS and Android games have tripled their market share from roughly 20% in 2009 to nearly 60% in just two years. Simultaneously, Nintendo, the once dominant player, has been crushed down to owning about one-third of market in 2011, from having controlled more than two-thirds in 2009. Combined, iOS and Android game revenue delivered $500 million, $800 million and $1.9 billion over 2009, 2010 and 2011, respectively.

Flurry's data for 2011 is based on estimates for the final two months of the year, but suggests that the rapid growth in gaming on smartphone platforms is showing no signs of slowing. The market dynamics of free or low-cost games sometimes supplemented by in-app purchases and played on multi-function devices versus dedicated gaming devices with relatively high-cost game titles are clearly playing out in favor of iOS and Android. The result has been a surging gaming market increasingly attracting casual gamers willing to spend a few dollars to play on their phones, while established players have seen not only their shares but also their revenue declining each year.

Nintendo has been resisting increasing pressure to bring its games to the iPhone and other platforms, sticking by its long-standing tradition of making its games exclusive to its own hardware. Flurry suggests that the rapidly-shifting landscape of portable gaming may soon bring Nintendo face-to-face with a "Nokia-like" decision whether to jump over to smartphone platforms or watch its business erode away.

[Originally Posted on MacRumors]

  • Dr. Mark Lipschitz

    Nintendo is so stuck in their old ways.  They need to get out of hardware just like Sega did.  If this trend continues(which it will) where will the portable market be in 5 years?

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YYO2NCKWQZ5VMJ4QTY2P7BW2FU bob

      doesn't blow my mind at all.  Fruit Ninja is a more creative, original and just plain fun game than Nintendo has come up with in years...oh, and its about 1/30th the price of the average Nintendo game.

      • http://twitter.com/VULTR3 Mike

        Oh come on be fair, Bob. Fruit Ninja is totally boring. Unless you ride the short bus.

      • Anonymous

        Yeah just like Tetris is just boring brick stacking right? A simple premise can still be quite fun and fulfilling.

      • Anonymous

        I'm actually pretty bored by Tetris.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YYO2NCKWQZ5VMJ4QTY2P7BW2FU bob

        I'd rather play an hour of fruit ninja than an hour of ANOTHER zelda game any day of the week. 

      • Anonymous

        Yeah really -- who wants to get deeply involved with something rewarding when you can frantically simply swipe your finger across the screen for 2 minutes while taking a crap. 

      • Anonymous

        Hey don't knock sh**gaming, you can get some deep gameplay in.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7UKJQTJNEVE4QGS3CXD3OZHKU4 Vic Viper

        Nothing beats the creativity of a typical Legend of Zelda game, more than slicing fruits in half... not to mention, the hundreds of clones that come about whenever something released for the iPhone is actually worth playing!

      • Chris Aanerud

        I used to love Zelda...but after Twilight Princess (all 40+ hours of it) I am Zelda-ed out. You can only remake the same game so many times before it gets stale.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7UKJQTJNEVE4QGS3CXD3OZHKU4 Vic Viper

        Even so... from a game-play and level-design standpoint, I'd rather play a "slightly stale" game, than a bunch of smaller games that are half-hearted clones of each-other. Heck, anything's better than those 10,000 generic KRPG's that are released onto the app store every 24 hrs!

      • Anonymous

        Funny thing about Twilight Princess is: Nintendo made it similar to Ocarina of Time purposely because of all the complaining about Wind Waker and Majora's Mask. People were pissed when Nintendo tried to change things up a bit, so Nintendo made things the way they used to be (like people asked for)... and then people got pissed again, because they suddenly decided they liked the more "different" Zelda games after they had previously proclaimed that they hated them. Skyward Sword looks to follow the different/innovative style so far, and I hope it does.

      • Dr. Mark Lipschitz

        I'm sorry I would rather have any Zelda, Super Mario, Goldeneye, Mario Kart, Metroid, Smash Brothers, Donkey Kong, Pikimin and Star Fox just to name a few over many of the current iOS games(especially Fruit Ninja).  Rehash or not!  That being said I wouldn't buy another piece of Nintendo hardware to play them.  It would however be a no brainer purchase to me if they were available on iOS.

        Personally I don't understand why Sony and Nintendo are still even in the portable business.  They spend a load of money developing the hardware to try and become a standard and charge licensing fees to other game manufacturers.  Those days are done.  Sega, Capcom, EA and many other game developers are getting their feet wet on iOS and must be seeing the same decline in sales as Nintendo.  

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_E7GGSH32PQ2E5V6PGHZHZZ2M5E Anonymous

        I'm sorry I would rather have any Zelda, Super Mario, Goldeneye, Mario Kart, Metroid, Smash Brothers, Donkey Kong, Pikimin and Star Fox just to name a few over many of the current iOS games(especially Fruit Ninja).  Rehash or not!  That being said I wouldn't buy another piece of Nintendo hardware to play them.  It would however be a no brainer purchase to me if they were available on iOS.

        Personally I don't understand why Sony and Nintendo are still even in the portable business.  They spend a load of money developing the hardware to try and become a standard and charge licensing fees to other game manufacturers.  Those days are done.  Sega, Capcom, EA and many other game developers are getting their feet wet on iOS and must be seeing the same decline in sales as Nintendo.   -

        And you'll not see these iOS "iterations" be as nice looking or full featured.

        Serious developers want a decent monetary reward for their wares, which you won't get with the crap iOS pricing of .99-4.99.

        What incentive is there? I'll vote my wallet, as much as I love my iPad 2, gaming in 3DS is hands down a better more thrilling experience.

        That's what paying a fair $40 for a good games gets you:

        A full featured, good game. Not a .99, half assed jalopy of a game.

        See Monster Hunter Tri 3G and Resident Evil Revelations, for evidence.

      • Anonymous

        games on iOS gets updated atleast till a  new version comes out.

        I hope we all are considering any iOS game as a "Full" game (plus update data)

      • Dr. Mark Lipschitz

         Really?  I am playing a full version of GTA: Chinatown Wars.  Some pretty "full featured"  clones of console games made by Gameloft.  EA has some pretty "full featured" offerings as well.  I wouldn't replace my 360 or PS3 yet but I really see nothing on a portable that cant be done on a iOS device. 

      • Anonymous

        can be done and will be done is the difference.. as long as the price spiral points down we surely won't see big budget games developed for iOS because it would be very risky to break even .. even technical advances games like infinity blade are pretty basic and shallow from a gameplay perspective compare to some of nintendos offering on their mobile platform..  and if people compare god of war on psp with dungeon hunter &co on iOS you see why one cost a multitude of the other..

        it will be interesting to see how the customer react to the nearly full console prices for their games on the VITA, which is a big jump from their former psp prices and are completely in the opposite direction of the iOS price trends

        in the end iOS is still and foremost a casual gaming platform.. with alot of cheap (but quality) snacks for your short gaming needs..

      • Dr. Mark Lipschitz

         I disagree.  I think games are a little shallow because developers are still trying to figure out how to immerse the players without tactile buttons.  As far as game development costs; years ago you had to buy expensive SGI workstations to get a decent product.  Indie developers are getting pretty decent graphics with today's high end computers.  If you compare iOS to the current gen of portables I think the FPS online are pretty good,  the strategy games are pretty deep as is racing games.   

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, but the iOS version of GTA: CW is seriously lacking compared to the other versions. I used to play it on my iPod, but I got sick of the controls. So I bought the PSP version, and it is much better. The world feels more alive, and the graphics are a lot better, more features, better controls, etc. Not to say that iOS games suck though; There are a lot of great iOS games. Dead Space is definitely one of the best portable games I have played, and it's on iOS. Gameloft isn't the best example of "portable like" games, because they aren't "all there" if you know what I mean. The gameplay may be up to par (or almost up to par), but the story, the art, the characters, (the graphics) -the things which draw you into the game- are typically mediocre. Most of their games have no soul.  Some people are cool with that, because they don't care for any of that stuff- they only care for gameplay. But me- that stuff just pulls me out of the game. 

      • Benjamin Rodriguez

        Still, even if it were a crappy rehash. I'd probably still play old school gba/gb games, which can't be that hard to port.

      • Tom Cavallo

        more creative and original, not at all. not even close actually. it is only selling more cause of the last statement you made.

  • Anonymous

    Nintendo's penchant for little unique content and constant rehashes have finally caught up to it (not to mention deciding NOT to innovate and compete on Hardware and Specs which can drive wholly new content).

    First it was the Console space and now the handheld.

    All they really have going for them these days in the Software and they know it.

  • Anonymous

    I'd pay $15-$20 for official Nintendo ports of some Zelda and Mario games on iOS. I wonder how many people fall into my category where I will never buy/want a DS, but would buy a bunch of Nintendo games for iOS if they were available. For people like me, Nintendo wouldn't lose a hardware sale, but they'd gain software sales.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_5FLRQI2X2LU3IHMCG7HEAEFD5I Cat Astrophy

    Nintendo has had crap for releases this year on their handhelds in comparison to 2009 and 2010. So I wouldn't attribute all of this to some trend towards phones.

    • http://twitter.com/VULTR3 Mike

      Kids of the gameboy age all own iTouches now. I agree Nintendo does do crap releases though, that's not helping them.

    • Dr. Mark Lipschitz

      It doesn't matter what Nintendo released in 2009, 2010 or 2011.  Their market share in gaming dollars is in the decline.  Even with 2 AAA titles a month I doubt they could reverse this trend.  

    • Anonymous

      Indeed.  I attribute this to lackluster 3DS sales.  Also, the DS and PSP are clearly at the end of their life cycle.  Sony is prepping the Vita and Nintendo has a pretty strong line up for the 3DS this holiday season. 

      iOS and Android are MOST DEFINITELY a threat to Nintendo and Sony but I doubt either one is going anywhere soon.

      • Anonymous

        Oh I someone's going to drop out of the handheld market, whether its Nintendo, Sony, or both. It seems unlikely that either company will be successful in the long run.

      • http://twitter.com/bjornkeizers Bjorn Keizers

        I think Sony will disappear. Nintendo still has somewhat of a cult following and they survived many 'better' handhelds of the day like the Neo Geo Pocket Color, Sega Game Gear and others. Big N is suffering, but not as bad as Sony. 

        Sony keeps messing with the PSP and it's making gamers hesitant to buy one. For example, Sony first introduced the UMD disc with the first PSP. Then they ditched it for the UMD-less PSP Go. Which meant you had to rebuy your games if you wanted to switch. So nobody did, and dead was the Go. Then they went back to UMD to with a cheaper WiFi-less PSP. Who would ever buy this? And what happens to the digital download support? Who knows. 

        And now they are releasing a PSP Vita with yet another proprietary memory card format. I stopped buying PSP's after the Lite was introduced. That works, plays just fine and has cheap memory. And a good library of games too, if you care to do a bit of research. 

        But I'll NEVER, EVER, EVER buy another PSP. 

      • Anonymous

        I want to get the vita, I think it looks cool. But it could happen, if they cant turn up a miracle, then they could end up in a position where they'll either have to drop out or continue to lose money.

      • Anonymous

        The Vita isn't a PSP though; that's what Sony has tried to make very clear. While it is technically the successor to the PSP, its a completely new line. They're trying to distance themselves from the PSP because of all the mistakes they made with it. It was a great system, and it could've been greater if they hadn't taken so many missteps. If they put support behind the Vita, it'll likely do pretty well.

      • Dr. Mark Lipschitz

        The Vita is a PSP.  PSP=Playstation Portable.  The hardware may be different but it is a portable game system made by Sony.  For hardcore portable gamers only.  In this economy I just don't see this thing flying off shelves.   

      • Anonymous

        It's not in the same line though. Sony started from scratch. The PS Vita is to the PSP as the Virtual Boy is to the 3DS. That's why it's not called "PSP 2" or even really associated with the PSP. They're trying to make it something more than just a handheld gaming device. They've also stated that they're not killing off the PSP, and they'll be keeping it alive alongside the Vita. I guess you can call it a "PSP" because it technically is a portable Playstaion device, but calling it a PPS would make more grammatical sense. So I guess it's a Portable Playstation. Playstaion Portable is a brand, and it doesn't make as much to call it one, as it doesn't make sense.

      • Dr. Mark Lipschitz

         Your kidding right?  Your saying that the difference between the PSP and the Vita is like the 3DS and a system that was made 15 years ago, had a monochromatic screen and you had to stick your head into?  The Vita is the PSP 2.  Sony screwed up the PSP brand name so bad that they can no longer use it.  If the Vita really was a separate product then by your logic they should still be developing a PSP 2.  Hardware always changes.  The Vita has a lot more in common to the PSP than the PS had to the PS2 or the PS2 had to the PS3.  Don't buy into Sony's hype.  If the PSP brand name was a success then the Vita would be called The PSP 2.     

      • Anonymous

        So then a Corvette is the same as a Malibu, since they're both cars and they're both made by Chevrolet? The Vita is a separate line from the PSP. While yes, it is basically the successor, Sony is trying to market it as something entirely different. Sony doesn't see it as a PSP, and since THEY are the ones that made it, they can call it whatever the hell they want. I see your point, and while that's basically what it is (PSP 2), Sony is trying to not go down that path. The Virtual Boy thing was meant to be a joke...

      • Dr. Mark Lipschitz

        I cant find one example on Sony's website that shows me that they are trying to market it as something entirely different from the PSP. Just because they are still supporting the PSP doesnt mean anything. They supported the PS2 long after the PS3 was released and the PS long after the PS2 was released. The vita has the same form factor, performs the same functions, name change thats all.

      • Anonymous

        Is posting links allowed in the comments section? I'd post a link but I don't know if it's allowed. There's a video and a few articles with Sony execs talking about how the Vita isn't a PSP, and how it''s on a "higher level" than the 3DS and iOS/Android. It's all definitely marketing hype, but still- that''s what they're saying and how they're presenting it.

      • Benjamin Rodriguez

        You never know. I think 3D gaming is a little cliche honestly until I'm wearing goggles and digitally inserted into a gaming world, even if I didn't have free movement it would still be much more immersive then some "3D". I mean a hallmark pop out card looks exactly the same. But 3D movies to me are retarded as well, on top of they have to reduce visual quality to make a movie into 3D. So I guess being biased against 3D in the first place I never liked the idea of 3D gaming.

        But the point is. Nintendo can afford a few bad years, I still believe they got something up there sleeve that will be innovative to stay in the market. Technology has us thinking that the future is multi-purpose devices. But just cause you can't imagine something else taking over doesn't mean its not possible. And I think Nintendo can do it.

      • Anonymous

        I used to feel that way several months ago. But thats just wishful thinking, Im completely disillusioned to that.

  • Anonymous

    Why does nobody seem to regard the possibility that Nintendo might make their own smartphone device?  I could see Nintendo risking millions on a smartphone platform before they do something as drastic as leaving the hardware space.

    • Anonymous

      Their online philosophies would have to drastically change to make even a nintendo 
      "smartphone" meaningful. They can't enter the market with friend codes,miis and their current bullshit.

  • Chris Aanerud

    What this article neglects to mention is that 1 billion of this 1.9 billion dollars is all Angry Birds revenue.

    • Anonymous

      LOL close enough! I read $500mil (combined). The stores take 30% too, so that leaves $350mil / $1.9bil.

  • Texazzpete

    Such myopic comments!
    Smartphone gaming marketshare is increasing mainly because the overall market is expanding, not necessarily that Nintendo and Sony are losing customers by the bucketload.

    There's still enough room for Sony and Nintendo to make very tidy profits from the handheld scene.

  • Anonymous

    @Nintendo: Jump! Jump! Join Apple exclusively and together you will rule the handheld market. It's a no-brainer. Next year's graph would look like this... O

  • Anonymous

    What this article fails to mention is that the mobile gaming market is still growing (although based on this study, revenue did fall in 2009). While I don't doubt that iOS and Android are seriously shaking up the landscape, I wish this site would stop being so selective of its facts. I realize TA is one of (if not the) largest iOS gaming sites, and I love my iPod Touch, this site, and all the great games I have played and discovered. But running through those numbers, in 3 years Nintendo is still ahead of iOS and Android by over $1 billion. And yes, it looks like that gap will shrink and reverse in the next few years if the trend continues. But Nintendo is still a leader in the gaming industry with deep pockets, and known for it's creativity (e.g. the Wii). They have the ability to apply their creativity to mobile gaming, whereas Apple's mobile gaming device, as simply a touch screen, does not have the same flexibility. Of course, no one knows what new products either company has in the pipeline, but that's just some food for thought.

    Reviews are subjective, even interpreting data can be subjective, but leaving out key information to seriously one-side your argument is just poor journalism.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ML6FSGSCAZJYGRWGP7KM6GY7BM Eddie

    I always roll my eyes at articles like this on touchArcade because I don't come here to read about Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft (and whoever else) and how iOS is running thru all of them...and then I roll my eyes because Hodapp writes that s***. But thank you, Eric Slivka, for writing an article on the shift in portable gaming space by using pure journalism with stats, figures, and facts instead of bloated, fanboyish opinions!

  • Anonymous

    The thing people don't realize is that Nintendo and Sony aren't losing players. They're just not gaining as many as Apple. Most of the "gamers" under Apple's market share are completely new to the whole gaming scene. Most of them are either really young kids, or really old adults. The mobile market is rapidly increasing- not many people are jumping ship from Nintendo and Sony. Completely new people with no (or almost no) prior gaming knowledge get on board Apple's (and Android's) ship by simply downloading a game from the AppStore. If somebody buys even just 1 game, they count towards that percentage.

    • Anonymous

      I wouldn't be so sure about that.  As an avid gamer and father of 3 boys with 3 DSi's I can testify that they no longer care about them.  They don't look at the Nintendo games at the stores anymore or even ask about getting the new 3D model. They have absolutely no interest in the DS series now - it is almost exclusively iOS for gaming. The only competition is our PS3 and Wi. The Wii barely gets the light of day and the PS3 gets some attention by my 16 year old but not as much as the iPad. (I'm about 50/50 PS3 and iOS, even more on the PS3 side lately thanks to BF3). 

      • Anonymous

        I never said that there weren't people who ditched Nintendo or Sony. Overall, they're gaining more people than they're losing. A few people here and there really don't hurt them very much.

        I actually know a few people that quit iOS gaming, either because they decided it was a waste of money and time when they could be playing "real" games, or they just got bored of it and wanted to move on to the "next thing".

        Going by your logic: I'm not so sure that the numbers listed above are accurate, as I know more people who have quit iOS gaming than people who quit DS/PSP gaming.

    • Anonymous

      Quite the contrary, I think what some people dont realize is that both Nintendo and Sony lost a significant portion of their "core" audience during the DS/PSP's respective declines last year and the year before, and theyre never going to get them back. So Nintendo's not really gaining people, theyve lost people, and their mass market appeal. Its already happened, the vita/3DS is never going to reach the numbers that the DS/PSP made, and for that reason their yearly sales revenue is going to continue to drop, for Nintendo at least. Sony's just going to continue to lose money as theyve always have.

      • Anonymous

        That's what I love about Sony, it's like they're constantly apologizing for letting their Home audio/video units go to s***, by losing money on every new venture just to make us happy!

      • Anonymous

        Well actually, the 3DS has sold better than the DS did in the same period of its lifespan, so I think it's a bit too early to say that nobody will buy it. Nintendo is mainly losing money due to the 3DS price cut (selling at a loss), the fact that they are having to balance 3 systems and develop one (DS, Wii, 3DS, Wii U), and the fact that the yen is strong compared to most other currencies (and 80% of Nintendo's buisness is from outside of Japan). Right now, 3DS sales are actually on the rise. Have to agree about the DS and PSP though. Developement for those systems is practically dead, and the amount of people buying them is falling.

      • Anonymous

        The DS didnt really kick off until 2006-2007, after they rebranded and remarketed the DS with the DS Lite, and only because they did so. It would not have been anywhere near as successful if they hadnt done so. And their sales have recieved a very insignificant boost, its hardly rising enough to warrant such a drastic price drop..

      • Anonymous

        I'm not sure I'd call the sales boost insignificant; it was a 260% increase. They more than doubled their sales. And like I previously mentioned, 3DS sales are on the rise. It was the best selling system in Japan the month of October, and about 150,000 systems were sold the week of Super Mario 3D Land's launch.

      • Anonymous

        The Japanese market is pretty insignificant compared to the global market, and a holiday seasonal bump is not proof of any "momentum". If I were to hazard an uneducated guess, its probably going to sell 700-800 thousand in the US november-december combined, and thats not good, because anything woefully short of 2 million is a faliure.

      • Anonymous

        Yes, but the 260% increase in sales wasn't limited to Japan. It was a 260% increase in sales overall. The whole Japan thing was supposed to be an example- It's selling a lot more everywhere than it was before. I don't think there's a single place where sales have dropped. And the momentum didn't start up during the holiday season. It started back in August when the price dropped- back in Q3. That's when the 260% sales increase was observed. Q4 is the holiday quarter, not Q3. 

      • Anonymous

        You throw that 260% like it means something, but its still only sold over a few hundred thousand units. And thats only because they dropped the price, not to mention that dropping the price cut their revenue by a third. Its temporary, as soon as the holiday season passes, their sales will drop back down.

      • Anonymous

        I'm not sure I'd call the sales boost insignificant; it was a 260% increase. They more than doubled their sales. And like I previously mentioned, 3DS sales are on the rise. It was the best selling system in Japan the month of October, and about 150,000 systems were sold the week of Super Mario 3D Land's launch.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WI4G66W4J3DNS7K7TBP2DQYK6M Greg

    I go back and play a DS game from time to time and I can't wait for the new Mario Land 3D and Mario Kart 7 to come out.  The depth, creativity, gameplay, and scale of these games is well beyond most anything in the iOS space, IMHO.  I spend most of my gaming time on iOS, but I would be very sad if Nintendo and their AAA releases went away.  For me, that would leave me with lots of mini-esque bite-sized appetizer games on my phone, but no main course to look forward to.

  • http://twitter.com/Platronic John Francis

    The real point is it was Nintendo's market to lose. Now it's Nintendo's market to get back. They did it with the Wii and seriously broadened the potential market as well getting Sony and MS to follow suit. Japanese companies are difficult to track and predict but Nintendo has clear avenues to gain back market share if they are willing to pursue them.

  • http://twitter.com/RymanM Ryan Mendez

    -scratches head-

    I don't see what this article is suppose to portray. All I see is iOS gaming overtaking, in a single year, two handhelds that had reached their end of the cycle the year before. The article, written with very clear bias, is trying to put on a spin that two giant companies are dying out of the handheld buisiness because two of their old, out of date handhelds, which are DEAD or DYING, is not generating as much revenue as a bunch of 99c-4.99$ games.

    • Mr_Ugly

      i agree, comparing current mobile sales in comparison to 2 devices who at the end of their lifecylce is quite odd.. of course the income generated by the psp and ds are declining.. what else should happen when their successors are released or coming very soon..

      thats like saying that iphone 4 sales declined alot in the last quarter ignoring the fact that the 4s was released and portraying it in a way that apples position in general gets weaker..

      very odd.. but of course flurry analytics is completely unbiased since their main income does not rely on ios, android & co.. but sony and nintendo.. right..

  • Johnny Donuts

    At least it's not as biased as Hodapp's articles.

  • Anonymous

    3DS' development started years ago while iPhone wasn't even released yet. So, it's quite hard for Nintendo to adjust to the current situation: everything came so suddenly and basically from nowhere (speaking of gaming on mobile phones, which wasn't taken seriously before iPhone) and is moving so fast in the portable world. Sure, Nintendo's ways maybe old school but so are all console developers, when it comes to making sudden changes on your business strategy (it takes five years to develop your console, after all)  but there was no way of knowing that in just four years iPhone and other smartphones would take over the portable gaming business, so quickly.

  • Curtis Shideler

    I only miss my DS because I loved to play Metroid Prime, Super Mario 64, Mario Kart, Final Fantasy 3, Lego games, and a few other random titles.

    After selling it and getting an iPhone, I can now play NOVA, Sega Racing, Final Fantasy 3, Lego Harry Potter, as well as many platforming titles... all on the same device without different game cartridges! AND I could play these games on my phone, ipod, OR ipad!

    Sure, I'd consider purchasing another Mario or Metroid game someday... If it was available for iOS or maybe even my home PC or Mac...(I have ROMs of the games I own, trust me!) But I will never be purchasing Nintendo hardware again. It was fun while it lasted Nintendo... And I would love to relive those old memories again on my phone (other than emulated copies). But until they offer their classic titles on my handheld, I will allow other companies to provide me with new classics.

    PopCap, Chair, Gameloft, Sega, Capcom... They are all getting the money I would have gladly given Nintendo had they decided to jump on board the iOS train. I can't even imagine how much they would be making if they had even just been porting old titles. $2-5 per classic title like Super Mario Brothers or Zelda or Excite Bike... could really add up with all of us 20-40 year old consumers now using iPhones! Just think. Nintendo might actually be able to break even.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YSYYB7PKCRIMLNBDJNUTEMWSAQ Steve

    The article is misleading, it makes you think that Nintendo isn't doing as well as it used to...  Nintendo may have a lower percentage but that is only because the mobile market has grown...  Nintendo has said recently that the 3DS had sold as much so far as the DS did at this point in it's life and most of Nintendos games for it so far have sold in the millions,  how many IOS games sell in the millions?

    • http://twitter.com/21tigermike Michael A. Robson

      I wouldn't go there. There's like 300 thousand iOS games, and the iOS devices have outsold the DS by about 100 million units. It's not looking for for Nintendo.

  • scott slomiany

    I'm a bit confused by the whole "why would I want to play a silly Nintendo game when I've got all my awesome 5 minute timewaster IOS games," and yet at the same the argument seems to be "why won't Nintendo release those same games on the platform of my choice because I love them so."

    And yes, the way the data is presented is pretty slanted. For the most part, IOS market share is added new income to the mobile space, not outright theft of income from somewhere else, so the conclusion that Nintendo, right now, is doomed unless it releases it's games on IOS is false. And surprisingly, the 3DS is ahead of sales compared to the same amount of time on the market as the original DS. And that's with no decent launch software. So writing Nintendo off at this point is pretty silly.

    Now, that's not to say that there is going to be a loss of future revenue in the future due to kids adopting touches or dad's retired iPhones instead of getting a 3DS (or whatever) in the future.

    For the record, both my kids have a DS and "parental replacement" iPhones without the simcard. Generally, what happens is this: they'll dink around on the iPhones for a while, go through every single game, a couple of minutes at a time...and then spend the rest of the evening playing 1 or 2 games on the DS.

  • Brad Billman

    I pee standing up

  • http://twitter.com/hankaziz Hank Aziz

    What an idiotic comparison and sorry excuse of a study. Both the DS and PSP are sunsetting platforms with PRACTICALLY NO MAJOR RELEASES THIS YEAR, and very few major releases in the last couple of years as well.

  • Anonymous

    It would be like a punch to the gut if Nintendo had to switch to developing for iOS. No one wants that. I don't see games with as much depth as Pokemon being developed to be sold for $0.99. If Nintendo can't sell games at reasonable prices of $30 or so, most of its franchises will probably die. Also, if the iOS platform becomes the predominant one, some of our favorite niche genres will probably die out. Those games don't sell many copies, and need to be sold at higher prices to turn profits.